Archive for the ‘NC Pottery’ Category

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Special Programs to Accompany the Foodwares Exhibition

September 11, 2013

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Three special programs are planned by North Carolina Pottery Center (NCPC) in Seagrove, NC, to go along with the “Foodwares: Pottery for Storage and Preparation of Food” exhibition that is on display through Oct. 26, 2013.

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Works from Cady Clay Works

On Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013, noted food historian and hearth cook Kay Moss from Gastonia, NC, will be at NCPC presenting a talk about early hearth cookery in the 18th and early 19th centuries, showing how the pottery from that time played an important role in cooking. Moss will present her talk twice that day, once at 11:30am and once at 2pm.

Moss is both an historian and a hands-on hearth cook. She was the founder of the 18th century Backcountry Lifeways Studies Program at the Schiele Museum in Gastonia, NC, and remained the head of that program for many years before her retirement, a retirement which hardly seems less active than her work years! “The Backcountry Housewife,” which Kay Moss co-wrote with Kathryn Hoffman, continues to be a must-have for hearth cooks in the southeastern US. Moss also is the author of “Decorative Motifs from the Southern Backcountry”, “Journey to the Piedmont Past, Southern Folk Medicine 1750-1820″ (a sometimes horrifying scholarly study of early medical practices), and her latest book just released by the University of South Carolina Press, “Seeking the Historical Cook: Exploring Eighteenth-Century Southern Foodways”.

In addition to her scholarly work, Moss still teaches hearth cooking skills at the John C. Campbell Folk School in western North Carolina. Her many years of study and practice have made her an expert on that subject.

Moss’s easygoing manner encourages her audiences to ask questions about early food history. Visitors will learn about the cooking practices of their ancestors and may even go home more knowledgeable about how to cook when the power goes off!

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Work by Tom Gray

Then on Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013, there will be two programs:

From 11-11:30am, Benjamin Grandon, an agent with the NC Cooperative Extension Service of Randolph County, will be giving a presentation titled “Local Foods and Community Supported Agriculture: How North Carolinians can help North Carolina.” Learn about what is grown in North Carolina, the Local Foods and Farm to Table initiatives in our state and how to find out and support local farmer wherever you live. Grandon has extensive knowledge of crops and gardens all over the state. Are you a locovore? Come find out!

From 2-4pm, Venice Willett, a volunteer with the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service at the Randolph County Center, will be at the center cooking foods in pottery, using a tabletop oven. Willett has cooked in pottery dishes for many years, and is one of the Randolph County Cooperative Extension Service’s most knowledgeable volunteers. She will share with you her excitement about cooking, as well as an enthusiasm for all the wonderful pottery foodwares made in the state of North Carolina. Willett will also give out recipes and offer tastes of some of the dishes.

The North Carolina Pottery Center will be open at no charge to the public for these events, though donations are always welcome and appreciated.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the John W. & Anna H. Hanes Foundation, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue.-Sat., 10am – 4pm.

For more information, call NCPC at 336/873-8430, check the website at (www.ncpotterycenter.com), or visit the North Carolina Pottery Center’s Facebook page.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Family Day, on Sept. 21, 2013, in Celebration of Seagrove’s Centennial

August 30, 2013

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On Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, the town of Seagrove, NC, is celebrating its centennial anniversary with a Centennial Celebration. Wishing to contribute to the day’s celebration of the area’s history and the festive atmosphere of the occasion, the North Carolina Pottery Center is having a Family Day on Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, in cooperation with Seagrove’s Centennial Celebration.

The North Carolina Pottery Center will be contributing to the day by showcasing the tradition of pottery through demonstrations and other activities! Please join us as we help to celebrate Seagrove’s 100th anniversary.

All NCPC activities will be taking place on NCPC property except for the 12:00-2:30pm NCPC booth at the Seagrove Centennial Celebration. Alcohol, tobacco, firearms, and other weapons are prohibited. No pets, with the exception of service animals, will be allowed onsite on Family Day due to liability issues.

It is recommend that attendees bring folding chairs, blankets, etc. as some of the day’s activities will be located outside.

