Archive for the ‘art Installations’ Category

City of North Charleston (SC) Cultural Arts Department is Calling for Entries for 13th Annual “National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition” – Deadline is Feb. 25, 2018

December 9, 2017

Sculpture artists from across the nation are invited to participate in the thirteenth annual “National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition”, which opens in conjunction with the 2018 North Charleston Arts Fest. Up to 14 sculptures will be juried into the exhibit and compete for cash prizes totaling up to $19,750. A $1250 honorarium is given to all artists accepted into the show to assist with transportation, installation, de-installation, and incidental expenses. Once all pieces are installed, the juror will award Best in Show ($1000), Outstanding Merit ($500), and up to three Honorable Mentions ($250 each).


“Lightning Over the Mississippi” by Ed Walker (2017/18 Best of Show).

The application is only available online and may be accessed via the link at (NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com/apply). An application fee of $35 allows artists to submit up to four entries. Deadline for submissions is Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018. Artists in need of assistance with any part of the application process may contact the Cultural Arts Department to schedule a one-on-one meeting, which can be conducted over the phone or in person.

Organized and presented by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department, this 11 month exhibition offers established and emerging artists the opportunity to display their thought provoking, extraordinary sculptures throughout the picturesque North Charleston Riverfront Park. Set on the banks of the Cooper River, Riverfront Park features ten acres of walking paths, a boardwalk and fountain, an expansive lawn with performance pavilion, children’s play areas, and picnic sites. An estimated 50,000 people visit this public park annually to enjoy the amenities located in the heart of the city’s arts community.

The juror for this year’s exhibition is Lilly Wei, a New York-based independent curator, writer, journalist, lecturer, and critic. Wei has written for dozens of publications here and abroad and is a longtime contributor to Art in America and a contributing editor at “ARTnews”. She is the author of numerous artists’ catalogues and monographs and has curated exhibitions in the US, Europe, and Asia. Wei lectures frequently on critical and curatorial practices and sits on the board of several non-profit art institutions and organizations including AICA/USA, Bowery Arts & Sciences, and Art Omi International. She was a former board member of Art in General, and is a fellow of the CUE Foundation. Wei was born in Chengdu, China and has an MA in art history from Columbia University, New York.

The 13th Annual “National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition” will be on display May 1, 2018, through March 24, 2019, at North Charleston Riverfront Park, located at 1001 Everglades Avenue in North Charleston, SC. A free public reception and announcement of awards will be held at the Charleston Area Convention Center on Wednesday, May 2, 2018, from 6-8pm.

For more information about the North Charleston Arts Fest, the “National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition”, or other exhibition opportunities, contact the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department at 843/740-5854, e-mail (culturalarts@northcharleston.org), or visit (NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com).

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Caldwell Arts Council Offers New Sculptures in Downtown Lenoir, NC

September 30, 2017

Have you noticed the new sculptures in the planters in downtown Lenoir?

New sculptures have been installed by Ray Giddens of Simpsonville, SC, Jim Weitzel of Forest City, NC, and Sam Steffey of Hudson, NC – with more new sculptures expected soon from Gwendolyn “Gwendy” Kerney of Lenoir City, TN, and from Desmond Lewis of Memphis, TN.


Work by Gwendolyn “Gwendy” Kerney of Lenoir City, TN

This outdoor sculpture gallery, called Tucker’s Gallery, was started by two local sculptors: Keith Willis and Suzette Bradshaw. The concept was to have an outdoor gallery for sculpture along the streets of Lenoir. They partnered with the City of Lenoir who installed planters in downtown Lenoir. Several of those planters have bases in them that allow for the rotation of sculpture.

Tucker’s Gallery gets its name from Lenoir’s history books – the Tucker family settled in the area around 1797 and their barn was likely located on what is now Norwood Street, not far from the Caldwell Arts Council. Tucker’s Barn was a voting precinct, a muster ground, a store and a place for “frolics” and celebrations. At least one large Fourth of July celebration included a drum corps, a march of Revolutionary veterans and speeches by General William Lenoir. Tucker’s Barn became a large meeting place for many gatherings and was so popular a fiddle tune was composed and written titled “Tucker’s Barn.” Doc Watson eventually recorded this tune in 1964 on an album titled, “The Watson Family Tradition.”


