Posts Tagged ‘Seagrove NC’

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Presents Monthly Lecture Series, Starting Oct. 17, 2014

October 8, 2014

NCPClogosmall

This on-going lecture series will be facilitated by Josh Floyd, the new Artist-in-Residence at the center. Floyd comes to the center with a Bachelor of Arts with Art Concentration from Fairmont State University in West Virginia, and he has been making pots for over ten years. He studied for two years as an Artist-in-Residence at the Cub Creek Foundation in Appomattox, VA, and has worked two years as a studio and gallery assistant for Smicksburg Pottery in Pennsylvania. He has also been a studio assistant at the Penland School of Craft. Before accepting the position as the North Carolina Pottery Center’s AiR, he was working for the Laguna Clay Company in Byesville, OH, testing clays and glazes. “The goal of these talks is to engage the local pottery community and help to foster networking opportunities with presenters and the audience, while exposing the local artists and the community to influences outside of our region,” according to Josh.

Lindsey Lambert, executive director, says, “Having Josh as our new AiR is literally a breath of fresh air. He will enable us to offer more educational programs and workshops, things which help us better fulfill our mission of promoting awareness and appreciation of the history, heritage and ongoing tradition of pottery making in our great state. This is a wonderful opportunity for the public and potters to meet out new Artist in Residence and enjoy an evening of NC pottery education and entertainment. ”

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Fred Johnston

The first potter to present in this series is Seagrove potter Fred Johnston. Johnston is a well-known, lively personality and story teller. According to him, “As a potter I will talk about developing and creating an ongoing vision for my work. Being an art museum junkie, I recently visited the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco which has the most comprehensive collection of Asian ceramics in the western world. I photographed many examples that will be presented as well as other cultural influences.”

Future topics of the series include; Regional and National Ceramic Artists, Curators and Authors. A more detailed schedule will be posted shortly.

Fred Johnston learned to make pots in the Seagrove area in the 1980’s. Working odd jobs around the different potteries, he worked for many of the old Seagrove pottery families: Owen, Teague, Chrisco, and McCanless. This experience was the catalyst for Johnston’s commitment and passion to the pottery vernacular, which turned into an adventure and education. After attending Montgomery Community College, Johnston went on to attend the New York State School of Ceramics at Alfred University where he received a BFA with honors and then a MFA from the College of Art & Architecture at Penn State University. He was artist in resident at Arrowmont School of Arts in Tennessee, the Sanbao Ceramic Institute in Jingdezhen, China and  ArtLink in Tallin, Estonia. In 1997. Johnston and his wife Carol Gentithes established Johnston & Gentithes Art Pottery in Seagrove, NC, where they presently make and sell their work. His work is exhibited nationally and internationally and is in the permanent collection of the North Carolina Pottery Center, the Hermitage Museum and Mint Museum.

Schedule: 7 to 9pm, Friday, Oct. 17, 2014.

Meet & Greet from 7 to 8pm, a social hour, with a slide presentation to follow.

Location – NCPC Educational Building located behind the NCPC at 233 East Avenue, Seagrove, 27341

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Windgate Charitable Foundation, and the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., 10am – 4pm. For more information, please call 336/873-8430, visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org), or find us on Facebook.

North Carolina Pottery Center’s 15th Annual Gala and Auction Was A Fun Success

October 7, 2014

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The North Carolina Pottery Center’s 15th Annual Gala & Auction – “Going, Going, Gone to Pots!” – held on Saturday evening, Sept. 20, 2014, at the Contemporary Art Museum in downtown Raleigh, NC, was a fun-filled evening and a great success! The event raised over $90,000, with net proceeds of $76,500. The amount raised this year is the most that the Pottery Center has ever raised with one of its annual gala and auctions.

