Archive for the ‘art Installations’ Category

Where the Trail Will Lead: The 200th Quilt Square on the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail

April 3, 2017

by Victoria Hurst

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail, in Upstate, SC, is celebrating its 200th quilt square at the Greater Pickens Chamber of Commerce on April 7, 2017, at 12:30pm. For eight years, the Quilt Trail has grown, block by block, into a meaningful part of Upstate South Carolina’s landscape for locals who want to preserve the history and traditions of the area. While the Quilt Trail is built, perpetuated, and maintained by locals with a passion for their history, it is also a unique experience for visitors to the area. The Trail appeals to those who enjoy art, nature, history, crafting, story-telling, and even just taking a car ride through the countryside
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As the UHQT has grown over the years, it has forged a path through the lives of so many in its surrounding communities. The members of the Trail are comprised of people who have had the tradition of quilting passed down to them, those whose created the tradition for themselves, and those who are not quilters but still help make the trail possible in various ways. There are now two teams of over 20 volunteers in Anderson and Oconee Counties. This art form has woven its way into the hearts of this community.

Martha File is the one of the founding members of the trail and continues to work with the UHQT from her current home in Athens, OH. Martha was living in Seneca, SC, when she began working with the Quilt Trail and usually comes back to her home in Seneca for a week or two every month. Her favorite square is mounted there, which is based on a quilt made by her aunt. Martha is passionate about organizations that promote community service and fellowship, and “the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail would not be where it is today without all the community support it has received. This is truly a collaborative effort by many organizations, businesses and individuals in Anderson, Oconee and Pickens Counties. Some of our quilts have been painted by students in the schools, community groups, families, as well as by our volunteers.” Martha has been on this journey since 2009 and has watched as quilt squares have been added to homes, historic buildings, destination venues, and businesses in the Upstate.

Nancy Warmath, who lives outside of Seneca, had both a grandmother and mother who quilted, and she has a quilt that her mother made at the age of 12. She also has a quilt square above her mailbox, #139 “Dogwood Quilt,” based on one of her grandmother’s. Nancy is in the process of making a quilt herself for the first time in 30-something years. After getting involved through Gil Huggins on the Walhalla production team, she has worked on painting several of the quilt squares, beginning with #80, “Wedding Ring” in Central. She also did work on the 200th Quilt, which will be unveiled April 7th. She loves the stories behind the quilts and hopes to see wider promotion of the trail, as it brings more visitors to our area and inspires residents to learn more about their heritage.

One resident of Seneca, Lyn Geibens, has a quilt square on her home (quilted by Gil Huggins) and got involved in the quilt trail through her friend, Jane Bolling. Lyn and Jane worked with the students at Keowee Elementary School to paint their quilt square, #10 “Compass Rose”, and recalls how proud the students were to write their names on the back of what they helped create. Lyn also finds it gratifying to work with a group of “strong willed woman…there is very little criticism and loads of encouragement.”

Oconee County Production Team Leader Chris Troy is an artist based in Bountyland, between Seneca and Walhalla. She also has a quilt square on her house, which represents the first and only quilt that she actually created herself. While Chris’s medium of choice is ceramics rather than textiles, she really values being involved in the UHQT and says “the hands on, face to face interaction of people of diverse backgrounds coming together for the purpose of creating public art has always been a positive endeavor.”

Jim and Barbara Schoonover of Wynward Point in Salem are a husband/wife duo that have been involved with the UHQT since 2009. Barbara is a quilter, and she is on the production team for painting the quilt patterns. Jim cuts the board, paints the primer, and draws the patterns. At this time, he holds the title of only man on the team. He and Barbara both enjoy working with an organization that they see as a great asset to the community and a great “way to connect with locals who have grown up here and those who have moved to this area for the beauty of the Upstate.”

Abby Heid is another resident of Seneca, SC, who finds a strong sense of identity and community from being involved in UHQT: “The people who participate in the UHQT have a strong camaraderie…[they] bring together their individual skill sets with each new quilt project. The talents of artists, quilters, crafters, and those who want to learn come together to turn someone’s hand or machine-sewn quilt into a fantastic work of art. The teamwork is amazing. It is the people, who come weekly to the studio and contribute their talents, laughter, and chatter that make you feel welcomed and come back to learn more.”

The members of the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail put in over 7,000 volunteer hours per year, giving presentations, painting quilt squares with members of the community, and finding ways to improve and promote this priceless resource. As these proud members reveal their 200th milestone along a winding, scenic, and sometimes uphill road, they also have announcements about how this project will continue to grow and reach even more people across the region and beyond. Join the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail at the Pickens Chamber of Commerce at 222 W. Main St. in Pickens, SC on April 7th at 12:30pm to see where the trail will lead!

Victoria Hurst is a writer, traveler and Clemson native who is now based in Charleston, SC.