Work by Sam Steffey of Hudson, NC

Artwork in Tucker’s Gallery is on display for at least one year and is available for purchase. The gallery is now managed by the Caldwell Arts Council; 828/754-2486; (www.caldwellarts.com).

Stakeholders Announce Plans for “Southern Lights,” a Signature Art Installation for Columbia, SC

June 29, 2017

Southern Lights, a signature, long-term art installation by artist Chris Robinson, will span the Congaree River between the Blossom Street and Gervais Street bridges in Columbia, SC. Scheduled to light up every evening in Cayce, West Columbia and Columbia for the next decade, this installation is coming to fruition through supporters including, What’s Next Midlands, the Congaree Vista Guild, the South Carolina State Museum, EdVenture, the City of Columbia and One Columbia for Arts and History. The laser installation will launch on Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017, as part of the Total Solar Eclipse Weekend celebrations.

With the support of the cities of Columbia, West Columbia and Cayce and Richland County, the installation’s design is meant to connect our cities and the Midlands community. The project offers an innovative approach to public art and celebrates and highlights public infrastructure uniquely. Southern Lights will be the only installation of its kind in the United States, and celebrates the work of Charles Townes, a native South Carolinian whose theories led to the development of laser technology.

“Southern Lights is a product of What’s Next Midlands and an example of our community coming together to move our region forward,” said Meghan Hickman, executive director of EngenuitySC. “This will be a signature piece for our community and a must-see for tourists, and we’re proud to be formally introducing Southern Lights as part of the Total Solar Eclipse Weekend.”

Along with leadership and support from the communities who touch the bridges, leaders in the Midlands business community, including Blue Cross Blue Shield, are sponsoring the project, which will cost an estimated total of $120,000, a value for a signature art piece that will be part of the fabric of our region for a decade.

Chris Robinson, a professor in the School of Visual Art and Design at the University of South Carolina, concentrates on contemporary science and technology and its role in decision-making through installations and digital drawings. He holds a BFA from Florida State and an MFA from the University of Massachusetts and is the recipient of many awards including the Leonardo da Vinci Space Art Award and the Palmetto Pillar Award, along with many competitive art awards. He has lectured, written and exhibited extensively throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia.

Robinson has completed dozens of large-scale installations in his career, most notably installations on the National Mall in Washington, DC, (in conjunction with Rockne Krebs), and in Columbia his light installation at the celebration of the opening of the South Carolina State Museum in 1989 and for the Governor’s Carol Lighting at the South Carolina State House in 1992.

“My installations create a sculptural structure, draw attention to interesting aspects of the surrounding environment and illuminate the distinctive quality of laser light,” said Robinson. “The Congaree River is special and unusual in that it is relatively dark in the middle of an urban environment and the beams can go both under and over the bridges and the viewers.”

Southern Lights is representative of Robinson’s body of work and marks the end of Robinson’s academic career in the School of Visual Art & Design at the University of South Carolina (May 31, 2017). Robinson will become chair of the Department of Art at USC Beaufort this fall.

Robinson will have Southern Lights completely installed by August 2017 but will test the lasers along the way. Two lasers are installed at points on the banks of the Congaree River. One laser is at the City pump station below Founders Park, the USC baseball stadium, and the other is at EdVenture. Additionally, a series of mirrors that will reflect the lasers will be placed on existing structures, including on the rooftop of Bridgepointe Condominiums in West Columbia. The lasers are blue and green in color and mirrors along the river and on the bridges will reflect the lasers. Viewers who take in the installation can expect Southern Lights to look different from different vantage points.

Southern Lights will formally kick off at an event on Saturday, August 19 in the evening in celebration of the Total Solar Eclipse Weekend. The tie-in with the eclipse means that our region’s new signature art piece will be celebrated by locals and tourists alike. Stay tuned to (SouthernLightsSC.com) for event details.

