Archive for the ‘Arts Celebration’ Category

The Arts Center of Clemson in Clemson, SC, Offers TRIO 2017 – Nov. 16, 2017

October 30, 2017

The Arts Center of Clemson and Clemson Free Clinic in Clemson, SC, announce TRIO 2017 – Art, Food and Spirits at The Arts Center of Clemson, 212 Butler Street, Clemson, SC, on Thursday, Nov, 16, 2017, from 6-9pm.

The Arts Center of Clemson and Clemson Free Clinic invite you to celebrate two nonprofits serving the Clemson Community with an evening of art, food, spirits and entertainment.

Mark your calendars for this special, fun filled evening to benefit two important non-profits serving the Clemson community. Your ticket gives you the opportunity to enjoy Wine and Beer Tastings, Hearty Hors d ’Oeuvres, a Silent Auction and Music by B J Callahan.

Tickets are $40 each or 4 for $150 and are available at (www.explorearts.org) or by calling Clemson Free Clinic at 864/654-8277. All proceeds benefit The Arts Center of Clemson and Clemson Free Clinic.

Handicapped Parking ONLY is offered at The Arts Center, 212 Butler Street in Clemson. General Parking is available behind Beef O’Brady’s, 101 Canoy Lane in Clemson with frequent round trip Catbus transportation to and from the event.

For further info e-mail to (info@explorearts.org) or call 864/633-5051.

Advertisements

STARworks in Star, NC, Presents a Hot Glass, Cold Beer Event on Sept. 14, 2017

August 31, 2017

Hot Glass Cold Beer (HGCB) returns to STARworks in Star, NC, on Sept. 14, 2017, from 5:30 to 7:30pm with guest artist Amanda Patenaude.

Patenaude will lead the glassblowing demonstration. She and the STARworks Glass team will work together to create a glass raccoon.


STARworks Glass guest artist Amanda Patenaude attaches an ear to the glass raccoon she made for the February 2016 Hot Glass Cold Beer. She will create another raccoon with the assistance of the STARworks Glass team at this Hot Glass Cold Beer.

The River Wild food truck, based out of Lake Tillery, will be on site with offerings of fish tacos, burgers, fries and more.

HGCB, held on the second Thursday of every month, features beer from Four Saints Brewing Company, based in Asheboro and wine from Stony Mountain Vineyards, based in Albemarle.

All ages are invited to watch the free glassblowing demonstration. Visitors, ages 21 and older who purchase a hand-crafted STARworks drinking glass will receive a ticket for a complimentary beer or wine during the demonstration. Beer and wine may also be purchased directly at the bar.

Patenaude is a multi-media artist based out of Brooklyn, NY, where she works as a glass production manager and devotes time to her personal art practice. She uses glass and its properties to investigate issues of waste and reuse, new forms of community building and our evolving roles in the environment. Patenaude received a BFA from Illinois State University where she worked in both the glass and ceramic departments.

STARworks is a Central Park NC project. Central Park NC is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the economy of the region by focusing on the sustainable use of our natural and cultural resources.

STARworks is located at 100 Russell Drive in Star, just off I-73/74 in northern Montgomery County. For more information, call 910/428-9001, or visit (www.StarworksNC.org).

New World Festival of the Arts in Manteo, NC, Announced Award Recipients

August 31, 2017

In perfect summer weather, over 75 world-class artists, with the backdrop of the Manteo, NC’s waterfront provided the ideal setting for the “36th Annual New World Festival of the Arts” on Aug. 16 and 17, 2017.


Best in Show Award Recipient Jennifer Rose Hyde. Photo courtesy of Tatum Clements.

Mixed media artist Lisa Beth Robinson, who is an assistant professor at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC, judged the show. She observed watercolor, acrylic, photography, jewelry, ceramics, wood design, leatherwork, and many other media.


Third place award recipient Gregory Bryant. Photo courtesy of Tatum Clements.

“Jurying the show presented me with difficult choices; I saw a great deal of beautiful and finely crafted work,” said Robinson. “My first consideration was, of course, the formal properties of the work: craft, skill, creativity, and concept. Beyond that, I was looking for artists who used their media in ways that exceeded the traditional boundaries of the material with an exceptional level of skill and work that appeared ripe for pushing these boundaries.”