For further information visit (www.uhqt.org).

Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, Celebrates the Opening of Northside Artlets

March 30, 2017

On Apr. 11, 2017 from 5-7pm the Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, along with their partners and the Northside community will celebrate the opening of four Northside Artlets. The celebration will take place on the corner of Brawley and Farley Streets at two of the Artlet locations.

An opening ceremony will begin at 5:15pm with lots of activities and performances to follow. Join us for hands-on arts and crafts like painting, carving, planting and more. Live music and spoken word poetry along with refreshments will be enjoyed by all.

The Northside Artlets are outlets for art, and serve as public spaces for the creation of art. Designed and built to nurture social, cultural, and physical connections to place, embedding art in daily ritual to evoke community memory, tradition, and meaning. Conceived by the Northside Voyagers during the 2014 master planning process led by Art-Force, the Artlets were designed by Spartanburg Artist, Eli Blasko. The Northside Artlets were built by Blasko, four Apprentices receiving NCCER Certification through Spartanburg Community College, and Northside residents. The Northside Artlets provided workforce training, skills, and jobs for apprentices, renewed focus and access for cultural exchange in the Northside neighborhood, and provided direct collaboration with a professional artist.

Jennifer Evins, President and CEO hopes that “by providing a unique place with free daily access to the residents and visitors of the Northside, these Artlets will help to increase the vibrancy of the neighborhood and attract new residents and businesses to this developing community. The arts are known to make neighborhoods livable and express the unique culture of residents.” Northside has a long history of excellence in the visual and performing arts and is home to Spartanburg’s music legend Pink Anderson, Visual Artist and Educator Winston Wingo and many others.

The Artlets were made possible by a design grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support the design, fabrication, and installation. The result is a resident-inspired cultural destination capturing and extending the history and unique identity of the Northside.

While the project is being led by Chapman Cultural Center, critical partners include Artlet Artist Eli Blasko, Project Director Janet Kagan with Art-Force, the Northside Neighborhood Association as well as contributions from:

Northside Development Group
The Northside Voyagers
Spartanburg Community College Corporate + Community Education
Spartanburg Housing Authority Youth Build Program
Leadership Spartanburg Alumni Association Led by Crystal Pace
Stephen M Poole Builders Inc
Northside Neighborhood Association
Eagle Metals Manufacturing
Duke Energy
Milliken
Creative Development LLC
Anonymous Donor
Dellfrio
Inman Mills
Bob Burnett’s Inc
Jethro Waters
Constance Jones
Contributions of time generously donated by residents

Chapman Cultural Center provides cultural leadership for Greater Spartanburg by developing, strengthening, and promoting the scope, excellence and educational role of the arts, humanities and sciences, and to further their significance in the life of our community and all of its citizens.

The Chapman Cultural Center is located in on East Saint John St in downtown Spartanburg, SC. Please visit (www.ChapmanCulturalCenter.org) for more information.

Arts Council of Henderson County in Hendersonville, NC, Announces ArtScape Banners Opening Reception – Apr. 7, 2017

March 30, 2017

The ArtScape Hendersonville Banners committee invites the public to celebrate the ArtScape banners recently installed in downtown Hendersonville, NC, at an art reception in two locations:  Art Mob Studios & Marketplace, 124 4th Avenue East, and at Art On 4th Gallery & Studio at 125 4th Avenue West, in Hendersonville, on Friday, Apr. 7, from 5 -7:30pm. The two galleries are hosting the receptions with the artists, and the sponsors of the banners, in attendance.

The art reception and sale celebrates the first annual ArtScape Hendersonville banners. Artwork selected as a result of a jury process has been reproduced on 40 banners that will hang from lamp posts on Hendersonville’s Main Street, Seventh Avenue, and side streets for a year beginning in March 2017. In providing a unique twist on an outdoor gallery experience, the project’s objective is to create an outdoor gallery experience making Hendersonville an exciting and unique art destination.

The 40 artists will be at the opening reception, and are offering the artwork depicted on the banners for sale to the public. Live music, appetizers, and drinks will be provided at both locations.

Led by Hendersonville artist, Costanza Knight, the ArtScape Hendersonville Banners Committee formed as a result of a collaboration between the Art League of Henderson County, the Arts Council of Henderson County, and Downtown Hendersonville, Inc. ArtScape Banners Hendersonville received funding from the Community Foundation of Henderson County.

The Arts Council of Henderson County is a community organization that promotes, advocates for and nurtures the arts in Henderson County and Western North Carolina. Its office is located at 401 North Main St., Ste. 302, Hendersonville, NC 28792. (Entrance on Fourth Avenue West.)

The Arts Council is supported in part by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources; funds administered by the Community Foundation of Henderson County, Henderson County, Henderson County Tourism Development Authority, and the City of Hendersonville.