This installation is slated to light up the night for three hours every evening for the next 10 years, (times will change depending on what time the sun sets) or as long as the equipment holds up. The City of Columbia is committed to the ongoing maintenance and management of Southern Lights, as is the South Carolina State Museum. Those who cross the Gervais and Blossom Street bridges or visit the riverfront regularly will be able to take in Southern Lights, and with signage and wayfinding surrounding Southern Lights to come, visitors to the region will discover this major attraction for years to come.

For more information on Southern Lights, visit (SouthernLightsSC.com) and on social media via #SouthernLightsSC.

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Adds Three New Quilt Blocks

April 27, 2017

# 196 “The Together Tree” and #197 “Star of Leadership”

The first two quilts displayed on Pickens County schools can be found at West End Elementary School on Pelzer Highway, just south of Route 123 as you enter Easley, SC, from the west. They are funded by the school and are the brainchildren of the principal, Angie Rodgers. Resident art teacher, Christina Covington’s 4th grade art students participated in the painting of both “Star of Leadership” and “The Together Tree.” The students also submitted names for the two squares, which were then selected by vote. Covington also was involved in painting, taking time off from her Christmas holiday to come to the Walhalla, SC, studio to paint the geometric details of the background in the “Star of Leadership” quilt square.

“The Together Tree” is based originally on an art project designed by a former art teacher, Erin Murphy, at the school. This framed painting hangs in the front entrance of the school and is decorated with the fingerprints of students and teachers at West End. “The fingerprints symbolize that we are all part of something bigger and how we all work together in our own unique and special ways,” states Covington.

The original quilts were also the inspiration of West End’s current principal, Angie Rodgers, who asked a group of quilters, mostly made up of retired West End teachers, to design and sew two hanging quilt squares for the school to display on the walls. Members of this quilting circle meet weekly to sew and also take sewing trips together. The group started approximately eight years ago and includes; Gail King, Janet Hadaway, Kathy Peot, Beth Holcombe and Paula Grant. King and Hadaway were former 4th grade teachers and Holcombe taught 5th grade. Peot is a retired nurse, but is also the mom of former West End students! Grant, a retired 5th grade Science teacher and the youngest of the quilters has recently retired from West End and can now participate fully in the fun.

“The Together Tree”, designed by Janet Hadaway, depicts a tree, surrounded by an appliqued window frame and decorated with actual buttons on a raindrop printed background. This quilt celebrates the diversity of West End as well as the many students who have come and gone through the school.

The “Star of Leadership”, also created as a quilted wall hanging was designed by Beth Holcombe. This block is a variation of the traditional “Star of the Alamo” block pattern. It was inspired by the bright, primary colored blocks in the tiled floors of the hallways of the school, especially where the halls meet at an intersection. This pattern was chosen for its likeness to a compass, directing students to move forward to reach their goals.

The two quilt squares are mounted in front of the school, on a brick marquee, formerly used for school signage and the fabric quilts will be displayed in the school building.

Quilt block #198 has been added to the array of quilts in Anderson, SC

Reagan Smith of 26 Oleander Drive selected a “LeMoyne Star” for placement on her backyard fence. Lystra Seymour from Anderson, SC, made the fabric quilt Smith told us:

“Mrs. Seymour husband is a physician that I call on and he proudly displays his wife’s quilts in his office waiting room as well as his patient rooms….this particular quilt happened to be in his back patient room several years ago when it truly caught my eye… knew that with its simplistic design and bold colors that this was the quilt block design I wanted!”

“This eight point star has many names ‘LeMoyne Star’, ‘Puritan Star’ and ‘Lemon Star’ to name a few. There are several theories on who created this pattern. One theory is that the LeMoyne brothers Pierre and Jean Baptist who founded New Orleans had this particular star pattern prominent in Jean Baptiste’s coat of arms. The earliest published date of the ‘LeMoyne Star’ is in a collection of patterns attributed to Joseph Doyle in 1911, according to Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of ‘Pieced Quilt Patterns’. The configuration falls into the category of ‘Eight-pointed/45 degree Diamond Stars’. Doyle called this pattern ‘Puritan Star’ as the design traveled throughout the country the name became corrupted into ‘Lemon Star’.”