Robinson carefully selected the following winners:
Best In Show- Jennifer Rose Hyde from Manteo, NC. (fiber/jewelry)
Second Place- Sheila Nash from Norfolk, VA, (watercolor)
Third Place- Gregory Bryant from Norfolk, VA, (jewelry)
Merit Awards: Cammie Hall from Kitty Hawk, NC, (jewelry), Cyndi Goetcheus Sarfan from Kill Devil Hills, NC, (photography), Dawn Gray Moraga from Kitty Hawk, NC. (acrylic), and Laura Frye from Washington, NC (watercolor).

Best In Show winner Jennifer Rose Hyde paints with needles and threads that compose wearable art with vibrant colors and textures. Second place winner Sheila Nash is a watercolor artist who paints on paper with transparent watercolor. Third place winner Gregory Bryant’s unique porcelain jewelry has an ancient, yet modern design. “What a nice surprise it was to get this award,” said artist Gregory Bryant. “This was my third year participating in the show. I continue to be lured by the charm, hospitality, and unique character of Manteo. I really enjoyed my customers- a great mix of locals and vacationers.”

Presented by PNC Bank for the third consecutive year, the New World Festival of the Arts is a Manteo tradition that provides awareness of current trends in the visual arts while acquainting visitors with the historic Town of Manteo.

Thank you to presenting sponsor PNC Bank, corporate sponsor SAGA Construction & Development, event partner The Town of Manteo, and show organizers Erin Johnson and Louise Sanderlin.

“I am grateful for the opportunity to help organize this show,” said jewelry artist and DCAC staff member Erin Johnson. “As a graduate of The College of the Albemarle’s fine arts program and a budding artist, this show has been a wonderful learning experience. I enjoyed working with all of the New World Festival artists and seeing their artwork.”

This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Dare County Arts Council is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit arts organization dedicated to supporting the arts in Dare County.

For more information about the Dare County Arts Council’s upcoming events, please call 252/473.-5558 or visit (www.DareArts.org).

 

There is Still Booth Space Available at the LIVE OAK ART + MUSIC FEST in Conway, SC, – Oct. 7, 2017

August 30, 2017

LIVE OAK ART + MUSIC FEST is a showcase of the areas best local artists, crafters, makers, and musicians, that takes place in Conway, SC. Plan to bring a bring a chair and enjoy a full day of music under the oaks. Coolers are welcome.

When: Saturday, October 7th, 10 am – 5 pm

Where: 1102 3rd Ave. (under the oaks at the Horry County Court House)

Our LIVE OAK MARKET features a wide variety of goods for sale from local artists, artisans, and makers. There will also be local culinary and produce for sale. The market is all about handmade, homemade and local; a perfect place to shop for those unique holiday gifts. Food vendors accepted!

Reserve Vendor Space Here (https://liveoakartandmusicfest.acuityscheduling.com/schedule.php).

Potteries in Seagrove, NC, Invite You to the Tea with Seagrove Pottery Gallery Crawl – Aug. 26, 2017

August 9, 2017

On Aug. 26, 2017, spend the day in Seagrove, NC, sampling iced teas and homemade treats. Relax at your own pace as you visit Blue Hen Pottery, Dean & Martin Pottery, Dover Pottery, Eck McCanless Pottery, From the Ground Up, Thomas Pottery and Red Hare Pottery. Browse shops for new wares highlighting tea. Shops are open from 10am -5pm. Pick up a pottery map at your first stop.

Visit (http://teawithseagrovepotters.webstarts.com/) for more information.

Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center and the University of North Carolina Asheville to Present 9th Annual Reviewing Black Mountain College Conference in Asheville, NC – Sept. 29 – Oct. 1, 2017

July 31, 2017

International conference gathers artists and scholars who explore the history and legacy of the groundbreaking Black Mountain College, where Willem de Kooning, John Cage, Buckminster Fuller, Merce Cunningham, Franz Kline and Robert Rauschenberg collaborated in the Mid-20th Century.

This Year’s Conference Introduces Two New Programs:

The BMCM+AC Performance Initiative, a Multi-Part Project Offering New Dimensions to the Museum’s Visual Art Exhibitions, Including Brooklyn Youth Chorus’ Multimedia Stage Work Black Mountain Songs, Curated by Bryce Dessner (The National) and Richard Reed Parry (Arcade Fire) and Performed During the Conference; and Dance Heginbotham’s The Principles of Uncertainty, a New Dance Theater Work from Choreographer John Heginbotham and Author/Illustrator Maira Kalman, in March 2018
The Active Archive, a Stream of Programs Pairing the Museum’s Extensive Collection with Contemporary Artists, Curators and Thinkers, Beginning with an Exhibition Curated by Interdisciplinary Artist Martha McDonald. Conference Will Include 60+ Presenters and Keynote Addresses by Mel Chin and the Black Mountain Songs Creative Team

The Black Mountain College Museum + ArtsCenter (BMCM+AC) and the University of North Carolina Asheville are pleased to announce the ninth annual ReVIEWING Black Mountain College conference, which brings together artists and scholars to explore the history and legacy of the pioneering Black Mountain College (BMC), Sept. 29 – Oct. 1, 2017, in Asheville, NC.