Executive Director Lindsey Lambert notes, “Our annual auction and gala is an integral part of our annual funding, so to have an exceptionally successful event such as this, raising more than ever before, is especially satisfying and allows us a little more flexibility in finding ways to better achieve our goals. This couldn’t have happened without a great group of sponsors, hosts, attendees, auction steering and committee members, others who donated or contributed in other ways, and, most importantly, this event could not have happened without all of the great potters who donated their pots, time, and enthusiasm to the event! We are deeply appreciative of their support for the Pottery Center and will continually strive to find ways to better fulfill our mission.”

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Funding raised by the event will be used to help support the center’s mission of promoting awareness and appreciation of the history, heritage and ongoing tradition of pottery and pottery making in North Carolina through exhibitions, educational programming, and special events.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Windgate Charitable Foundation, and the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., 10am – 4pm. For more information, please call 336/873.8430, visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org), or find us on Facebook.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, to Host Book Discussion, Signing and Pottery Identification – Sept. 13, 2014

September 6, 2014

NCPClogosmall

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, will host a book discussion, signing, and pottery identification event for “It’s Just Dirt! The Historic Art Potteries of North Carolina’s Seagrove Region,” by Stephen C. Compton (author) on Sept. 13, 2014.

Saturday, Sept. 13, 2014, schedule:

11am – 11:20am – Book Discussion

11:20am – noon – Book Signing

Noon – 2pm – Pottery Identification (Maximum 3 Pieces)

Light refreshments will be served. The event is free to the public, with donations encouraged.

Steve Compton (Raleigh, NC) is an avid collector of historic North Carolina Pottery. The author of numerous articles related to NC potters and potteries, Compton is also the author of “North Carolina Pottery: Earthenware, Stoneware and Fancyware” and “Seagrove Potteries Through Time”. Formerly the President of the NCPC Board of Directors, Compton is a founding member of the North Carolina Collectors’ Guild, serves on the North Carolina Pottery Center Board and is the current chair of its exhibition committee.

According to Compton, “Located near the geographic heart of North Carolina, Seagrove is known as the pottery town. Though not the only place where pottery has been made in the state, when you say Seagrove to people, they suspect that you’re talking about pottery. From its modest 18th century beginnings with a few Quaker potters from Pennsylvania and Nantucket, the Seagrove region today hosts more than one hundred potters. This is its history.” All of Compton’s books, including this newest one, will be available for purchase in the Pottery Center gift shop on Sept. 13.

An eighth generation North Carolinian, Compton’s interests include the state’s 18th and 19th century earthenware and stoneware traditions, as well as its early to mid-20th century art potteries, and how these traditions inform the work of hundreds of the state’s contemporary clay artists today.

The North Carolina Pottery Center is proud to present this educational and entertaining event to the public. We encourage you to bring in old North Carolina pottery pieces to find out more about them.

Currently on view at the Pottery Center is “Many Faces: North Carolina’s Face Jug Tradition,” curated by L.A. Rhyne, on view through Oct. 25, 2014. The exhibition explores a fascinating group of 19th and 20th century face vessels made by many traditional and contemporary folk artists.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Windgate Charitable Foundation, and the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430, visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org), or find us on Facebook.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Welcomes Josh Floyd as Artist-in-Residence

August 30, 2014

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The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is pleased to announce the addition of Josh Floyd as our new Artist-in-Residence. Grant funding from the Wingate Charitable Foundation is allowing the center to restart its Artist-in-Residence (AiR) program.

Floyd comes to the center with a Bachelor of Arts with Art Concentration from Fairmont State University in West Virginia, and he has been making pots for over ten years. He studied for two years as an Artist-in-Residence at the Cub Creek Foundation in Appomattox, VA, and has worked two years as a studio and gallery assistant for Smicksburg Pottery in Pennsylvania. He has also been a studio assistant at the Penland School of Craft. Before accepting the position as the North Carolina Pottery Center’s AiR, he was working for the Laguna Clay Company in Byesville, OH, testing clays and glazes. While he enjoyed working for Laguna Clay, Floyd’s goal was to return to the studio, something which the Pottery Center’s AiR program allows him to do.

