Asheville Art Museum in Asheville, NC, Offers Film Series in Conjunction with Abstract Exhibit

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As part of the its commitment to new media and education through film, the Asheville Art Museum in Asheville, NC, has curated a series of art house documentaries that intimately explore the lives and careers of several artists represented in the exhibition “What You See Is What You See: American Abstraction After 1950”. These films, which range in length and documentary style, were created by independent filmmakers and serve as serious artistic and, at times, experimental works. Documentary films, strictly speaking, are non-fictional, factual works of art, sometimes known as cinema verite.

The ten films presented in the Museum’s New Media Gallery over a ten-week period serve as both educational tools to enhance our understanding of American Abstraction, as well as artistic representations of the subject matter as presented by the filmmakers. In particular, the directors have taken creative license to present true stories in a manner in which he or she seems fitting; often blurring the line between documentary and narrative with elements that are expressive, poetic, rhetorical, historical and subjective.

The films listed below will be screened daily at 11am, 1pm and 3pm.

JANUARY 6–11
“Josef Albers: To Open Eyes”
(1962) by The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 32 minutes

JANUARY 13–18
“Robert Motherwell and the New York School: Storming the Citadel”
(2010) by Catherine Tatge, 55 minutes

JANUARY 20–25
“Jules Olitski: Modern Master”
by Andy Reichsman and Kate Purdie, 22 minutes

JANUARY 27–FEBRUARY 1
“Joseph Fiore: The Nature of the Artist”
(2013) by Kane-Lewis Productions, 30 minutes

FEBRUARY 2–8
“Frankenthaler: Toward a New Climate”
(1978) by Perry Miller Adato, 28 minutes

FEBRUARY 10–15
“George Bireline”
(2002) by Neal Hutcheson, 28 minutes

FEBRUARY 17–22
“Julian Stanczak and Op Art: The Perceptive Eye”
(2001) by Barbara Stanczak, 60 minutes

FEBRUARY 24–MARCH 1
“Painters Painting”
(1973) by Emile de Antonio, 116 minutes

MARCH 3–8
“Sam Gilliam Interview”
(2004) by Netropolitan, 44 minutes

MARCH 10–15
“American Art of the 1960s”
(1972) by Michael Blackwood, 57 minutes

Founded by artists in 1948 in Asheville, NC, the Asheville Art Museum annually presents an exciting, inviting and active schedule of exhibitions and public programs based on its permanent collection of 20th and 21st century American art. Any visit will also include experiences with works of significance to Western North Carolina’s cultural heritage including Studio Craft, Black Mountain College and Cherokee artists. Special exhibitions feature renowned regional and national artists and explore issues of enduring interest. The Museum also offers a wide array of innovative, inspiring and entertaining educational programs for people of all ages.

Additional information on upcoming exhibitions and public programs at the Museum can be found online at (www.ashevilleart.org).

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