In the mid-20th Century, a group of American artists and European refugees including Josef and Anni Albers, Willem de Kooning, John Cage, Buckminster Fuller, Merce Cunningham, Franz Kline and Robert Rauschenberg converged at the College and developed new artistic practices and an innovative culture of cross-disciplinary collaboration that came to define the American century. ReVIEWING Black Mountain College 9 celebrates and furthers the continuing relevance of this spirit.

Founded in 1933, Black Mountain College was one of the leading experimental liberal art schools in America until its closure in 1957. After the Bauhaus in Germany closed due to mounting antagonism from the Nazi Party, Josef and Anni Albers accepted an offer to join the BMC faculty. During their 16-year tenure in North Carolina, the Alberses helped model the college’s interdisciplinary curriculum on that of the Bauhaus, attracting an unmatched roster of teachers and students including many of the 20th century’s foremost American and European artists. Founded by arts advocate Mary Holden in 1993, BMCM+AC celebrates the history and impact of BMC as a forerunner in progressive interdisciplinary education through exhibitions, publications, lectures, films, seminars and oral histories. On July 1, 2016, BMCM+AC doubled its footprint in downtown Asheville, opening a second multi-use gallery space and study center, and developed a formal partnership with UNC Asheville.

The BMCM+AC Performance Initiative

Amidst a recent resurgence of public interest in Black Mountain College, BMCM+AC and UNC Asheville have launched a new Performance Initiative to offer residencies, workshops and performances of world-class interdisciplinary works that offer new dimensions to the Museum’s ambitious visual art exhibitions and illuminate and carry on the College’s legacy.

The BMCM+AC Performance Initiative kicks off during ReVIEWING Black Mountain College 9 with the Southeast Premiere of the acclaimed work Black Mountain Songs. Commissioned and produced by the Brooklyn Youth Chorus and BAM, and curated by Bryce Dessner (The National) and Richard Reed Parry (Arcade Fire), Black Mountain Songs is inspired by Black Mountain College, its prolific community of artists, and their work, and rekindles the College’s utopian spirit. The Chorus performs music written for them by eight composers: Dessner and Parry, as well as Pulitzer Prize-winner Caroline Shaw, Nico Muhly, Aleksandra Vrebalov, John King, Tim Hecker, and Jherek Bischoff. Featuring contributions from filmmaker Matt Wolf (Wild Combination: A Portrait of Arthur Russell), Black Mountain Songs is an expansive choral and visual work. This exquisite production premiered at BAM in 2014. New Amsterdam Records released an acclaimed recording of the work—Brooklyn Youth Chorus’ first album—earlier this year.

The BMCM+AC Performance Initiative will continue during the week of March 13, 2018, when BMCM+AC and UNC Asheville present The Principles of Uncertainty, a new evening-length dance theater work by choreographer John Heginbotham and author/illustrator Maira Kalman. Heginbotham will direct and choreograph the work, while Kalman will oversee all elements of design—sets, props, projections and costumes. Kalman will also be present on stage, alongside six members of Dance Heginbotham, an actor and live musicians. Composer Colin Jacobsen—a member of string quartet Brooklyn Rider, chamber ensemble The Knights, and Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble—serves as Music Director of the project. Members of The Knights will perform live.

Active Archive: Martha McDonald

“We do not always create ‘works of art,’ but rather experiments; it is not our ambition to fill museums: we are gathering experience.”—Josef Albers, Artist, Black Mountain College Faculty 1933-49

The Active Archive represents an ambitious new direction for Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center (BMCM+AC), both programmatically and artistically. While BMCM+AC has included contemporary work in past exhibitions, this will be the first time it commissions new work and offers an artist residency.

The Active Archive Initiative will give interdisciplinary artist Martha McDonald time to conduct research, incubate ideas, and make new work. In the research and planning phase of the project, she will explore how objects and ideas from the museum’s collection, the historic Lake Eden campus, and the city of Asheville itself can be stitched together to reveal new dimensions of the Black Mountain College (BMC) story, and how it connects to contemporary culture and art practice.

