Archive for the ‘Anderson SC Visual Arts’ Category

Stamie Cline From Anderson, SC, is the 2019 Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail Quilter of the Year

November 5, 2019

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail (UHQT) honored Stamie Cline, from Anderson, SC, as the 2019 Quilter of the Year. The Quilter of the Year award was initiated in 2010 to recognize a quilter who has provided community service and leadership through their quilting. She was present her award on Nov. 2, 2019, at a reception provided by the Prickly Fingers Quilt Guild and the UHQT, held at the Anderson County Library and attended by family and community members.


Stamie Cline

Stamie is small in stature with a voice and passion for life that belies her physical self. She started sewing at the age of 12 making her own clothes and learning to embroider. During the Bicentennial in 1976, she began quilting. As a young adult, maybe 25 – 26 years old, she went to the local library in Dyer, Indiana, and searched through all 141 books of patterns, ideas, and sewing directions. Her plan was to display handmade items – clothing and quilts -in the glass case at the library featuring these books.

Stamie comes from a long and distinguished family of seamstresses. Her Aunt Nell taught her to sew and both grandmothers sewed. Her mother’s Aunt Jeanine made custom suits for men. Stamie still has the Slant-a-Matic Singer machine she learned how to sew on as a girl. Her Aunt Floss also inspired her because she did alterations on wedding gowns. Stamie said, “I can still see her at night in a pool of light bent over her machine.”

While living in Indiana, Stamie joined a group of women and learned to hand quilt. When she was 28, she moved to Simpsonville, SC, and two years later to the Anderson area. Now, as a retiree, she devotes her time to philanthropy sewing efforts. Stamie is the philanthropy coordinator for both of Anderson’s quilt guilds, Electric City and Prickly Fingers.

She also is active in the Production Team of the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail and assists in painting the blocks and teaching others how to master the craft every Friday. She had been teaching a friend, Laura Shiffler to sew – simple blocks and nine patches for PAWS- cats and dogs. Laura says, “Stamie was an introvert when we first met- shy and quiet. Now she is self-confident and when she talks- you know it is her heart coming out.”

Stamie spends much of her time making quilts for children, Quilts of Valor, the Cancer Association and sometimes family or custom orders. After Stamie’s mother passed, she chose to donate the use of that home for teaching quilting, promoting philanthropy efforts, utilizing a midarm quilting machine, and storing the guilds’ library and donated fabrics. Stamie is also part of Quilts of Valor for Veterans and thought, “Wouldn’t it be great to have classes there.” The house, dubbed the Sew Inn, is open to anyone who wants to learn sewing and machine quilting on the 3rd Wednesday of the month.

In 2009, Stamie lost her job at Bosch and recounts, “I believed my dream of the Sew Inn was unattainable. But I remembered what Pastor Berry said and stepped out in faith – and look where we are now!” When asked what encouraged Stamie to be involved in philanthropy sewing she said, “Pastor Berry used to say, ‘Pursue your passion – God gives everyone a gift- find your gift, your passion, and pursue it.’” Stamie continued saying, “When you pursue your passion, you will find your purpose. These children who receive our quilts and other gifts will never know who we are. But as adults, they will remember someone did something for them who didn’t have to – and I hope that makes a difference.”

At one point, Stamie owned her own craft shop and was dedicated in teaching many students and encouraging their creativity. Her work – much of it unique and her own design – has been displayed in several venues, including the Anderson County Museum, the Anderson County Library, and the Anderson Quilt Show.

Across the nation, many quilters see that the art of quilting is enjoying a resurgence. Stamie states it is because “People have a need for self-expression that remains after we are gone – something that says I was here – a legacy of love and time.”

For further info call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC Adds Another Quilt Block to the Trail in Anderson, SC

June 27, 2018

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC adds quilt block #219 Drunken Sailor to the ever expanding Quilt Trail.


Descendants of Ida Bell Nelson Turner, Quilt Maker, Variation of the “Drunken Sailor” Pattern. Created near Shellhorn, AL, around 1910/20.
Left front to rear: Diann Simms (granddaughter) and Nelson Brooks (great-grandson)
Right front to rear: Simms Brooks (great-granddaughter), Holland Simms (grandson), Eden Brooks (great-great-grandaughter) and Walt Brooks (great-grandson)

Experienced quilters will recognize Ida Bell Nelson Turner’s lovely, complex quilt as an example of the Drunkard’s Path pattern. This is one of the more challenging quilt blocks to construct because of its curved piecing and complicated block layout. Turner’s quilt is distinguished by its intricate arrangement of blocks and its balanced placement of color. Its block layout is more complicated than other common arrangements. Its bright early 20th century fabrics make this Drunkard’s Path an especially cheerful quilt.

Turner likely made this quilt sometime after 1920 while living with her husband, Newman Sebastian Turner, in Pike County, AL. She lived in close proximity to her many relatives and friends who joined with her to complete quilts for each other. Turner’s granddaughter Diann Simms—the owner of this quilt and sponsor of this block—says Ida told her she used to “put the pieces together” and then family and friends would gather and quilt. According to Turner, not everyone in the group got a completed quilt each year. They “took turn about.” While Ida’s quilt is admired for its beauty and craftsmanship today, its original purpose was covering beds and keeping warm. Like many quilts of the early 20th century, this quilt is backed with bright yellow fabric. The quilt top has a border of blue and bright yellow.