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Floyd characterizes his style as “striving to create beautiful and comfortable pots and aspiring to make work that will be used in the home, for coffee with friends or evening tea after a long day. I want my work to make it to the front of the cabinet and to survive a tumble about in the sink.”

Describing his inspirations for pottery, Floyd says, “I am drawn to the patinas of old, rusted cars in a field, or old barns in some state of disrepair, but still standing. A fondness for the past certainly finds its way into my pots as I reference crocks and jugs of early America. I am drawn not only to the simplicity and strength of the forms but to the ideas of local production and necessity. While industrial processes and societal norms have changed our needs, there is still a beauty in well made handcrafted items that will stand the test of time. Referencing these forms is not a desire to copy them but to find my own voice within them.”

The Pottery Center is looking forward to having Floyd as its AiR for the next two years. Lindsey Lambert, executive director, says, “Having Josh as our new AiR is literally a breath of fresh air.” Between Josh and our new Educational Program Manager and Project Coordinator, Emily Lassiter, we are looking to begin offering more educational programs and workshops, things which help us better fulfill our mission of promoting awareness and appreciation of the history, heritage and ongoing tradition of pottery making in our great state.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Windgate Charitable Foundation, and the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

NCPC-entrance

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue – Sat 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430, visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org), or find us on Facebook.

Mobile Anagama Kiln Firing at the NC Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC – Aug. 19. 2014

August 15, 2014

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Henry Crissman, a graduate Student at The NYSCC at Alfred University persuing a MFA in Ceramics, and his “Mighty Mobile Anagama” kiln are heading east from Montana and are projected to arrive in Seagrove, NC, early next week and fire his mobile kiln at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, on Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, barring unforeseen circumstances. Crissman’s mobile anagama is a wood-fired kiln on a trailer he created with plenty of funding and assistance that is now on the last leg of a whirlwind national tour of kiln firings and exploring ceramics as community activism for the past month.

Says Crissman, “My art practice is an exploration of the progressive social applications of making and using functional pottery…” His mobile anagama wood-fired kiln allows for the hosting of more communal and performative approaches to the ceramic process.

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The re-assembly, loading, and firing of Henry’s moblie anagama kiln will take place at the North Carolina Pottery Center on Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014, starting at 9am. This will be a day long process. The unloading of the fired kiln will take place on Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014.

The public is invited to come out and watch the process both days. There will be no charge to the public to come out and watch the loading/firing process on Tuesday or the unloading on Wednesday, but the center will be charging its usual modest admission fee to tour the museum on those days for visitors wishing to do that as well.

This will also be a great opportunity to meet a couple of new addtions at the Pottery Center: Josh Floyd, the center’s Artist-in-Residence, and Emily Lassiter, the center’s Educational Program Manager and Project Coordinator.

To learn more about the “Mobile Anagama,” visit Crissman’s website at (www.henrycrissman.com).

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Windgate Charitable Foundation, and the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873.8430, visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org), or find us on Facebook.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Hires Emily Lassiter as Educational Program Manager and Project Coordinator

July 29, 2014

NCPClogosmall

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is pleased to announce the addition of Emily Lassiter as our new Educational Program Manager & Project Coordinator. A native of Burlington, NC, Lassiter also has local ties to Star, NC, and Troy, NC, as her grandparents grew up in the area. She comes to us with a BA in History from UNC-CH and a MA in Public History with a concentration in Museum Studies from UNCG.

814NCPC-Emily-Lassiter

Lassiter has worked as an AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer at the Pearl S. Buck Birthplace and Pocahontas County Chamber of Commerce, both in WV. While working in WV, she secured and administered a grant that facilitated magazine and newspaper advertising, as well as coordinated volunteers for the West Virginia Roadkill Cook-off. She has also worked at Korner’s Folly in Kernersville, NC, where she worked with development and membership issues, and at the Guilford Courthouse National Military Park in Greensboro, NC, where she gained valuable experience with visitor services, educational tours and historic interpretation.