NCPC-entrance

Schedule of North Carolina Pottery Center Activities on Family Day, Saturday, September 21, 2013, include:

12:00-2:30pm – Pottery Identification by Dr. Terry Zug and Steve Compton (Inside the NCPC). Dr. Terry Zug is a pottery expert who is the former chair of Southern Folklore at UNC-Chapel Hill and author of “Turners and Burners: The Folk Potters of North Carolina”. Steve Compton is an avid longtime pottery collector who was the first president of the North Carolina Pottery Collectors’ Guild.
· Maximum of three pottery pieces per person.
· Donations are welcomed and encouraged, but not mandatory, for this service. Suggested donation: $5.

12:00-2:30pm – Pottery Ornaments for Kids & General Info with Seo Eo and his students (NCPC Booth at the Seagrove Centennial Celebration on Old Plank Road). Seo Eo, an Associate Professor of Ceramics at East Carolina University, and some of his students will be helping kids paint bisque ornaments.
· Free – Donations are welcomed.

12:15– 2:15pm – Native American Pottery Demo by Caroleen Sanders (On the grounds of the NCPC). A Catawba Indian master potter, Caroleen Sanders, learned to make pottery in the traditional Catawba method by watching her mother and other family members and will be demonstrating her craft for visitors.
· Free

1:15 – 3:15pm – Raku Firing Demo by David Garner & Dan Triece (On the grounds of the NCPC). David Garner is a life-long local potter who has stretched his creative boundaries and is known for his horsehair and Raku pottery. Garner is the owner of Turn & Burn Pottery in Seagrove. Dan Triece is another local potter who makes use of a variety of colors and glaze combinations and is known for his copper luster Raku pottery. Triece is the owner of DirtWorks Pottery in Seagrove, N.C.
· Free

2 – 3pm – Pottery Turning Demonstration by Chad Brown (NCPC Education Building). Chad Brown is a local 5th generation potter who is recognized as an up and coming potter and who has been invited to show at this year’s Potters Market Invitational in Charlotte, NC, on Sept. 7, 2013. Brown has purchased some land recently and is also in the process of building a kiln.
· Free

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3:30 – 4:30pm – Agate-ware Turning Demo by Eck McCanless (NCPC Education Building). Eck McCanless, a local potter, has been turning pots since the age of 18 and is known for his distinctive “agateware” pottery. He and his family were the subjects of Jim Sharkey’s film, “The Fourteenth Shop”, which won the Award for Creative Excellence at the 2002 International Film and Video Festival in Redondo Beach, CA. McCanless is the owner of Eck McCanless Pottery in Seagrove.
· Free

5:00-7pm – Evening Festivities (On the grounds of the NCPC).
· Music – Bluegrass Experience. The Bluegrass Experience, one of the Southeast’s most respected traditional music groups.
· Food – BBQ sandwiches, fixings, dessert and drinks. (While quantities last – Donations are welcomed.)

This schedule of events is subject to modification by the North Carolina Potter Center. Inclement weather may affect the feasibility of some activities.

For more information about the schedule of activities (parade, booths on Old Plank Road, historical displays, etc.) being undertaken by the Seagrove Centennial Celebration, please visit the “Seagrove NC Centennial” page on Facebook.

The North Carolina Pottery Center looks forward to adding to a fun and festive atmosphere and celebration of Seagrove’s 100th anniversary!

North Carolina Pottery Center activities and projects are supported, in part, by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tuesday – Saturday from 10 am – 4 pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430, visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org) or on Facebook.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Groundhog Wood Firing – Aug. 31, 2013

August 30, 2013

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Join us at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, to learn about the  groundhog wood firing process with Seagrove potter Chad Brown as he fires the groundhog kiln on the pottery center lawn. Brown will be available to explain the groundhog wood firing process and answer questions from 10am – 4pm.  Seagrove potters Chad Brown and Sid Luck have been working recently on making some necessary repairs to the groundhog kiln, and the kiln is now ready for firing again. The firing of the groundhog kiln takes approximately 15 hours and uses 2 cords of wood.

Brown is a 5th generation potter; his great-great grandfather was William Henry Chriscoe. Brown learned his technical skills in the more traditional Seagrove fashion, working for years as a production potter for many studios. He expanded his skills by working as a journeyman potter, traveling from studio to studio and turning the various shapes required. Brown has participated in numerous wood firings with various potters including Sid Luck, Terry Hunt, David Stuempfle, Mark Hewitt and Donna Craven. He does turning demonstrations at the pottery center on most Saturdays. This year, Brown has been invited to show at the 9th Annual Potters Market Invitational held at the Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC on Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013.