For more information please contact the Arts Council by e-mail at (acofhc@bellsouth.net) or call 828/693-8504. The web address is (www.acofhc.org).

Theatre Art Galleries in High Point, NC, Offers Opportunity for Muralists and Public Art – Deadline Apr. 7, 2017

March 18, 2017

Theatre Art Galleries (TAG), in High Point, NC, is seeking artists to design murals for potential sites (exterior walls) in High Point. The designs will be part of an exhibit revolving around public art to be held at TAG, with prize money and potential opportunities for execution of winning mural designs.

Objective: Generate interest in and raise awareness of public art by presenting an exhibit showcasing the design concepts of muralists.


Brian’s Frog Mural

Date of exhibit:  June 1 – August 4, 2017

Concept: Potential sites (walls) will be identified and photographed by TAG.

Selected artists may design for a specific wall (to be assigned by TAG prior to the design work) or may choose to submit a design that will then be superimposed on a wall at TAG’s discretion (after the design is submitted.)

TAG will superimpose designs onto photographs and enlarged on foamcore for exhibit

Interested artists should submit images of previous mural work along with contact information to info@tagart.org.  Full information is listed on the website (www.tagart.org).

Timeframe:

March 17-April 7:  Call to artists

April 11: Selected artists notified

April 12-May 10:  Artists design

May 11:  Art submitted to TAG (deadline)

May 12-24:  Exhibit prepared (photographs enlarged with art superimposed)

May 25:  Exhibit installed

June 1:  Opening Reception

August 3:  Exhibit ends

Prize money:

1st place:  $500

2nd place:  $250

3rd place:  $100

Winners to be determined by impartial committee appointed by TAG.  Artists will retain all rights to their artwork.  Designs are for exhibit only and not for actual execution, although in some cases that could be a possibility.

For more information or questions please contact Jeff Horney, Executive Director, at 336/887-2137.

Inside/Out Brings Art to Area Neighborhoods in Charlotte, NC

February 28, 2017

Imagine encountering Andy Warhol’s “Marilyn” outside a YMCA or emerging artist Jordan Casteel’s “Kevin The Kite Man” in the middle of a park. Charlotteans will be able to participate in this experience beginning in April when the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art and the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture, in Charlotte, NC, launch Inside/Out Charlotte. The Inside/Out Charlotte initiative is a part of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation’s national effort to share collections and bring art into communities.

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This public exhibition and outreach program will reach into the greater Charlotte-Mecklenburg area to strengthen knowledge, understanding and appreciation for visual art. The program places framed, high-quality reproductions of artworks on display at the Bechtler Museum and Gantt Center for community members to encounter and enjoy programming specifically designed for each installation. Inside/Out Charlotte will launch in the spring highlighting artworks that reflect the diversity of the museums’ collections and broad interests in the communities.

The program started eight years ago at the Detroit Institute of Arts and now includes partners around the nation; the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Akron Art Museum, and Perez Art Museum Miami. The Knight Foundation has funded the expansion to additional cities including Charlotte.

“There’s something very powerful about seeing works of art in person. You become completely immersed. Inside/Out brings that experience to people, directly in their communities, and an amazing thing happens: entire neighborhoods, entire communities, start to talk about art,” said Victoria Rogers, vice president for arts at Knight Foundation.

Residents, families and friends in the participating communities will be able to walk through the park or hop on a bike and encounter art in unexpected places and enjoy each exciting outdoor exhibition. The Bechtler and the Gantt Center, in conjunction with the partner communities, will plan educational opportunities and other fun activities, such as bicycle and walking tours, community discussions, musical performances and more.

Inside/Out Charlotte is now in the process of asking city and community representatives, development authorities and arts organizations interested in being part of the museums’ new program. Communities can choose one of two exhibition periods: spring, from April to July, or fall, from September to December. Selected communities will have the opportunity to host five to eight reproductions within walking or bike-riding distance from each other. In all, up to 60 reproduced artworks will be on display around Charlotte in the spring and an additional 80 works in the fall.

Communities and businesses that take part will be promoted through the Inside/Out Charlotte website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and more. The museum installs the reproductions and can assist community leaders in developing educational programs that engage people and inspire them to visit the Bechtler and the Gantt Center. To learn more, visit the Inside/Out Charlotte website at (InsideOutCLT.org).

The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture presents, preserves and celebrates excellence in the art, history and culture of African-Americans and those of African descent. The Center is located at Levine Center for the Arts 551 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28202. Operating hours are Sun., from 1-5pm; Monday: Closed, Tue.-Sat., from 10am-5pm.

The Bechtler Museum of Modern Art is dedicated to the exhibition of mid-20th-century modern art. It is named after the family of Andreas Bechtler who assembled and inherited a collection created by seminal figures of modernism. The museum is located at Levine Center for the Arts, 420 South Tryon Street, Charlotte 28202. Operating hours are Mon., Wed., Thur., Fri, and Sat., 10am-5pm; Sun., noon-5pm; and closed Tue.

