Hurricanes Have Victims, But the Media Hurts Many More

When a hurricane comes to an area, it leaves many victims in its path, but not all are wiped out of commission, but media reports of disasters can leave all in the path of their destruction. I learned this during Hurricane Hugo and I see it happening again during the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew.

I live 45 miles North-West of Charleston, SC, and had power until 11:30am Saturday, Oct., 8, 2016, when Hurricane Matthew had already come to the Charleston area and headed to North Carolina where it really did some of the worst damage in the form of rain and flooding in the US. I heard the weather folks tell us that Matthew could do more damage than Hugo in Charleston and then they went on to the next place the storm was headed. They never seem to follow up on anything but damage done. They’ll search and search until they can find that one place to stand in front of and show a huge tree down on a house or cars floating in water. They don’t come back and show what wasn’t harmed.

I feel sorry for those who suffered damage, those who are still suffering and those who may still feel damage from this hurricane. But this isn’t Haiti. Americans recover from damage much more quickly from tragedy and have the capacity to take a hit and at the same time help others.

I recently made a trip to downtown Charleston on Oct. 10, just a few days after the arrival of Hurricane Matthew and I was amazed at how little signs of damage was seen just a few days later – unlike Hurricane Hugo. Here’s a few notices I’ve received that represent pleas from folks who did not suffer damage from the storm, but don’t want people to forget them.

A Letter from Charleston, SC, from Hagan Fine Art Gallery and Studio, located at 27 1/2 State Street, in the heart of the French Quarter area of historic Charleston, SC.

Thank you for your calls and e-mails of support!

Dear Friends,

We’d like to give you an update on what’s going on in Charleston right now.  In general, we all feel very lucky to have homes and businesses to walk back into with little or no damage from Hurricane Matthew. However, there are many people here that are still struggling with no power and damaged homes.  Our pretty little State Street remained high and dry during the storm, and the gallery and paintings are all safe.  Our staff’s homes are all safe and standing. Some of us are still waiting on electricity, but we are all okay and very thankful. Most streets in Downtown Charleston that I’ve been on are dry and passable. Whew… we were spared.

We had just hung Dee Beard Dean and John Beard’s new paintings, when we heard the news of Hurricane Matthew’s approach. So we had to hurry and un-hang the show and store it safely away.  Dee and John’s Show and the Charleston Gallery Association’s Artwalk were cancelled and we covered everything in plastic.  It was an anxious time for everyone in Charleston.

Dee and John have been working on their show for many months, and it was (and still is) so very beautiful. It’s a really awesome thing to be witness to such a family of talent, inspiration and training by seeing these paintings in person and to know the artist who created these works so well.  We have found the paintings to feel calming, relaxing and soothing.

If you need a brief diversion from all the news of the Hurricane maybe you’ll enjoy looking at the paintings or this short video at (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyQLfsrNQtI&feature=youtu.be).

We wish you a speedy recovery if you’re dealing with the aftermath of the storm. If you need any help, please let us know. I have a car full of tarps and plastic, and I’ll deliver if you need them.

If you’re far, far away and you’re getting this – hopefully you’re safe and sound and you’ll enjoy looking and supporting these artists who have worked so hard for their show.  By the way, both Dee’s and John’s homes (as are they) are safe. We were anxious because they both are near the water and John actually lives on a boat in Florida.

If you see a painting you can’t live without, the gallery will extend free shipping on your choices through Sunday at 5PM and we will add a copy of Dee’s beautiful book with the purchase of any of her paintings.

Artwalk (the Charleston Gallery Association first Friday ArttWalk) has been rescheduled for this Friday, October 14th from 5-8pm. Please join us on Friday night in raising a glass to John and Dee and the invincible spirit of Charleston.

Warm wishes, Karen Hagan

For further info call 843/754-0494 or visit (www.HaganFineArt.com).

Here’s a notice from the Franklin G. Burroughs – Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum, located at 3100 S. Ocean Blvd. in Myrtle Beach, SC.

The Museum is Fine and Will Re-open Wednesday, October 12, 2016, at 10am.

If you saw the photos of the damaged Springmaid Pier and worried that the Art Museum was in the same condition – relax.  Aside from a few missing shingles and pieces of siding, the Museum came through Matthew relatively unscathed.  Power returned on Tuesday and we will open with regular Museum hours on Wednesday, October 12th, 2016.  We can’t express enough our gratitude to the City of Myrtle Beach for their help with our outdoor issues.

On exhibit is the “39th Annual South Carolina Watermedia Society Juried Exhibition”. Celia Pearson’s “Layerings: A Glimpse of Southeast Asia” will re-open shortly. The delayed opening for “Logan Woodle: Blessed Burdens” will be Tuesday, October 18th from 5:30 – 7:30pm, featuring a Gallery Talk by the artist.

If you have questions about any other events or the Museum itself, please contact us via our website at (www.MyrtleBeachArtMuseum.org), or by leaving a voicemail at 843/238-2510. We promise we will get back to you as quickly as possible.

Thank you for your support of the Art Museum, which is normally open Tuesday – Saturday, 10am – 4pm and Sunday 1 – 4pm, closed Mondays.

Don’t believe all reports by the media about these storms and don’t just write off whole areas that suffer some sort of damage. After the storm is when they really need your support. No one wants guakers but they also don’t want to be written off for a long period of time. Check with them to see if they’re ready to accept your visit. They’d love you to come see them – they need you to come see them.

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