While you are at the center, you can also explore our current temporary exhibition, “Foodwares: Pottery for Storage and Preparation of Food.” Pottery and food – What a natural combination! Art in everyday life is highlighted in the NCPC exhibition of NC pottery used for food storage, food preparation, and cooking. One half of the wares displayed are historical, the rest are contemporary. This exhibition, curated by Mary Farrell of Westmoore Pottery, runs through Oct. 26, 2013.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the John W. & Anna H. Hanes Foundation, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue – Sat 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

North Carolina Pottery Center Presents 14th Annual Auction, “Going, Going, Gone to Pots,” at Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales in Hillsborough, NC – Aug. 28, 2013

August 8, 2013

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The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, will present its 14th Annual Auction, “Going, Going, Gone to Pots,” to be held on Wednesday, August 28, 2013, at Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales (620 Cornerstone Court, Hillsborough, NC).

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Work by Stanley Mace Anderson

There will also be a pre-auction supper, “Fill Your Plate,” with food prepared by several of North Carolina’s best chefs including:

• Scott Crawford: Herons at the Umstead Hotel & Spa
• Andrea Reusing: Lantern in Chapel Hill
• Brendan Cox: Oakleaf in Pittsboro
• Angelina Koulizakis-Battiste: Angelina’s Kitchen in Pittsboro

Before supper, participants in “Fill Your Plate” will also select a handmade North Carolina plate to take home after supper!

• Times — Supper: 6:00 pm, Live Auction: 7:30 pm
• Prices — Supper and Auction: $75, Auction only: $10

During and after supper, there will be a silent auction featuring pots donated by some of NC’s best potters, as well as some exciting non-pottery items. We will also be raffling several great items.

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Work by Sylvia Coppula

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Work by Ben Owen III

Tickets may be purchased via the NCPC website (www.ncpotterycenter.org), by e-mailing to (info@ncpotterycenter.org), or by phone at 336/873-8430.

To view images of auction items, please visit the “14th Annual Auction” (https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151670355936007.1073741838.102520396006&type=3) photo album on our Facebook page (no account needed). We will be adding images to that album as the donated pottery pieces and non-pottery items arrive.

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Work by Benjamin Burns

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Work by George Rector

Additionally, closer to the date of the auction, all auction items will be viewable online via (llauctions.com) and (auctionzip.com). There will also be an option, facilitated by LLAES, Ltd., for telephone and absentee bidding for persons unable to attend the live auction.

Sponsors: Amick Sales and Service, Ben Owen III, First Bank of Troy, Four Saints Brewing, Grove Park Inn, Jugtown Pottery, Mark Hewitt, North Carolina Museum of Art, North Carolina Zoo, O.Henry Hotel, Shelton Vineyards, Tommy Cranford, Umstead Hotel & Spa, and other friends.

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Work by Mark Gordon

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tuesday – Saturday from 10 am – 4 pm.

For more information, please call 336/873.8430 or go to (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC, Launches New Microsite Devoted to Surrealist Artist Charles Seliger

July 19, 2013

MintMuseumlogo

Following the success of its recently launched microsite devoted to North Carolina pottery, The Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC, has launched a new site devoted to the Surrealist artist Charles Seliger, at (Seliger.mintmuseum.org). The site serves as an interactive digital exhibition catalogue, following the museum’s highly-regarded 2012 exhibition devoted to the artist, which traveled internationally. Because it is especially useful for reaching younger audiences, the Mint has named the site a “kid-alogue” and hopes to make it a model for similar future projects.

The Mint received international attention for its groundbreaking exhibition “Seeing the World Within: Charles Seliger in the 1940s,” which was on view at the Mint from Feb. through May 2012. It was one of three simultaneous exhibitions making up “Surrealism and Beyond”, which was the largest and most significant examination of Surrealism ever presented in the Southeast. After its presentation at the Mint, the Seliger show traveled to museums in Venice, Italy and Utica, New York. The show, which was the first to examine the vibrant, intricate canvases created by Seliger during the first decade of his career, was seen by more than 150,000 visitors. The exhibition was accompanied by a beautifully-designed printed catalogue containing new insights on Seliger’s work, colorful reproductions of the paintings in the show, and striking details of these canvases.

“This microsite will continue to engage local, national, and international audiences long beyond the conclusion of our exhibition,” said Jonathan Stuhlman, the Mint’s Curator of American Art and organizer of the Surrealism shows. “We are proud to once again offer our global community a new way to learn about and engage with the work of an important artist.”

