Posts Tagged ‘Seagrove NC’

The Seagrove Potters of Historic Busbee Road in Seagrove, NC, will Present “Summer Solstice” – June 21, 2014

May 9, 2014

The Seagrove Potters of Historic Busbee Road in Seagrove, NC, will be hosting an event on Saturday, June, 21, 2014, for Summer Solstice – the longest day of the year, from 9am-7pm.

Participants include:

STUDIO TOUYA will be open from 10am-7pm, with refreshments served.

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CHRIS LUTHER will begin the first day of summer serving coffee and local breads with demonstrations scheduled throughout the day for visitors.

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MILL CREEK FORGE is open from 9:30am-5pm offering iron wares.

HICKORY HILL will celebrate that summer has arrived. Check out our complete line of kitchenware and serving pieces that’s sure to compliment your summer entrees. Refreshments will be served . Hours from 9am-7pm.

O’QUINN POTTERY will be offering refreshments, door prizes and lots of pottery.

CADY CLAY WORKS will celebrate the year’s longest day with new pottery designs and refreshments. Join us for hors d’oeuvres on the patio from 5-7pm.

KEITH MARTINDALE POTTERY will be open from 9am-7pm offering a good selection of pottery. Refreshments will be served.

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“ORIGINAL” OWENS POTTERY will have a large stock of bird houses and bird feeders in celebration of Summer Solstice. We will also have flower pots and hanging baskets.

JUGTOWN POTTERY will celebrate the solstice with pottery and crafts for the home and garden. Evening refreshments served.

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JLK JEWELRY @ Jugtown Pottery will have a selection of nature theme jewelry, in addition to a variety of one of a kind pieces.

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For further info call Jennie Lorette Keatts at 910/464-2653 or e-mail to (jennie@jlkjewelry.com).

1000 Mugs to Build a Kiln and Workspace – Don’t You Want to be Part of This?

April 8, 2014

Some people use Kickstarter to fund a project, and some people offer an opportunity to invest in an artist’s future by pre-paying for art. I first heard of this from William Halsey, one of Charleston, SC’s, best artists. He would sell shares to raise funds for a trip and “investors” could use those shares to purchase works made as a result of those trips. A deal that turned out to be a pretty good investment for those who purchased those early works by Halsey.

Chad Brown, a 5th generation Seagrove, NC, potter is using a similar technique to help fund a new work space and kiln by selling 1000 mugs to fund his project.

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Work by Chad Brown

Here’s a letter from Chad Brown:

Dear Friends,

For the past 15 years, I have worked in many shops, attended craft shows, art exhibitions and worked at the North Carolina Pottery Center, in Seagrove, NC, as a demonstrator. During this time, I have been working out of a small shed on my grandparent’s farm that I built when I was in middle school, needless to say I have long outgrown it! Erin and I recently purchased a large track of land in Moore County near the site of my great-great grandfather W.H. Crisco’s kiln and shop. On this property, I am planning to build a large wood burning kiln, pole barn and workshop.

For funding to accomplish the construction, I am making 1,000 mugs, from local clays, to be sold for $25.00 each. Orders are being taken now and mugs can be picked up at our property May 31st and June 1st from 9-5. This will give you a chance to see the new kiln site. Mugs can also be shipped for an additional cost.

I appreciate your support.

Chad Brown

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Photo of my great-great grandfather, W.H. Crisco standing in front of his workshop which now resides in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, DC.

For further information or to order your mug(s) call 910/571-1691. Checks can be sent to: Chad Brown, PO Box 109 Ether, NC, 27247.

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Fires Groundhog Kiln – Mar. 22, 2014

March 17, 2014

NCPClogosmall

Join us at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Saturday, Mar. 22, 2014, to learn about the wood firing process with Seagrove potter Chad Brown as he fires the groundhog kiln on the pottery center lawn. Brown will be available to explain the process and answer questions from 10am-4pm. The firing of the groundhog kiln takes approximately 15 hours and uses 2 cords of wood.

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Brown says, “I learned a lot I didn’t expect to learn about this kiln, mostly because of its limitations. The kiln doesn’t have any bells and whistles like some of the other kilns I’ve fired. I’ve had to fight cold corners, no side stokes and major leaks. But now I’m getting consistent results that I am happy with. And when I do go back to firing a kiln with bells and whistles, I know how to better ring and toot ‘em!”