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is a national foundation with strong local roots. We invest in journalism, in the arts, and in the success of cities where brothers John S. and James L. Knight once published newspapers. Our goal is to foster informed and engaged communities, which we believe are essential for a healthy democracy.”

For further information contact Sharon Holm, Bechtler Museum of Modern Art Director of Marketing and Communications, by e-mail at (sharon.holm@bechtler.org) or call 704/353-9204.

The Arts Council of Wilmington and New Hanover County in Wilmington, NC, Calls for Submissions for Its Pedestrian Art Project – Deadline is February 28, 2017

February 8, 2017

The Arts Council of Wilmington and New Hanover County in Wilmington, NC, invites sculptors to submit proposals for its Pedestrian Art public sculpture program. Up to 12 works will be installed for one year at various locations in Wilmington, NC, beginning in April 2017.

The deadline for consideration is February 28, 2017.

Click here for more information at (http://artscouncilofwilmington.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/PedArt-2017-Call-for-Entries1.pdf).

The Arts Council is located at 221 N. Front Street, Suite 101, Wilmington, NC 28401

For further information call 910/343-0998, e-mail to (pedart@artswilmington.org) or visit (www.ArtsWilmington.org).

The Public Art Committee of Johnson City, TN, Calls for Sculptures – Deadline Mar. 15, 2017

January 2, 2017

The Public Art Committee of Johnson City, TN, is seeking pieces of leasable outdoor sculpture to be installed for two years in and around Founders Park, downtown Johnson City, TN, from June 2017 – May 2019.

Compensation to the selected artists will be provided by private donations. Each artist will receive a $2,000.00 stipend (per piece) as well as inclusion in a printed brochure, exposure on the city’s website and other related media.

Exhibition dates: June 2017 – May 2019.

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“A Refusal to Stop and Ask for Directions” by Harry McDaniel, Asheville, NC

This sculpture exhibition, primarily located in the new Founders Park, is part of a larger greenway vision plan for the city. The greenway will include areas of pollinator plants and sites for public art, in addition to functional items such as benches, planters, educational kiosks, an outdoor events facility for the local farmers market, etc., and bike racks. The greenway plan is visualized as both symbolic and practical: feeding culture and commerce between the community and university, as well as physically nurturing the environment by providing a habitat that is beneficial to all.

The eighth-largest city in Tennessee, with a population of 63,000, Johnson City was founded in 1856 and later became a major rail hub for the Southeast. Johnson City is distinguished as a community that embraces art, the environment, commerce, science, community, and education. It is home to a broad based economy and to East Tennessee State University.

Johnson City, with an elevation of over 2000 feet, is located in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains.  Farmland, undulating hills, lush valleys, and many lakes and rivers surround it. Johnson City has an abundance of unspoiled natural beauty and four distinct seasons.

The guest curator for this second year’s exhibition will be sculptor Bill Brown. Bill Brown’s career as a full time artist spans over 35 years. His sculpture is included in public and private collections including the Library of Congress and The North Carolina Arboretum in Asheville. His work has been featured in solo, group, and invitational exhibitions, including Auburn University, Duke University School of Law, and SOFA Chicago. He has received numerous awards, conducted many lectures and workshops, and received recognition through various public media and publications. Brown has long-term relationships with regional sculpture organizations, arts museums, and organizations serving as board member, juror, and advisor.
Eligibility: The exhibition is open to all artists, preferably professional sculptors, who are at least 18 years of age and reside in the United States. City of Johnson City employees and members of the Johnson City Public Art Committee are not eligible to apply.

Sculpture: The committee is seeking original art works that may be functional or nonfunctional, temporary or permanent work in any media suitable for outdoor public space. All sculpture must meet the following basic requirements:
1. The work must be structurally sound so as to stand-alone or to be secured to a concrete pad. The project must be of a scale large enough to be clearly visible.
2. The work must be capable of withstanding adverse weather conditions, including hot summers, cold winters, rain, wind, and snow.  Founders Park may occasionally flood; sculptures should be able to withstand brief and occasional periods of water around the base.
3. The work must be suitable for pedestrian interaction with a low exposure to injury. The public must be protected from possible injury from materials and the work must not include moving parts.
4. The work must be original and preferably (not required) may be relatable to features of Johnson City and the greenway vision plan.
5. The work must be available for a period of 2 years, from installation in late May 2017 to removal in early May 2019.

General Information:
Installation: Selected Artists are responsible for transportation of their work to and from the site and are encouraged to be on site to oversee installation. Installation costs regarding site preparation will not be the responsibility of the Artist. In addition, the City will provide adequate staff and any heavy equipment required (i.e. crane or forklift) to assist Artist with installation.