The site’s features include a broad, illustrated overview of Seliger’s artistic development and the context in which it took place, accompanied by high resolution, zoomable images; a digital gallery of Seliger’s work from the 1940s; rare video clips of interviews with the artist; and a series of thought-provoking questions and suggested activities linked to Seliger and his work. Designed in conjunction with the Eastco Group of Orchard Park, New York and with key input from the museum’s department of Learning and Engagement, this project is calculated to appeal to a broad audience, ranging from middle- and high school students to art lovers to educators.

Major funding was provided by the Terra Foundation for American Art; The Dedalus Foundation; and The Mint Museum Auxiliary. Additional support for this project was generously provided by Charlie Murray and Welborn and Patty Alexander. The museum is also grateful to Lenore Seliger, Michael Rosenfeld, and halley k harrisburg for their assistance and commitment to the artist.

In November 2012, the Mint launched its first microsite, devoted to its North Carolina pottery collection, the most comprehensive in the country, at (NCpottery.mintmuseum.org). Funded by a generous Technology Integration Project grant from the Knight Foundation, that site also contains interactive components that invite visitors to learn more about the creation of art and its relevance to our state’s history and culture. Visitors can search the Mint’s collection by potter, region, or type of object, as well as find full-text versions of Mint exhibition catalogues devoted to North Carolina pottery and curriculum connections that should be of particular interest to educators. Both microsites are available as links from the Mint’s award-winning main site, (mintmuseum.org), under “Resources.”

“These microsite projects advance the Mint’s ongoing goal of finding new, innovative ways to make its art accessible to the widest possible audience,” said Dr. Kathleen V. Jameson, President & CEO of the Mint. “We hope our visitors, both in person and online, will leave feeling inspired and transformed by their interactions.”

As the oldest art museum in North Carolina, with one of the largest collections in the Southeast, The Mint Museum offers its visitors inspiring and transformative experiences through art from around the world via innovative collections, groundbreaking exhibitions, and riveting educational programs. The Mint Museum is a non-profit, visual arts institution comprised of two dynamic facilities: Mint Museum Uptown and Mint Museum Randolph.

Located in what was the original branch of the United States Mint, Mint Museum Randolph opened in 1936 in Charlotte’s Eastover neighborhood as the state’s first art museum. Today, in a beautiful park setting, intimate galleries invite visitors to engage with the art of the ancient Americas, ceramics and decorative arts, fashion, European and African art, among other collections. Resources include a reference library with over 18,000 volumes, a theater featuring lectures and performances, and a museum shop offering merchandise that complements both the permanent collection and special exhibitions.

Mint Museum Uptown houses the internationally renowned Craft + Design collection, as well as outstanding collections of American, contemporary, and European art. Designed by Machado and Silvetti Associates of Boston, the five-story, 145,000-square-foot facility combines inspiring architecture with cutting-edge exhibitions to provide visitors with unparalleled educational and cultural experiences. Located in the heart of Charlotte’s burgeoning center city, Mint Museum Uptown is an integral part of the Levine Center for the Arts, a cultural campus that includes the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art, the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts and Culture, the Knight Theater, and the Duke Energy Center. Mint Museum Uptown also features a wide range of visitor amenities, including the 240-seat James B. Duke Auditorium, the Lewis Family Gallery, art studios, a restaurant, and a museum shop.

For more information, visit (mintmuseum.org).

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Pottery Lecture by Dr. John Burrison – Aug. 4, 2013

July 9, 2013

NCPClogosmall

Dr. John Burrison from Georgia State University in Atlanta, GA, will be delivering a special presentation entitled “Clay Nation: Traditional Folk Pottery of the United States” at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, on Aug. 4, 2013, from 2-4pm.

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Dr. Burrison has a Ph.D. in Folklore and Folklife from the University of Pennsylvania and is Regents Professor and director of the Folklore Curriculum at Georgia State University in Atlanta. He is curator of the permanent exhibition “Shaping Traditions: Folk Arts in a Changing South” in the Atlanta History Museum and of the Folk Pottery Museum of Northeast Georgia at Sautee Nacoochee. His publications include “Brothers in Clay: The Story of Georgia Folk Pottery” (1983 and later editions); “From Mud to Jug: The Folk Potters and Pottery of Northeast Georgia” (2010); “Fluid Vessel: Journey of the Jug,” Ceramics in America (2006); “The Living Tradition of English Country Pottery,” Folk Life (1997-98); “Survivors: The Country Potters of Post-Industrial England,” The Studio Potter (1997), and the “Pottery” entries in The Greenwood Encyclopedia of African American Folklore, Encyclopedia of Applachia, and Encyclopedia of Southern Culture.