Brown is a 5th generation potter; his great-great grandfather was William Henry Chriscoe. He learned his technical skills in the more traditional Seagrove fashion, working for years as a production potter. He expanded his skills by working as a journeyman potter, traveling from studio to studio and turning the various forms required. Brown has participated in numerous wood firings with various potters including Sid Luck, Terry Hunt, David Stuempfle, Mark Hewitt and Donna Craven. He does turning demonstrations at the pottery center on most Saturdays.

While you are at the center, you can also explore the exhibit, “Teachers of Tradition: NC’s Folk Heritage Award-Winning Potters,” a temporary exhibition highlighting and honoring the exemplary work of thirteen of the state’s outstanding traditional potters. The exhibition opens with a reception on Saturday, Mar. 22, 2014 from noon-2pm. The North Carolina Pottery Center, located in Seagrove, NC, will be open to the public, free of charge, for the reception. The exhibition will run through Saturday, Apr. 26, 2014.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the John W. & Anna H. Hanes Foundation, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue.-Sat., 10am-4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

Dirtworks Pottery in Seagrove, NC, Celebrates 25th Anniversary – Mar. 29, 2014

March 14, 2014

Dirtworks Pottery in Seagrove, NC, will celebrate its fourth annual 25th anniversary on Mar. 29, 2014, from 10am to 4pm. Potter Dan Triece will celebrate the day with horse hair and raku demonstrations. Special, limited numbered pieces will be available for purchase. Refreshments will be served and special discount pricing will be available during the event.

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Triece began his pottery journey in 1983 when he took his first pottery class at Montgomery Technical College in pursuit of a fun hobby. He eventually began teaching evening classes at MTC. During his last semester, he began turning pots for David Garner at Turn and Burn Pottery.

Shortly thereafter, a gallery in Charlotte, NC, invited Triece to be the 3-dimensional artist in a special exhibit.  The exhibit was a huge success, and Triece decided to focus all his energy on pottery. He made pots in his hometown, Kannapolis, NC, for several years before opening a shop in Seagrove in the early 1990s.

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Dan Triece with Duke

“When I found pottery, it was just the perfect fit,” said Triece. “You’re working inside and outside, and doing different things all the time.”

DirtWorks is located at 1226 NC Highway 705 – the Pottery Highway.

For more information, call 336/873-8979.

Pottery Road Studio & Gallery in Seagrove, NC, Holds a Winter Sale – Feb. 1, 2014

January 30, 2014

Pottery Road Studio & Gallery is fairly new to Seagrove, NC, but Don and Susan Walton, the potters who run the gallery are not newcomers by any means. The shop is located at 1387 Highway 705 South, the same location that housed Walton’s Pottery for many years before the Waltons took some time away from pottery to focus on another creative business, Rubber Stamp Tapestry.

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Pottery Road Studio is now home to both Walton’s Pottery and Rubber Stamp Tapestry, and also features functional and contemporary pottery created by other artists.

The gallery will host its Winter Sale on Feb. 1, 2014, from 10am to 5pm. This is the only time of year they mark many items down in order to move out the old and bring in the new. In the spirit of recycling, there will also be some great deals on not-so-perfect pottery that has been saved throughout the past year.

For more information, visit (www.PotteryRoad.com) or call 910/464-2608.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Receives $130,000 Grant From Windgate Charitable Foundation

December 20, 2013

NCPClogosmall

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a $130,000 grant from the Windgate Charitable Foundation, a private charitable foundation based in Arkansas. The Windgate Charitable Foundation is well-known for its support of institutions and programs which focus on crafts and craft education.

The grant will be dispersed and utilized over a two-year period, allowing for renovations and upgrades to the Voncannon House (a Victorian house on Pottery Center property), restarting the Artist-in-Residence program, funding a part-time Educational Program Manager position for two years, educational programming and associated costs, and technology upgrades.

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Pottery Center Executive Director, Lindsey Lambert says, “Making necessary repairs and upgrades to the Voncannon House will enable us to accommodate our Artist-in-Residence. We will also be able to house periodic on-site interns from East Carolina University, with whom we are collaborating. We anticipate selecting our first new Artist-in-Residence in late spring and having that person start their residency by early June. We also anticipate having one or two graduate students from ECU’s Ceramics Program intern with us during the summer of 2014.” The Pottery Center is in the second year of a collaborative relationship with East Carolina University’s Ceramics Program.