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).

Where the Trail Will Lead: The 200th Quilt Square on the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail

April 3, 2017

by Victoria Hurst

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail, in Upstate, SC, is celebrating its 200th quilt square at the Greater Pickens Chamber of Commerce on April 7, 2017, at 12:30pm. For eight years, the Quilt Trail has grown, block by block, into a meaningful part of Upstate South Carolina’s landscape for locals who want to preserve the history and traditions of the area. While the Quilt Trail is built, perpetuated, and maintained by locals with a passion for their history, it is also a unique experience for visitors to the area. The Trail appeals to those who enjoy art, nature, history, crafting, story-telling, and even just taking a car ride through the countryside
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As the UHQT has grown over the years, it has forged a path through the lives of so many in its surrounding communities. The members of the Trail are comprised of people who have had the tradition of quilting passed down to them, those whose created the tradition for themselves, and those who are not quilters but still help make the trail possible in various ways. There are now two teams of over 20 volunteers in Anderson and Oconee Counties. This art form has woven its way into the hearts of this community.

Martha File is the one of the founding members of the trail and continues to work with the UHQT from her current home in Athens, OH. Martha was living in Seneca, SC, when she began working with the Quilt Trail and usually comes back to her home in Seneca for a week or two every month. Her favorite square is mounted there, which is based on a quilt made by her aunt. Martha is passionate about organizations that promote community service and fellowship, and “the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail would not be where it is today without all the community support it has received. This is truly a collaborative effort by many organizations, businesses and individuals in Anderson, Oconee and Pickens Counties. Some of our quilts have been painted by students in the schools, community groups, families, as well as by our volunteers.” Martha has been on this journey since 2009 and has watched as quilt squares have been added to homes, historic buildings, destination venues, and businesses in the Upstate.

Nancy Warmath, who lives outside of Seneca, had both a grandmother and mother who quilted, and she has a quilt that her mother made at the age of 12. She also has a quilt square above her mailbox, #139 “Dogwood Quilt,” based on one of her grandmother’s. Nancy is in the process of making a quilt herself for the first time in 30-something years. After getting involved through Gil Huggins on the Walhalla production team, she has worked on painting several of the quilt squares, beginning with #80, “Wedding Ring” in Central. She also did work on the 200th Quilt, which will be unveiled April 7th. She loves the stories behind the quilts and hopes to see wider promotion of the trail, as it brings more visitors to our area and inspires residents to learn more about their heritage.

One resident of Seneca, Lyn Geibens, has a quilt square on her home (quilted by Gil Huggins) and got involved in the quilt trail through her friend, Jane Bolling. Lyn and Jane worked with the students at Keowee Elementary School to paint their quilt square, #10 “Compass Rose”, and recalls how proud the students were to write their names on the back of what they helped create. Lyn also finds it gratifying to work with a group of “strong willed woman…there is very little criticism and loads of encouragement.”

Oconee County Production Team Leader Chris Troy is an artist based in Bountyland, between Seneca and Walhalla. She also has a quilt square on her house, which represents the first and only quilt that she actually created herself. While Chris’s medium of choice is ceramics rather than textiles, she really values being involved in the UHQT and says “the hands on, face to face interaction of people of diverse backgrounds coming together for the purpose of creating public art has always been a positive endeavor.”

Jim and Barbara Schoonover of Wynward Point in Salem are a husband/wife duo that have been involved with the UHQT since 2009. Barbara is a quilter, and she is on the production team for painting the quilt patterns. Jim cuts the board, paints the primer, and draws the patterns. At this time, he holds the title of only man on the team. He and Barbara both enjoy working with an organization that they see as a great asset to the community and a great “way to connect with locals who have grown up here and those who have moved to this area for the beauty of the Upstate.”