This event is free and open to the public. An RSVP is not required to attend this event, but would be appreciated. You may RSVP either via our Facebook page or by e-mailing to (info@ncpotterycenter.org).

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

NCPC-entrance

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue.-Sat., from 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

The Orange County Historical Society in Hillsborough, NC, Will Present “Let’s Talk – NC Pottery” with Pottery Collector Dr. A Everette James – July 19, 2013

July 7, 2013

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The Orange County Historical Society in Hillsborough, NC, will present “Let’s Talk – NC Pottery” with Dr. A Everette James, renowned pottery expert, collector, and author, on Friday, July 19, 2013, beginning at 7pm at Leland Little Auction Gallery, located a 620 Cornerstone Court in Hillsborough.

Bring your own unidentified piece of NC pottery and see what Dr. James and others present have to say about its origin at the “Pottery Road Show”. There will also be a silent auction featuring pottery by local artisans and refreshments. All proceeds benefit the Orange County Historical Museum.

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Dr. James is the author of “North Carolina Art Pottery, 1900 – 1960″. The history of pottery as utilitarian ware is well documented. About 1900, the more toward art pottery began in North Carolina. Dr. Everette James of Chapel Hill, NC, has now documented that transition in a book. With over 900 color illustration and detailed legends, “North Carolina Art Pottery, 1900 – 1960,” is not only a must for serious collectors, it is a beautiful coffee table book for any pottery lover.

Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. Purchase by phone at 919/732-2201 or in person from Hillsborough Visitors Center, Leland Little, or the Museum (201 N. Churton in Hillsborough). Seating is limited so get your tickets now.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Names Lindsey Lambert as Center’s New Director

May 21, 2013

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The board of directors of the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, are pleased to announce the hiring of Lindsey Lambert as the center’s new executive director. He will officially start at the beginning of June.

Lambert is the former director of the Brock Historical Museum and College Archives at Greensboro College, a position he held for over a decade, and he is the current board president of the North Carolina Museums Council (NCMC), an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) organization comprised of several hundred museum professionals across the state.

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Lambert has a BA in History from NCSU and a MA in Public History from Appalachian State University. On NCMC’s board, he has previously served as nominating chair, treasurer, and vice president. He comes to the Pottery Center with a solid array of museum, technical, networking and grant writing skills, as well as a youthful energy and a sound appreciation of pottery and its traditions. Mark Hewitt, current president of the Pottery Center’s board, says, “It is good news that the Pottery Center has someone so capable to direct its activities, and we expect his tenure to coincide with increased visibility for the Pottery Center, its mission, and all the potters of North Carolina.” Lambert was born, raised and still resides in Randolph County.

Of the Pottery Center, Lambert says, “Working collaboratively we can help the Pottery Center to better realize its full potential of promoting public awareness and appreciation of the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. In addition to serving as the Pottery Center’s director, I am also becoming a member at the Sustainer level because I support the center’s mission and feel that it is important to support it financially as well as through my work.”

Hewitt also says, “Thanks must be given to the tireless Board members and advisors who wrote grants to Z. Smith Reynolds and the John Hanes Foundation that provided funds for the position. Thanks go also to the members of the search committee for identifying our new director. There are many fine people working on behalf of the Center, and we are delighted to have Lambert leading such a talented and dedicated team.”

Currently on display until July 27 is an exhibit entitled “Big Red: Chrome Red and Other Red Glazes of the North Carolina Piedmont.”

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the John W. & Anna H. Hanes Foundation, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

NC Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Popular Fundraiser – Potter’s Palette 2 – May 4, 2013

April 20, 2013

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Rembrandt, Van Gogh, and Jackson Pollack have nothing on the potters of North Carolina. Can you buy an Old Master canvas? I didn’t think so. But you can buy a fabulous painting, on a 12” x 12” canvas, produced by one of the mighty potters of North Carolina!