Stipend/Awards: Upon the successful installation of selected sculpture the Artist will receive a $2000.00 stipend for the 24-month lease of the piece. Hotel accommodations for a total of 1 night will be provided by the City of Johnson City, Public Works Department, to accepted artists, either for installation and /or the reception.

Purchases: Negotiation and sale of the sculpture is the responsibility of the Artist, however the Public Art Committee of Johnson City will make every good effort to promote the artists’ work to potential buyers. Artist shall pay the Johnson City Parks & Recreation Foundation a fee of twenty percent (20%) of any sale while on exhibit or within six (6) months thereafter. At the conclusion of the exhibition, the Public Art Committee may recommend one or more works be purchased by the City for inclusion in Johnson City’s permanent collection.

Additional Information:
Artists chosen shall enter into a contract with the City and in that will agree to temporarily loan sculpture to the City and in return the City agrees to temporarily display Artist’s Sculpture.

Artist has full legal title and copyrights to the sculpture while on temporary loan to the City.

Artist shall be responsible for maintaining sculpture. City shall be responsible for maintaining exhibition site.

Artist shall be solely responsible for providing all risk property insurance coverage for the sculpture while on loan and during transportation to and removal from the exhibit site. The Artist shall provide the City of Johnson City with a 1 million dollar liability insurance policy with the City of Johnson City named as the Additional Insured for the duration of the exhibit.

Exhibition Calendar:
* Dates for upload of applications to web site:  Jan 15-Mar 15, 2017
* Notification to selected artists:  April 14, 2017
* Installation of sculptures: May 15-30, 2017
* Founders Park Sculpture Tour with Curator: date to be determined

Johnson City Founders Park Sculpture Application Guidelines:
Artists may submit up to 5 pieces for consideration.

Artists must submit a digital packet at (http://jcpublicart.com/call/)

Cover Letter/Letter of Intent – Letter of intent, not to exceed one page for each sculpture, that includes a description of the sculptures and the media in which the sculptures were fabricated. Label each sculpture description as indicated below.

Resume Tab (All One Document) – Recent CV and brief artists’ statement (150 words max), Image Detail sheet with one thumbnail view of each piece submitted. Label each image with: Entry #, title, medium, date completed, dimensions, and price.

Two images of each submitted piece – Please label images this way: LASTNAME.#.title.jpeg. For each entry use a new number, i.e #1A, #1B for two views of first entry, and so on.

Three Professional References – each of whom can speak to your qualifications, with phone and email contact information.

Entries must be submitted by 5pm on March 15, 2017, and cannot be submitted before January 15.

For questions regarding the sculpture competition, contact Nancy Fischman (Public Art Committee member and chair of the Leased Art Project subcommittee) or e-mail to (nancyfischman@gmail.com).

Point of Contact for General Information only: Phil Pindzola, Director of Public Works, City of Johnson City by e-mail at (ppindzola@johnsoncitytn.org) or call 423/434-6080.

* Founders Park map and site photos are available at (www.johnsoncitytn.org/art).

North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, NC, Installs Two Sculptures by Mark di Suvero in Museum Park

December 23, 2016

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The North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA), in Raleigh, NC, has installed two large-scale steel sculptures by New York–based artist Mark di Suvero in its Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park. The sculptures, 26-foot-tall Ulalu and 32-foot-tall No Fuss, are on long-term loan to the Museum.

“We’re thrilled to install not one but two of Mark di Suvero’s striking, vibrant, and imaginative sculptures at the NCMA,” says Linda Dougherty, the Museum’s chief curator and curator of contemporary art. “These sculptures—appearing to defy gravity with a tremendous sense of dynamism, energy, and movement—will be a perfect addition to the Park, engaging with both the landscape and our visitors.”

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Mark di Suvero, “Ulalu”, 2001, stainless steel, painted steel, 26′ 7″ h x 30′ w x 15′ d, © 2016 Mark di Suvero. Photo courtesy of the North Carolina Museum of Art

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Mark di Suvero, “No Fuss”, 2003-2008, steel, 32 x 50 x 30 ft, © 2016 Mark di Suvero. Photo courtesy of the North Carolina Museum of Art

Internationally renowned for the monumental steel sculptures he has created for over five decades, Di Suvero employs the industrial tools of cutting and welding torches and cranes to create massive, architectural works out of steel I-beams. The improbable angles and sharp lines of his constructions, like giant 3-D drawings, activate the landscapes they are placed in with enormous, forceful, sweeping gestures.  Playing with balance and suspension, some works, like No Fuss, have movable parts that swing and rotate.

“The enormous, bold sculptures will energize the Museum Park in a whole new way—drawing visitors into the new gardens and rolling meadow, welcoming passersby from the street front, and adding a new element of color and geometric line that will contrast beautifully with the natural landscape,” says Dan Gottlieb, the NCMA’s director of planning, design, and the Museum Park. “Placing Ulala at Blue Ridge Road and No Fuss in the meadow will help unify the campus and visually signify to visitors that they are at the NCMA.”