Abby Heid is another resident of Seneca, SC, who finds a strong sense of identity and community from being involved in UHQT: “The people who participate in the UHQT have a strong camaraderie…[they] bring together their individual skill sets with each new quilt project. The talents of artists, quilters, crafters, and those who want to learn come together to turn someone’s hand or machine-sewn quilt into a fantastic work of art. The teamwork is amazing. It is the people, who come weekly to the studio and contribute their talents, laughter, and chatter that make you feel welcomed and come back to learn more.”

The members of the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail put in over 7,000 volunteer hours per year, giving presentations, painting quilt squares with members of the community, and finding ways to improve and promote this priceless resource. As these proud members reveal their 200th milestone along a winding, scenic, and sometimes uphill road, they also have announcements about how this project will continue to grow and reach even more people across the region and beyond. Join the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail at the Pickens Chamber of Commerce at 222 W. Main St. in Pickens, SC on April 7th at 12:30pm to see where the trail will lead!

Victoria Hurst is a writer, traveler and Clemson native who is now based in Charleston, SC.

For further information visit (www.uhqt.org).

Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, Celebrates the Opening of Northside Artlets

March 30, 2017

On Apr. 11, 2017 from 5-7pm the Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, along with their partners and the Northside community will celebrate the opening of four Northside Artlets. The celebration will take place on the corner of Brawley and Farley Streets at two of the Artlet locations.

An opening ceremony will begin at 5:15pm with lots of activities and performances to follow. Join us for hands-on arts and crafts like painting, carving, planting and more. Live music and spoken word poetry along with refreshments will be enjoyed by all.

The Northside Artlets are outlets for art, and serve as public spaces for the creation of art. Designed and built to nurture social, cultural, and physical connections to place, embedding art in daily ritual to evoke community memory, tradition, and meaning. Conceived by the Northside Voyagers during the 2014 master planning process led by Art-Force, the Artlets were designed by Spartanburg Artist, Eli Blasko. The Northside Artlets were built by Blasko, four Apprentices receiving NCCER Certification through Spartanburg Community College, and Northside residents. The Northside Artlets provided workforce training, skills, and jobs for apprentices, renewed focus and access for cultural exchange in the Northside neighborhood, and provided direct collaboration with a professional artist.

Jennifer Evins, President and CEO hopes that “by providing a unique place with free daily access to the residents and visitors of the Northside, these Artlets will help to increase the vibrancy of the neighborhood and attract new residents and businesses to this developing community. The arts are known to make neighborhoods livable and express the unique culture of residents.” Northside has a long history of excellence in the visual and performing arts and is home to Spartanburg’s music legend Pink Anderson, Visual Artist and Educator Winston Wingo and many others.

The Artlets were made possible by a design grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support the design, fabrication, and installation. The result is a resident-inspired cultural destination capturing and extending the history and unique identity of the Northside.

While the project is being led by Chapman Cultural Center, critical partners include Artlet Artist Eli Blasko, Project Director Janet Kagan with Art-Force, the Northside Neighborhood Association as well as contributions from:

Northside Development Group
The Northside Voyagers
Spartanburg Community College Corporate + Community Education
Spartanburg Housing Authority Youth Build Program
Leadership Spartanburg Alumni Association Led by Crystal Pace
Stephen M Poole Builders Inc
Northside Neighborhood Association
Eagle Metals Manufacturing
Duke Energy
Milliken
Creative Development LLC
Anonymous Donor
Dellfrio
Inman Mills
Bob Burnett’s Inc
Jethro Waters
Constance Jones
Contributions of time generously donated by residents

Chapman Cultural Center provides cultural leadership for Greater Spartanburg by developing, strengthening, and promoting the scope, excellence and educational role of the arts, humanities and sciences, and to further their significance in the life of our community and all of its citizens.

The Chapman Cultural Center is located in on East Saint John St in downtown Spartanburg, SC. Please visit (www.ChapmanCulturalCenter.org) for more information.