Lassiter is a member of the National Council on Public History, the American Association of State and Local History, and the North Carolina Museums Council. Regarding her new position with the Pottery Center and pottery in North Carolina, Lassiter says, “I am looking forward to helping promote awareness and appreciation of North Carolina pottery and potters through a variety of educational programming. North Carolina has such a rich tradition of pottery, and it is important to share that with people through exhibitions, workshops and interactive activities.” She brings with her an energetic, enthusiastic spirit and strong desire to learn and help others.

Funding for the educational program manager portion of the position comes from a grant from the Windgate Charitable Foundation.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Windgate Charitable Foundation, and the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., 10am-4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430, visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org), or find us on Facebook.

East Carolina University Students Fire the Groundhog Kiln at North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC – Aug. 1, 2014

July 23, 2014

NCPClogosmall

Join us at the North Carolina Pottery Center, in Seagrove, NC, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014, to learn about the wood firing process with East Carolina University students as they fire the groundhog kiln on the pottery center lawn. Also, on Saturday, Aug. 2, there will be a Raku firing demonstration at the center.

These two days of firings are the finale of the summer internships conducted at the NC Pottery Center by East Carolina University Ceramics Graduate students Erin Younge and Devin McKim. They will be available to explain the process and answer questions from 10am – 4pm on Friday and Saturday.

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Left to Right: Joseph Sands, Devin McKim, & Erin Younge

As part of an on-going collaboration between the NC Pottery Center and East Carolina University, Erin Younge, a 3rd year graduate student in ECU’s Ceramics Program, has been interning with us this summer and teaching a number of clay programs for all ages. Devin McKim is a 2nd year graduate student who has been working with local Randleman, NC, potter Joseph Sands to learn production ceramic techniques.

The firing of the groundhog kiln takes approximately 15 hours and uses 2 cords of wood. “Firing a groundhog kiln is a great introduction to Seagrove pottery,” explains Devin. “I am excited to be joining in on that traditional style of salt firing.”

The Raku firing will be broken up into smaller, more manageable batches to fire, remove, and fume – and then repeat with each following batch. That will give visitors a chance to see finished pieces more quickly than most other types of firings. Erin says, “I am amazed by the range of color that Raku firings produce. The transformation that takes place in both the clay and the glaze by using simple combustible materials like sawdust or flowers is always a treat.”

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the John W. & Anna H. Hanes Foundation, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue – Sat 10 am – 4 pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

The Seagrove Potters of Historic Busbee Road in Seagrove, NC, will Present “Summer Solstice” – June 21, 2014

May 9, 2014

The Seagrove Potters of Historic Busbee Road in Seagrove, NC, will be hosting an event on Saturday, June, 21, 2014, for Summer Solstice – the longest day of the year, from 9am-7pm.

Participants include:

STUDIO TOUYA will be open from 10am-7pm, with refreshments served.

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CHRIS LUTHER will begin the first day of summer serving coffee and local breads with demonstrations scheduled throughout the day for visitors.

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MILL CREEK FORGE is open from 9:30am-5pm offering iron wares.

HICKORY HILL will celebrate that summer has arrived. Check out our complete line of kitchenware and serving pieces that’s sure to compliment your summer entrees. Refreshments will be served . Hours from 9am-7pm.

O’QUINN POTTERY will be offering refreshments, door prizes and lots of pottery.

CADY CLAY WORKS will celebrate the year’s longest day with new pottery designs and refreshments. Join us for hors d’oeuvres on the patio from 5-7pm.

KEITH MARTINDALE POTTERY will be open from 9am-7pm offering a good selection of pottery. Refreshments will be served.

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“ORIGINAL” OWENS POTTERY will have a large stock of bird houses and bird feeders in celebration of Summer Solstice. We will also have flower pots and hanging baskets.

JUGTOWN POTTERY will celebrate the solstice with pottery and crafts for the home and garden. Evening refreshments served.