Michael Drought, Director of ECU’s School of Art and Design, notes, “The collaboration between the Pottery Center and ECU’s School of Art and Design, with the support of the College of Fine Arts and Communication, will offer educational opportunities for ECU students via internships, research and exhibition, as well as provide university-level courses for the Seagrove community. This will highlight the strengths and significance of the two institutions and provide a platform for the further development of summer courses, conferences and symposiums.”

Lambert adds, “The Board and I believe that a dynamic Artist-in-Residence program and a strong collaboration with East Carolina University will revitalize the Pottery Center. Youthful energy and a steady relationship with a major educational institution will allow us to more vigorously fulfill our mission. We promote public awareness and appreciation of the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina through educational programs, public services, collection and preservation, and research and documentation.” A part-time Educational Program Manager will allow the Pottery Center to create more educational programming and outreach activities which help children and adults appreciate the world-class clay tradition that is so much a part of North Carolina’s cultural identity. Technology upgrades will allow the center to function more efficiently in serving the potters and pottery lovers of North Carolina.

Says Lambert, “I am very appreciative of the generosity of the Windgate Charitable Foundation, and we are honored by the trust they have placed in us here at the North Carolina Pottery Center. I believe that this is just the first of other grants that the center will receive in the coming years. While we are starting to receive additional funding from granting sources, it is paramount that our membership and supporters not become complacent. Having a strong, enthusiastic, and financially supportive membership is crucial to the long-term success of the Pottery Center. Simply stated, we need and appreciate your financial and personal support now more ever.”

The North Carolina Pottery Center will be closed Mon.-Thur., Dec. 23-26, 2013 for Christmas, closing at 1pm on Tue., Dec. 31 and closed on Wed., Jan. 1, 2014 for New Year’s Day. Happy holidays and best wishes to all.

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tues.–Sat., from 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430, visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org), or find us on Facebook.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Special Programs to Accompany the Foodwares Exhibition

September 11, 2013

NCPClogosmall

Three special programs are planned by North Carolina Pottery Center (NCPC) in Seagrove, NC, to go along with the “Foodwares: Pottery for Storage and Preparation of Food” exhibition that is on display through Oct. 26, 2013.

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Works from Cady Clay Works

On Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013, noted food historian and hearth cook Kay Moss from Gastonia, NC, will be at NCPC presenting a talk about early hearth cookery in the 18th and early 19th centuries, showing how the pottery from that time played an important role in cooking. Moss will present her talk twice that day, once at 11:30am and once at 2pm.

Moss is both an historian and a hands-on hearth cook. She was the founder of the 18th century Backcountry Lifeways Studies Program at the Schiele Museum in Gastonia, NC, and remained the head of that program for many years before her retirement, a retirement which hardly seems less active than her work years! “The Backcountry Housewife,” which Kay Moss co-wrote with Kathryn Hoffman, continues to be a must-have for hearth cooks in the southeastern US. Moss also is the author of “Decorative Motifs from the Southern Backcountry”, “Journey to the Piedmont Past, Southern Folk Medicine 1750-1820″ (a sometimes horrifying scholarly study of early medical practices), and her latest book just released by the University of South Carolina Press, “Seeking the Historical Cook: Exploring Eighteenth-Century Southern Foodways”.

In addition to her scholarly work, Moss still teaches hearth cooking skills at the John C. Campbell Folk School in western North Carolina. Her many years of study and practice have made her an expert on that subject.

Moss’s easygoing manner encourages her audiences to ask questions about early food history. Visitors will learn about the cooking practices of their ancestors and may even go home more knowledgeable about how to cook when the power goes off!

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Work by Tom Gray

Then on Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013, there will be two programs:

From 11-11:30am, Benjamin Grandon, an agent with the NC Cooperative Extension Service of Randolph County, will be giving a presentation titled “Local Foods and Community Supported Agriculture: How North Carolinians can help North Carolina.” Learn about what is grown in North Carolina, the Local Foods and Farm to Table initiatives in our state and how to find out and support local farmer wherever you live. Grandon has extensive knowledge of crops and gardens all over the state. Are you a locovore? Come find out!