The Drunkard’s Path’s zig zag pattern of curved pieces resembles the path a drunk might walk after a night of drinking. Some quilt historians note that the Drunkard’s Path pattern was popular among quilters during the nation’s experiment with Prohibition. These historians believe that women who supported the temperance movement may have used this pattern to express their support of the anti-alcohol cause. There is, however, some disagreement among quilt historians about the theory’s validity. Turner’s granddaughter Diann doubts that her grandmother made this quilt as a political statement but thinks she’d have found its name, Drunkard’s Path, funny since Ida abstained from alcohol all her life.

Turner was born in 1880 and died in 1966. She is buried near Shelhorn, AL. This quilt block is located at 66 Oleander Drive, Anderson, SC.

For further information about the Quilt Trail call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail Offers Quilt Block to Honor UHQT Quilter of the Year – #208 Wild Thing

February 27, 2018

In 2016, The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail (UHQT) announced the selection of Anderson city resident, Diane Schonauer, as the UHQT quilter of the year. This program is sponsored by the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail to recognize a resident of either Anderson, Oconee or Pickens County who is a quilter and has provided community service and leadership through their quilting.


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Schonauer, a transplant from Illinois, began quilting over twenty five years ago and has experimented with both fiber quilts and hand painted wooden and aluminum quilt panels.

Philanthropy is a core value of Schonauer’s. Her work with the Anderson quilt Guilds, Quilters of South Carolina, Anderson Quilts of Valor and the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail and other community organizations keeps her very busy most days of the week.

As the quilter of the year the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail sponsors a quilt in honor of the awardee. Schonauer selected one of her quilts “Wild Thing” to be replicated. She opted to donate the hand painted quilt panel to the City of Anderson. The City of Anderson has placed it on the city parking garage, located at the corner of Murray and 130 W. Whitner Streets, this is the perfect location as one of the buildings visitors to Anderson pass on their trip.

For additional information about the City and its attractions visit (http://downtownandersonsc.com/). Also visit (http://www.visitanderson.com/) to explore the many interesting and fun options throughout the county.

For further info about the Quilt Trail call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC Adds Quilt Block #199

May 31, 2017

Driving down Sandy Springs Road in North West Anderson County, SC, through rolling farm land you will find Bruce and Toni Smith’s home. They have sponsored the 199th quilt location on the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC.

The Lone Star quilt block can be viewed on their barn at 1101 Sandy Springs Road. We asked the Smith’s how they selected this quilt for their barn. They said, “We were in the little Amish town of Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania, and went into a store that had quilts for sale. It was here that we were amazed with all the quilts to choose from but Toni couldn’t decide on one that she was really taken with. A young Amish girl suggested that we go out into the country side and find a lady that made quilts at her home and that she really did beautiful work. We did find her the next day and made a very satisfying purchase of this quilt at her home.” Mrs. Smith stated that she has always loved quilts and wanted a quilt for their home. She continues to use the Lone Star quilt to adorn their home and now their barn.

The Smith’s live on a farm that has been in Bruce’s’ family since 1949. His family moved to this farm the year he was born and still possess the wagon his father used to move the family to their new home. They have primarily been cattle farmers and continue to run a few head of cattle. They love the rolling hills and open spaces and have a lovely bed of roses.

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD, Quilt historian states in her article “The Lone Star Quilt Design Through Time” that, ”The Lone Star quilt block is likely one of the most recognizable quilt patterns to Americans. It is also one of the oldest patterns, along with the Mariner’s Compass, Orange Peel, Job’s Trouble and Irish chain. But this is a pattern known by many names. There are variations of it with 6 points, 8 points (the most common design) or even more…”. This old multi-pieced star block is known by many names. The Mathematical Star was an early name used in England and along the Eastern US seaboard, especially near Baltimore.

The Star of Bethlehem is a well-known name for it all around the country and is still used today. Other names for the same pattern are the Star of the East, Morning Star, which is what Native American’s call it, and Lone star, which is the name given to this pattern by Texan quilters because they are called the lone star state…The Amish liked the large central Star pattern, as did the southern states, across the US. The Central States made their fair share, but it seems more were made closer to the last quarter of the 19th century and in to the 20th century’s first two quarters.” Source: New Pathways Into Quilt History.

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).

Anderson Arts Center in Anderson, SC, Calls for Entries for Its “42nd Annual Juried Show” – Deadline Apr. 1, 2017

February 27, 2017

The Anderson Arts Center’s “42nd Annual Juried Show” and Partnership for Public Arts: SculpTOUR will accept entries on Thursday, Mar. 30, 2017, through Saturday, Apr. 1, 2017, from 10am–4pm in Anderson, SC. Over $18,000 in prizes for Best In Show, Second, Third with specials awards in photography, watercolor, fine craft, and purchase awards are available. Awards for outdoor sculpture total $6,000. The announcement of winners will be held at the Awards Ceremony on Friday, Apr. 28. The show will run until May 26, 2017.

Entries for the annual juried show should be delivered to 110 Federal Street in Anderson, SC. Sculpture entries may be entered as photographs with full description by e-mail at (sydneyb@andersonarts.org). A prospectus may be obtained by calling 864/222-2787 or online at (www.andersonarts.org).