Arts Council of Henderson County in Hendersonville, NC, Announces ArtScape Banners Opening Reception – Apr. 7, 2017

March 30, 2017

The ArtScape Hendersonville Banners committee invites the public to celebrate the ArtScape banners recently installed in downtown Hendersonville, NC, at an art reception in two locations:  Art Mob Studios & Marketplace, 124 4th Avenue East, and at Art On 4th Gallery & Studio at 125 4th Avenue West, in Hendersonville, on Friday, Apr. 7, from 5 -7:30pm. The two galleries are hosting the receptions with the artists, and the sponsors of the banners, in attendance.

The art reception and sale celebrates the first annual ArtScape Hendersonville banners. Artwork selected as a result of a jury process has been reproduced on 40 banners that will hang from lamp posts on Hendersonville’s Main Street, Seventh Avenue, and side streets for a year beginning in March 2017. In providing a unique twist on an outdoor gallery experience, the project’s objective is to create an outdoor gallery experience making Hendersonville an exciting and unique art destination.

The 40 artists will be at the opening reception, and are offering the artwork depicted on the banners for sale to the public. Live music, appetizers, and drinks will be provided at both locations.

Led by Hendersonville artist, Costanza Knight, the ArtScape Hendersonville Banners Committee formed as a result of a collaboration between the Art League of Henderson County, the Arts Council of Henderson County, and Downtown Hendersonville, Inc. ArtScape Banners Hendersonville received funding from the Community Foundation of Henderson County.

The Arts Council of Henderson County is a community organization that promotes, advocates for and nurtures the arts in Henderson County and Western North Carolina. Its office is located at 401 North Main St., Ste. 302, Hendersonville, NC 28792. (Entrance on Fourth Avenue West.)

The Arts Council is supported in part by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources; funds administered by the Community Foundation of Henderson County, Henderson County, Henderson County Tourism Development Authority, and the City of Hendersonville.

For more information please contact the Arts Council by e-mail at (acofhc@bellsouth.net) or call 828/693-8504. The web address is (www.acofhc.org).

Theatre Art Galleries in High Point, NC, Offers Opportunity for Muralists and Public Art – Deadline Apr. 7, 2017

March 18, 2017

Theatre Art Galleries (TAG), in High Point, NC, is seeking artists to design murals for potential sites (exterior walls) in High Point. The designs will be part of an exhibit revolving around public art to be held at TAG, with prize money and potential opportunities for execution of winning mural designs.

Objective: Generate interest in and raise awareness of public art by presenting an exhibit showcasing the design concepts of muralists.


Brian’s Frog Mural

Date of exhibit:  June 1 – August 4, 2017

Concept: Potential sites (walls) will be identified and photographed by TAG.

Selected artists may design for a specific wall (to be assigned by TAG prior to the design work) or may choose to submit a design that will then be superimposed on a wall at TAG’s discretion (after the design is submitted.)

TAG will superimpose designs onto photographs and enlarged on foamcore for exhibit

Interested artists should submit images of previous mural work along with contact information to info@tagart.org.  Full information is listed on the website (www.tagart.org).

Timeframe:

March 17-April 7:  Call to artists

April 11: Selected artists notified

April 12-May 10:  Artists design

May 11:  Art submitted to TAG (deadline)

May 12-24:  Exhibit prepared (photographs enlarged with art superimposed)

May 25:  Exhibit installed

June 1:  Opening Reception

August 3:  Exhibit ends

Prize money:

1st place:  $500

2nd place:  $250

3rd place:  $100

Winners to be determined by impartial committee appointed by TAG.  Artists will retain all rights to their artwork.  Designs are for exhibit only and not for actual execution, although in some cases that could be a possibility.

For more information or questions please contact Jeff Horney, Executive Director, at 336/887-2137.

Inside/Out Brings Art to Area Neighborhoods in Charlotte, NC

February 28, 2017

Imagine encountering Andy Warhol’s “Marilyn” outside a YMCA or emerging artist Jordan Casteel’s “Kevin The Kite Man” in the middle of a park. Charlotteans will be able to participate in this experience beginning in April when the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art and the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture, in Charlotte, NC, launch Inside/Out Charlotte. The Inside/Out Charlotte initiative is a part of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation’s national effort to share collections and bring art into communities.