From 2-4pm, Venice Willett, a volunteer with the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service at the Randolph County Center, will be at the center cooking foods in pottery, using a tabletop oven. Willett has cooked in pottery dishes for many years, and is one of the Randolph County Cooperative Extension Service’s most knowledgeable volunteers. She will share with you her excitement about cooking, as well as an enthusiasm for all the wonderful pottery foodwares made in the state of North Carolina. Willett will also give out recipes and offer tastes of some of the dishes.

The North Carolina Pottery Center will be open at no charge to the public for these events, though donations are always welcome and appreciated.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the John W. & Anna H. Hanes Foundation, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue.-Sat., 10am – 4pm.

For more information, call NCPC at 336/873-8430, check the website at (www.ncpotterycenter.com), or visit the North Carolina Pottery Center’s Facebook page.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Family Day, on Sept. 21, 2013, in Celebration of Seagrove’s Centennial

August 30, 2013

NCPClogosmall

On Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, the town of Seagrove, NC, is celebrating its centennial anniversary with a Centennial Celebration. Wishing to contribute to the day’s celebration of the area’s history and the festive atmosphere of the occasion, the North Carolina Pottery Center is having a Family Day on Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, in cooperation with Seagrove’s Centennial Celebration.

The North Carolina Pottery Center will be contributing to the day by showcasing the tradition of pottery through demonstrations and other activities! Please join us as we help to celebrate Seagrove’s 100th anniversary.

All NCPC activities will be taking place on NCPC property except for the 12:00-2:30pm NCPC booth at the Seagrove Centennial Celebration. Alcohol, tobacco, firearms, and other weapons are prohibited. No pets, with the exception of service animals, will be allowed onsite on Family Day due to liability issues.

It is recommend that attendees bring folding chairs, blankets, etc. as some of the day’s activities will be located outside.

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Schedule of North Carolina Pottery Center Activities on Family Day, Saturday, September 21, 2013, include:

12:00-2:30pm – Pottery Identification by Dr. Terry Zug and Steve Compton (Inside the NCPC). Dr. Terry Zug is a pottery expert who is the former chair of Southern Folklore at UNC-Chapel Hill and author of “Turners and Burners: The Folk Potters of North Carolina”. Steve Compton is an avid longtime pottery collector who was the first president of the North Carolina Pottery Collectors’ Guild.
· Maximum of three pottery pieces per person.
· Donations are welcomed and encouraged, but not mandatory, for this service. Suggested donation: $5.

12:00-2:30pm – Pottery Ornaments for Kids & General Info with Seo Eo and his students (NCPC Booth at the Seagrove Centennial Celebration on Old Plank Road). Seo Eo, an Associate Professor of Ceramics at East Carolina University, and some of his students will be helping kids paint bisque ornaments.
· Free – Donations are welcomed.

12:15– 2:15pm – Native American Pottery Demo by Caroleen Sanders (On the grounds of the NCPC). A Catawba Indian master potter, Caroleen Sanders, learned to make pottery in the traditional Catawba method by watching her mother and other family members and will be demonstrating her craft for visitors.
· Free

1:15 – 3:15pm – Raku Firing Demo by David Garner & Dan Triece (On the grounds of the NCPC). David Garner is a life-long local potter who has stretched his creative boundaries and is known for his horsehair and Raku pottery. Garner is the owner of Turn & Burn Pottery in Seagrove. Dan Triece is another local potter who makes use of a variety of colors and glaze combinations and is known for his copper luster Raku pottery. Triece is the owner of DirtWorks Pottery in Seagrove, N.C.
· Free

2 – 3pm – Pottery Turning Demonstration by Chad Brown (NCPC Education Building). Chad Brown is a local 5th generation potter who is recognized as an up and coming potter and who has been invited to show at this year’s Potters Market Invitational in Charlotte, NC, on Sept. 7, 2013. Brown has purchased some land recently and is also in the process of building a kiln.
· Free

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3:30 – 4:30pm – Agate-ware Turning Demo by Eck McCanless (NCPC Education Building). Eck McCanless, a local potter, has been turning pots since the age of 18 and is known for his distinctive “agateware” pottery. He and his family were the subjects of Jim Sharkey’s film, “The Fourteenth Shop”, which won the Award for Creative Excellence at the 2002 International Film and Video Festival in Redondo Beach, CA. McCanless is the owner of Eck McCanless Pottery in Seagrove.
· Free

5:00-7pm – Evening Festivities (On the grounds of the NCPC).
· Music – Bluegrass Experience. The Bluegrass Experience, one of the Southeast’s most respected traditional music groups.
· Food – BBQ sandwiches, fixings, dessert and drinks. (While quantities last – Donations are welcomed.)