The dynamic geometry, powerful size, and expansive scale of his work are the result of his creative process. “I don’t build small models or draw detailed plans first,” says Mark di Suvero. “I start with a vision, a dream of what I want to do, and see where it goes.”

Di Suvero lives and works in New York, NY.

The two installations are made possible by the NCMA’s Art in the Environment Fund, which was established to support temporary, permanent, and loaned installations of public art in the NCMA Park and community. It is dedicated to the investment in significant and engaging public art and to providing accessible and meaningful experiences with art and nature for the people of North Carolina.

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years, from ancient Egypt to the present, making the institution one of the premier art museums in the South. The Museum’s collection provides educational, aesthetic, intellectual, and cultural experiences for the citizens of North Carolina and beyond. The 164-acre Museum Park showcases the connection between art and nature through site-specific works of environmental art. The Museum offers changing national touring exhibitions, classes, lectures, family activities, films, and concerts.

The Museum opened West Building, home to the permanent collection, in 2010. The North Carolina Museum of Art, Lawrence J. Wheeler, director, is located at 2110 Blue Ridge Road in Raleigh. It is the art museum of the State of North Carolina, Pat McCrory, governor, and an agency of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, Susan Kluttz, secretary.

Spartanburg, SC, Unveils Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light – Oct. 4, 2016

September 30, 2016

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Award-winning light and digital media artist Erwin Redl will unveil nine public art installations in Spartanburg, SC, on Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016, as a part of Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge. For more than a year, Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light has been building relationships between police officers and communities through a collaborative art-making process.

The installations will be illuminated in conjunction with National Night Out events across 10 city neighborhoods, starting with a celebration at 4:30pm at Mobile Suspension downtown in Denny’s Plaza, 203 E. Main Street, Spartanburg, SC. Composed of five curtains of semi-transparent acrylic panes – nearly 7,000 in total – Mobile Suspension is the result of Redl’s creative design and the collective efforts of residents and police officers who volunteered to assemble the large-scale installation. During the day, sunlight will shine through the mobile, casting colors onto the ground like stained glass. At night, LED lights provided by Hubbell Lighting Inc. in Greenville, SC, will illuminate the mobile from below.

The Oct. 4 event will feature music, food and comments from Spartanburg Mayor Junie White; Jennifer Evins, CEO of the Chapman Cultural Center; Spartanburg Police Chief Alonzo Thompson and neighborhood residents, who will talk about the year-long effort to revitalize the city through art. The illumination of each installation will coincide with a neighborhood celebration at the site, ending with a grand finale at 8:30pm at Glow at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, 350 Howard St., Spartanburg. See below for a schedule of the Oct. 4 celebration.

“By bringing site-specific art into Spartanburg neighborhoods where residents may feel isolated from traditional cultural assets, this project is already fostering greater understanding of both the artistic process and the transformative impact of public art,” said Jennifer Evins, president and CEO of the Chapman Cultural Center. “We are eliminating barriers as residents become part of the artistic process and help translate ideas into works of art.”

In 2015, the City of Spartanburg was selected as one of four communities to participate in the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge, a new program to support temporary public art projects that celebrate creativity, enhance urban identity, encourage public-private partnerships, and drive economic development. The temporary art project, funded by $1 million from Bloomberg Philanthropies, with supplemental funding provided by regional institutions, corporations, foundations and private donors, is a partnership among Redl, the Chapman Cultural Center, the City of Spartanburg and civic leadership.

Redl, whose art installations have illuminated spaces worldwide, has been working with neighborhood residents and community leaders for more than a year to bring the project to life. The artist said each installation is tailored to its environment and that the scale, medium and design vary significantly, ranging from workshop-based video and smaller light installations to large-scale illuminations of two smokestacks.

“Different structures lead to different aesthetic explorations and community engagement possibilities,” Redl said. “Alternative structures lead to alternative results. Change is inevitable, and, through this process, we begin to see Spartanburg in a new light.”

Mayor White said the efforts of Redl and all of those across the community to bring Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light to life are already bearing fruit.

“The night of Oct. 4 is going to be a great night in the history of our community,” said Spartanburg Mayor Junie White. “Something special is happening in Spartanburg right now. Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light is symbolic of what is happening here, and I can’t wait to see the lights come on for everyone.”

Below is a description of the installations and the schedule of the Oct. 4 events:

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Mobile Suspension, Downtown Spartanburg, Denny’s Plaza, 203 E. Main St. – Lights On – 4:30-6pm, Oct. 4.