217charlotte-inside_out

This public exhibition and outreach program will reach into the greater Charlotte-Mecklenburg area to strengthen knowledge, understanding and appreciation for visual art. The program places framed, high-quality reproductions of artworks on display at the Bechtler Museum and Gantt Center for community members to encounter and enjoy programming specifically designed for each installation. Inside/Out Charlotte will launch in the spring highlighting artworks that reflect the diversity of the museums’ collections and broad interests in the communities.

The program started eight years ago at the Detroit Institute of Arts and now includes partners around the nation; the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Akron Art Museum, and Perez Art Museum Miami. The Knight Foundation has funded the expansion to additional cities including Charlotte.

“There’s something very powerful about seeing works of art in person. You become completely immersed. Inside/Out brings that experience to people, directly in their communities, and an amazing thing happens: entire neighborhoods, entire communities, start to talk about art,” said Victoria Rogers, vice president for arts at Knight Foundation.

Residents, families and friends in the participating communities will be able to walk through the park or hop on a bike and encounter art in unexpected places and enjoy each exciting outdoor exhibition. The Bechtler and the Gantt Center, in conjunction with the partner communities, will plan educational opportunities and other fun activities, such as bicycle and walking tours, community discussions, musical performances and more.

Inside/Out Charlotte is now in the process of asking city and community representatives, development authorities and arts organizations interested in being part of the museums’ new program. Communities can choose one of two exhibition periods: spring, from April to July, or fall, from September to December. Selected communities will have the opportunity to host five to eight reproductions within walking or bike-riding distance from each other. In all, up to 60 reproduced artworks will be on display around Charlotte in the spring and an additional 80 works in the fall.

Communities and businesses that take part will be promoted through the Inside/Out Charlotte website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and more. The museum installs the reproductions and can assist community leaders in developing educational programs that engage people and inspire them to visit the Bechtler and the Gantt Center. To learn more, visit the Inside/Out Charlotte website at (InsideOutCLT.org).

The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture presents, preserves and celebrates excellence in the art, history and culture of African-Americans and those of African descent. The Center is located at Levine Center for the Arts 551 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28202. Operating hours are Sun., from 1-5pm; Monday: Closed, Tue.-Sat., from 10am-5pm.

The Bechtler Museum of Modern Art is dedicated to the exhibition of mid-20th-century modern art. It is named after the family of Andreas Bechtler who assembled and inherited a collection created by seminal figures of modernism. The museum is located at Levine Center for the Arts, 420 South Tryon Street, Charlotte 28202. Operating hours are Mon., Wed., Thur., Fri, and Sat., 10am-5pm; Sun., noon-5pm; and closed Tue.

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is a national foundation with strong local roots. We invest in journalism, in the arts, and in the success of cities where brothers John S. and James L. Knight once published newspapers. Our goal is to foster informed and engaged communities, which we believe are essential for a healthy democracy.”

For further information contact Sharon Holm, Bechtler Museum of Modern Art Director of Marketing and Communications, by e-mail at (sharon.holm@bechtler.org) or call 704/353-9204.

The Arts Council of Wilmington and New Hanover County in Wilmington, NC, Calls for Submissions for Its Pedestrian Art Project – Deadline is February 28, 2017

February 8, 2017

The Arts Council of Wilmington and New Hanover County in Wilmington, NC, invites sculptors to submit proposals for its Pedestrian Art public sculpture program. Up to 12 works will be installed for one year at various locations in Wilmington, NC, beginning in April 2017.

The deadline for consideration is February 28, 2017.

Click here for more information at (http://artscouncilofwilmington.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/PedArt-2017-Call-for-Entries1.pdf).

The Arts Council is located at 221 N. Front Street, Suite 101, Wilmington, NC 28401

For further information call 910/343-0998, e-mail to (pedart@artswilmington.org) or visit (www.ArtsWilmington.org).