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JLK JEWELRY @ Jugtown Pottery will have a selection of nature theme jewelry, in addition to a variety of one of a kind pieces.

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For further info call Jennie Lorette Keatts at 910/464-2653 or e-mail to (jennie@jlkjewelry.com).

1000 Mugs to Build a Kiln and Workspace – Don’t You Want to be Part of This?

April 8, 2014

Some people use Kickstarter to fund a project, and some people offer an opportunity to invest in an artist’s future by pre-paying for art. I first heard of this from William Halsey, one of Charleston, SC’s, best artists. He would sell shares to raise funds for a trip and “investors” could use those shares to purchase works made as a result of those trips. A deal that turned out to be a pretty good investment for those who purchased those early works by Halsey.

Chad Brown, a 5th generation Seagrove, NC, potter is using a similar technique to help fund a new work space and kiln by selling 1000 mugs to fund his project.

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Work by Chad Brown

Here’s a letter from Chad Brown:

Dear Friends,

For the past 15 years, I have worked in many shops, attended craft shows, art exhibitions and worked at the North Carolina Pottery Center, in Seagrove, NC, as a demonstrator. During this time, I have been working out of a small shed on my grandparent’s farm that I built when I was in middle school, needless to say I have long outgrown it! Erin and I recently purchased a large track of land in Moore County near the site of my great-great grandfather W.H. Crisco’s kiln and shop. On this property, I am planning to build a large wood burning kiln, pole barn and workshop.

For funding to accomplish the construction, I am making 1,000 mugs, from local clays, to be sold for $25.00 each. Orders are being taken now and mugs can be picked up at our property May 31st and June 1st from 9-5. This will give you a chance to see the new kiln site. Mugs can also be shipped for an additional cost.

I appreciate your support.

Chad Brown

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Photo of my great-great grandfather, W.H. Crisco standing in front of his workshop which now resides in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, DC.

For further information or to order your mug(s) call 910/571-1691. Checks can be sent to: Chad Brown, PO Box 109 Ether, NC, 27247.

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Fires Groundhog Kiln – Mar. 22, 2014

March 17, 2014

NCPClogosmall

Join us at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Saturday, Mar. 22, 2014, to learn about the wood firing process with Seagrove potter Chad Brown as he fires the groundhog kiln on the pottery center lawn. Brown will be available to explain the process and answer questions from 10am-4pm. The firing of the groundhog kiln takes approximately 15 hours and uses 2 cords of wood.

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Brown says, “I learned a lot I didn’t expect to learn about this kiln, mostly because of its limitations. The kiln doesn’t have any bells and whistles like some of the other kilns I’ve fired. I’ve had to fight cold corners, no side stokes and major leaks. But now I’m getting consistent results that I am happy with. And when I do go back to firing a kiln with bells and whistles, I know how to better ring and toot ‘em!”

Brown is a 5th generation potter; his great-great grandfather was William Henry Chriscoe. He learned his technical skills in the more traditional Seagrove fashion, working for years as a production potter. He expanded his skills by working as a journeyman potter, traveling from studio to studio and turning the various forms required. Brown has participated in numerous wood firings with various potters including Sid Luck, Terry Hunt, David Stuempfle, Mark Hewitt and Donna Craven. He does turning demonstrations at the pottery center on most Saturdays.

While you are at the center, you can also explore the exhibit, “Teachers of Tradition: NC’s Folk Heritage Award-Winning Potters,” a temporary exhibition highlighting and honoring the exemplary work of thirteen of the state’s outstanding traditional potters. The exhibition opens with a reception on Saturday, Mar. 22, 2014 from noon-2pm. The North Carolina Pottery Center, located in Seagrove, NC, will be open to the public, free of charge, for the reception. The exhibition will run through Saturday, Apr. 26, 2014.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the John W. & Anna H. Hanes Foundation, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue.-Sat., 10am-4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).


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