Five multicolored mobile curtains float above the center lawn of Denny’s Plaza, located in the heart of Spartanburg’s Downtown Cultural District. Each curtain is 51 feet long and 12 feet high and consists of a woven pattern of translucent acrylic 4-inch by 4-inch squares. The installation was designed to create a dazzling visual experience that changes depending on the time of day, the viewer’s position, and weather conditions. The five shimmering curtains are made of multicolored acrylic squares installed in specific patterns designed by the artist. Community volunteers assembled the curtains over a one-month period using specially designed clips. The rectangular shape of the site gave Redl an opportunity to play with subtle variations within a grid. The artist is interested in creating unique visceral sensations for viewers, and Mobile Suspension offers a kaleidoscopic experience that is fresh with each new encounter.

River Poetry, Andrews Farm and Converse Heights, Cottonwood Trail, 1038 Woodburn Road – Lights On – 5:45pm.

Here, artist Erwin Redl provides an opportunity for visitors to contemplate the role of technology in our lives within a nature preserve. Located between Converse Heights and Andrews Farm neighborhoods, the Cottonwood Trail is a 116-acre urban greenspace with 4 1/2 miles of trails, and is owned and maintained by the Spartanburg Area Conservancy, a membership-based nonprofit organization. By juxtaposing LED displays similar to those used by restaurants and gas stations against the solitude of a meandering creek, the artist creates a tangible demonstration that nature and digital technology can coexist. The project presents local poetry displayed on twelve double-sided LED signs suspended above the Cottonwood Trail. Visitors can read the lines of poetry overhead as they walk along Lawson’s Fork Creek. The layered poetry dimension allows for the community to provide their thoughts, observations, and feelings about nature within this dynamic human/nature system created by the artist. The Hub City Writers Project will curate an ongoing series of poems for River Poetry through March 2017.

Under One Roof, South Converse, Picnic Shelter, 440 S. Converse St. – Lights On – 6:10pm.

This park has special meaning to South Converse residents as a sign of local pride and a link to the past. The local neighborhood association fought hard to get this park funded and completed. Touched by the story of the park’s origin, and inspired by the evident pride in the place, Redl decided to use this picnic shelter to demonstrate the transformative power of turning something ordinary into something extraordinary. Residents have attended workshops to learn how to install and program the LED lighting for the shelter. Redl hopes local residents will want to create special light programs for dances, poetry slams, cookouts, or other events in and around the shelter. By using a simple picnic shelter as the basic structure within which many things can happen, and by involving the local community, Redl has tangibly illustrated that we are all indeed together under one roof.

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Islands of Light, Maxwell Hills, Duncan Park Lake, 293 West Park Drive – Lights On – 6:30pm.

Redl explores the fertile intersection of art, nature and technology with this installation of eight floating islands recalling the image of cattails or reeds swaying with the breeze in an aquatic environment. The scale of the site was particularly interesting to the artist, as it allowed for interactions among water, wind, and sky in addition to light and reflection. The logistical challenges of the project were first taken on by students from Daniel Morgan Technology Center. After meeting with the artist and an engineer, these young technicians created a working prototype, which became the blueprint for the finished islands. A local dock builder was engaged to install these light-topped atolls. The local waterfowl have officially adopted these islands of light.

Benchmark Spartanburg, Forest Park, CC Woodson Recreation Center, 210 Bomar Avenue – Lights On – 6:55pm.

Benches are for sitting, yes, but they can also be a site for romance, business deals, creative pastimes or great conversations. Redl has created a chromatically pulsating bench that he hopes will invite community gatherings, poetry readings and other events that make use of the mesmerizing patterns and shifting color palette. The multiple RGB LED side-lit acrylic panels that make up the bench create an almost cinematic experience, saturating the surrounding environment with gradually morphing gradations of color.

Spartanburg Swing, Hampton Heights, National Beta Headquarters, 267 S. Spring St. – Lights On – 7:15pm.

Twenty-six four-foot-long pendulums are evenly distributed across the glass facade of the National Beta Headquarters building. Their slow one-second pulse animates the surface of the concrete and glass structure. Mixing the simple physics of a pendulum with the off-the-shelf electronics of a small fan and flashlight LED, Spartanburg Swing creates a complex choreography. This kinetic work is controlled by small microprocessors that turn the fans and the lights on and off in intervals programmed by the artist. The pulsing movement is created entirely by intermittent fan bursts and the constant tug of gravity.

The site is the international headquarters of National Beta, whose purpose is “to promote the ideals of academic achievement, character, leadership, and service among elementary and secondary school students.” Headquartered in Spartanburg, the organization has more than 8,750 clubs nationally and internationally. The Hampton Heights neighborhood, comprised of homes built between the 1880s and the 1920s, is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Video Village, Highland Neighborhood, Cammie Clagget Apartments, 317 Highland Avenue – Lights On – 7:35pm.