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Work by Mark Hewitt

Not only can you get a great painting to enjoy in your home, but when you bid on one, you’ll also be supporting the North Carolina Pottery Center.

We’re very excited about our upcoming fundraiser, The Potter’s Palette 2, and invite you to mark your calendars and come to the Pottery Center for this exciting auction on Saturday, May 4, 2013, from  4–7pm.

Last year’s event was entertaining, and the canvases were superb. We plan to raise more money and have more fun this year! There will be live music, a buffet, and beer and wine. Many of the painting potters will attend as featured guests.

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Eck McCanless working on his piece

Tickets for the event will be $15.00 per person or 2 for $25.00. Don’t miss the excitement!

Potters, in case you didn’t already know, are very creative people, and can paint beautifully, as well as make fabulous pots, so, who knows, you might end up with a painting that becomes an Old Master!

We’ll be posting images of all the canvases and further details online prior the event.

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Work by Fred Johnston

Please RSVP by Apr. 30, 2013. Call the Pottery Center at 336/873-8430 (Tue.-Sat., 10am-4pm). All the details and images of works can be see at (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

Lincoln County Historical Association Receives North Carolina Museums Council’s Award of Excellence for Book “Valley Ablaze: Pottery Tradition in the Catawba Valley”

April 12, 2013

On March 24th and 25th, as part of the Annual Conference in Raleigh, NC, the North Carolina Museums Council presented a slate of awards to individuals and institutions that exemplify excellence in the museum community around the state. Award recipients come from museums of all sizes, budgets, and geographic locations around the state.

The awards program is a long-standing part of the annual meeting to recognize, encourage, and promote excellence within the activities of the museum community and organizations in related fields of interest. This year, NCMC awarded four Awards of Excellence, two Awards of Special Recognition, the Emerging Professional Award, the Professional Service Award, the Dennis T. Lawson Memorial Award, and the William T. Alderson Lifetime Achievement Award.

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The Lincoln County Historical Association of Lincolnton, North Carolina received an Award of Excellence for the book “Valley Ablaze: Pottery Tradition in Catawba Valley,” by Jason Harpe and Brian Dedmond, with photography by Melanie Dawn Crouse.  Designed and published by Nathan W. Moehlmann of Goosepen Studio & Press, in Conover, North Carolina, Valley Ablaze is a 242-page hardcover volume that chronicles the rich pottery tradition in the Catawba Valley region of North Carolina from the late eighteenth century to the present.  Traditional and contemporary alkaline-glazed forms and wood-fired groundhog kilns come alive in full color photographs mixed with vintage images of potters and their work.

With a foreword by Dr. Charles “Terry” Zug, author of the acclaimed Turners and Burners: The Folk Potters of North Carolina, and contributions from Scott Smith, Jeff Pruett, and Barry Huffman (all noted scholars and authors of Catawba Valley pottery in particular and North Carolina’s ceramic tradition in general), Valley Ablaze spotlights over 1,000 pieces of masterfully crafted utilitarian forms from the Catawba Valley’s earliest documented potters in the late eighteenth century to the face jugs of Burlon Craig, the nationally-recognized folk potter from Lincoln County who kept this pottery tradition alive from the 1960s through the early 1980s.

Also showcased is the work of contemporary potters who directly or indirectly learned traditional methods of production from Burlon Craig, such as Charles Lisk, whose pieces are sought nationally by collectors and exhibited in museums across the country, and Kim Ellington, who was featured in the NC Museum of Art’s exhibition and catalog The Potter’s Eye. A new group of potters who are continuing the tradition while adding their own unique and special adaptations to utilitarian forms are also thoroughly documented, most for the first time.

The NCMC began in December 4, 1963, when 35 museum professionals met in downtown Raleigh at the Sir Walter Raleigh Hotel and proposed the establishment of an organization that would connect colleagues throughout the state and promote their institutions regionally and nationally.

NCMC’s current mission is to enhance public education by improving the administrative, interpretive, and collections practices of museums, historic sites, science centers and related facilities in North Carolina; and to stimulate public support for the work performed by these facilities.

This year marks 50 years that the North Carolina Museum’s Council has provided a unified voice for museum’s and museum professionals in North Carolina.

To learn more about “Valley Ablaze: Pottery Tradition in the Catawba Valley,” visit (www.valleyablaze.com), and for more information on the North Carolina Museums Council, visit (www.ncmuseums.org).


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