This schedule of events is subject to modification by the North Carolina Potter Center. Inclement weather may affect the feasibility of some activities.

For more information about the schedule of activities (parade, booths on Old Plank Road, historical displays, etc.) being undertaken by the Seagrove Centennial Celebration, please visit the “Seagrove NC Centennial” page on Facebook.

The North Carolina Pottery Center looks forward to adding to a fun and festive atmosphere and celebration of Seagrove’s 100th anniversary!

North Carolina Pottery Center activities and projects are supported, in part, by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tuesday – Saturday from 10 am – 4 pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430, visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org) or on Facebook.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Groundhog Wood Firing – Aug. 31, 2013

August 30, 2013

NCPClogosmall

Join us at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, to learn about the  groundhog wood firing process with Seagrove potter Chad Brown as he fires the groundhog kiln on the pottery center lawn. Brown will be available to explain the groundhog wood firing process and answer questions from 10am – 4pm.  Seagrove potters Chad Brown and Sid Luck have been working recently on making some necessary repairs to the groundhog kiln, and the kiln is now ready for firing again. The firing of the groundhog kiln takes approximately 15 hours and uses 2 cords of wood.

Brown is a 5th generation potter; his great-great grandfather was William Henry Chriscoe. Brown learned his technical skills in the more traditional Seagrove fashion, working for years as a production potter for many studios. He expanded his skills by working as a journeyman potter, traveling from studio to studio and turning the various shapes required. Brown has participated in numerous wood firings with various potters including Sid Luck, Terry Hunt, David Stuempfle, Mark Hewitt and Donna Craven. He does turning demonstrations at the pottery center on most Saturdays. This year, Brown has been invited to show at the 9th Annual Potters Market Invitational held at the Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC on Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013.

While you are at the center, you can also explore our current temporary exhibition, “Foodwares: Pottery for Storage and Preparation of Food.” Pottery and food – What a natural combination! Art in everyday life is highlighted in the NCPC exhibition of NC pottery used for food storage, food preparation, and cooking. One half of the wares displayed are historical, the rest are contemporary. This exhibition, curated by Mary Farrell of Westmoore Pottery, runs through Oct. 26, 2013.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the John W. & Anna H. Hanes Foundation, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue – Sat 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Pottery Lecture by Dr. John Burrison – Aug. 4, 2013

July 9, 2013

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Dr. John Burrison from Georgia State University in Atlanta, GA, will be delivering a special presentation entitled “Clay Nation: Traditional Folk Pottery of the United States” at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, on Aug. 4, 2013, from 2-4pm.

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Dr. Burrison has a Ph.D. in Folklore and Folklife from the University of Pennsylvania and is Regents Professor and director of the Folklore Curriculum at Georgia State University in Atlanta. He is curator of the permanent exhibition “Shaping Traditions: Folk Arts in a Changing South” in the Atlanta History Museum and of the Folk Pottery Museum of Northeast Georgia at Sautee Nacoochee. His publications include “Brothers in Clay: The Story of Georgia Folk Pottery” (1983 and later editions); “From Mud to Jug: The Folk Potters and Pottery of Northeast Georgia” (2010); “Fluid Vessel: Journey of the Jug,” Ceramics in America (2006); “The Living Tradition of English Country Pottery,” Folk Life (1997-98); “Survivors: The Country Potters of Post-Industrial England,” The Studio Potter (1997), and the “Pottery” entries in The Greenwood Encyclopedia of African American Folklore, Encyclopedia of Applachia, and Encyclopedia of Southern Culture.

This event is free and open to the public. An RSVP is not required to attend this event, but would be appreciated. You may RSVP either via our Facebook page or by e-mailing to (info@ncpotterycenter.org).

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

NCPC-entrance

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue.-Sat., from 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).


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