The artist decided he wanted to turn these empty buildings in the Cammie Clagget apartment complex inside out, transforming the now-vacant units into lanterns that face outward to tell their stories and cast their light into the surrounding community. The artist is interested in reanimating these empty spaces as a way to draw our attention to the question of impermanence and what might be possible for the future. Playing with the dual meaning of the word projection, Redl created a 52-channel video screen and directed White Elephant Enterprises and the Spartanburg Art Museum to curate the content for the installation. The selected videos feature a variety of topics but focus on stories of and about the residents of this historic neighborhood. The curators established a media production studio within the nearby Bethlehem Center to facilitate interviews with residents and to collect vintage home-movie footage and digitize family photographs from the community. The artist hopes to jump-start enthusiasm within the community for making videos of all kinds and sharing them in the public square.

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Glow, Beaumont Village and Northside, Beaumont smokestack, 400 Beaumont Avenue – Lights On – 8:05pm.

Northside smokestack, 350 Howard St. – Lights On and grand finale celebration – 8:30pm.

Both of the mill properties owned by Spartan Mills today serve new purposes, one as the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine and the other as the administrative offices of Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System. Originally constructed by master builder Thomas Badgett, these two colossal smokestack structures were built in the late nineteenth century out of locally made brick. Edifices such as these, in the heart of mill villages, have historical relevance and serve as symbols of adaptation and change.

Redl has chosen to treat the smokestacks as two synchronized, large-scale canvases for high-powered multicolored lights that bathe the surface of the worn bricks. For the artist, these artworks offer a new way of seeing old structures.

Born in Austria in 1963, Erwin Redl finished his studies at the Vienna Music Academy with two degrees, a BA in Composition (1990) and BA in Electronic Music (1991). He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship for graduate studies in computer art at the School of Visual Arts, in New York City (MFA 1995). Redl investigates the process of “reverse engineering” by (re-)translating the abstract aesthetic language of virtual reality and 3D computer modeling into architectural environments by means of large-scale light installations.

For the 2002 Whitney Biennial, the artist covered the Whitney Museum’s facade with three multicolor LED veils. In 2008 he created a sound and light installation in the Austrian Pavilion at the World Expo in Zaragoza, Spain. The Pacific Design Center’s new Red Building by Cesar Pelli features four permanent installations by the artist, completed in 2013. Redl’s largest work to date is a computer-controlled, 580-foot-long-LED-installation at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, completed in 2010.

Redl’s work is owned by prestigious national and international institutions, among them the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; the Milwaukee Art Museum; and Borusan Contemporary, Istanbul; as well as by private collectors.

The mission of the Chapman Cultural Center is to provide cultural leadership for Greater Spartanburg by developing, strengthening, and promoting the scope, excellence and educational role of the arts, humanities, and sciences, and to further their significance in the life of our community and all of its citizens. Founded in 1968 with a current budget of $2.1 million, the Chapman Cultural Center is the oldest and largest countywide arts agency in the state of South Carolina and is serving as the lead Arts Agency and Project Manager for Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light.

The City of Spartanburg was selected in 2015 as one of four temporary public art projects from across the United States to receive a grant award from the first-ever Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge. Other winning cities are Gary, IN, Spartanburg, SC, and Los Angeles, CA.  Full information on all projects can be found at publicartchallenge.bloomberg.org.

Bloomberg Philanthropies works in more than 120 countries around the world to ensure better, longer lives for the greatest number of people. The organization focuses on five key areas for creating lasting change: Arts, Education, Environment, Government Innovation and Public Health. Bloomberg Philanthropies encompasses all of Michael R. Bloomberg’s charitable activities, including his foundation and his personal giving. In 2015, Bloomberg Philanthropies distributed over half a billion dollars.

For more information, please visit (bloomberg.org) or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter @BloombergDotOrg.

Metropolitan Arts Council in Greenville, SC, Matches Art with Recycling Programs

August 22, 2016

The seventh annual Flat Out Under Pressure (FOUP), Metropolitan Arts Council’s (MAC) unique program involving the visual arts and sound environmental practices in downtown Greenville, SC, was held on June 3-4, 2016. With eight bins for paper, plastic and glass in various locations along Main Street, FOUP encourages recycling among pedestrians while creating a different exhibiting opportunity for visual artists.

The event begins with a 24-hour art-making juried competition.The selected winners are then given the opportunity to choose two images of their work for reproduction on the bins.The winning artists also receive cash prizes, and the 1st place winner gets a week-long trip to Italy to stay in the beautiful Villa Sant’ Andrea. On Friday, June 3rd, 71 artists came to MAC to get their surfaces officially stamped. 68 of the same surfaces were then returned to MAC within 24 hours as works of art. The works were then juried that afternoon with an awards reception held the evening of June 4. All submitted works are displayed in the MAC Gallery until July 8th, 2016.

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Bin with artwork by Paul Flint

The Bins will be displayed through December 2016.

For further info visit (http://www.greenvillearts.com/mac-programs/flat-out-under-pressure/)