Martha McDonald is an interdisciplinary artist whose performances and installations feature handcrafted costumes and objects that she activates through gestures of making, unmaking and singing to transmit narrative. McDonald’s practice often focuses on site-specific “interventions” in historic house museums, rare book libraries, cultural institutions, and botanic gardens to investigate the sites and their stories in order to explore how public places connect with personal histories and emotional states. Her work involves deep archive/collections research in order to uncover hidden or forgotten histories. She invites audiences to experience sites and collections from an artist’s perspective.

McDonald’s project will bring the archive and ideas of BMC alive between Sept. 29 and Dec. 30, 2017, in both BMCM+AC exhibition spaces in downtown Asheville. The project includes an exhibition, a 96-page catalogue, and community programs including a performance, conference presentation, and a gallery walk-through/talk. McDonald’s Active Archive work will create a contemporary platform to advance the discourse surrounding the living ideas and history of BMC. The result will be a gathering place for community conversations among artists, audiences, scholars and students within the new exhibition.

In one gallery, McDonald will curate an exhibition of BMC artwork exploring the importance of color, process and experimentation at BMC. The second gallery will focus on BMC’s rich history of experimental theatre and performance art, stretching from Xanti Schawinsky’s early Bauhaus-inspired theater experiments in 1937-38 through the first Happening at BMC in 1952, conceived by John Cage and David Tudor and including Merce Cunningham, Robert Rauschenberg, MC Richards and Charles Olson.

Conference Presenters and Keynote Addresses

ReVIEWING Black Mountain College will feature over 60 interdisciplinary presenters from across the United States as well as Lithuania, Russia, and Canada. Topics addressed will include the artistic practices of BMC artists Josef and Anni Albers, Ruth Asawa, Ray Johnson, Merce Cunningham, and John Cage as well as the poetics of Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, Hilda Morley, and John Weiners. The conference will feature two keynote addresses: one by conceptual artist Mel Chin, on Friday, September 29, and another, about the composition and performance of Black Mountain Songs, in the form of a panel discussion with members of the creative team and others, on Saturday, Sept. 30.

Ticketing and Locations

Most of the events comprising ReVIEWING Black Mountain College 9 will take place on the UNC Asheville campus at the Reuter Center. Advance tickets are $40 for current members of BMCM+AC and UNC Asheville’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, and $75 for non-members (BMCM+AC annual membership included). This price will increase to $100 for non-members at the door on Sept. 29. Optional discounted tickets to the Black Mountain Songs performances, on Sept. 29 & 30, are available to conference attendees for $10, along with an optional tour of the BMC Lake Eden Campus on Oct. 1 for $15. Both add-ons can be purchased with conference admission at (reviewing.brownpapertickets.com).

The Black Mountain Songs performances will take place at the Diana Wortham Theatre in downtown Asheville. Tickets can be purchased for $20 ($12 for those aged 18 and under) here.

About the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center

The Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center (BMCM+AC) preserves and continues the legacy of educational and artistic innovation of Black Mountain College (BMC). The institution achieves its mission through collection, conservation and educational activities including exhibitions, publications and public programs.

Arts advocate Mary Holden founded BMCM+AC in 1993 to celebrate the history of Black Mountain College as a forerunner in progressive interdisciplinary education and to explore its extraordinary impact on modern and contemporary art, dance, theater, music and performance. Today, the museum remains committed to educating the public about BMC’s history and raising awareness of its extensive legacy. BMCM+AC’s goal is to provide a gathering point for people from a variety of backgrounds to interact through art, ideas and discourse.

About Black Mountain College

The story of Black Mountain College begins in 1933 and comprises a fascinating chapter in the history of education and the arts. Conceived by John A. Rice, a brilliant and mercurial scholar who left Rollins College in a storm of controversy, Black Mountain College was born out of a desire to create a new type of college based on John Dewey’s principles of progressive education. The events that precipitated the college’s founding occurred simultaneously with the rise of Adolf Hitler, the closing of the Bauhaus school in Germany, and the beginning of the persecution of artists and intellectuals in Europe. Some of these refugees found their way to Black Mountain, either as students or faculty. Meanwhile, the United States was mired in the Great Depression.

The founders of the college believed that the study and practice of art were indispensable aspects of a student’s general liberal arts education, and they hired Josef Albers to be the first art teacher. Speaking not a word of English, he and his wife Anni left the turmoil in Hitler’s Germany and crossed the Atlantic Ocean by boat to teach art at this small, rebellious college in the mountains of North Carolina.

Black Mountain College was fundamentally different from other colleges and universities of the time. It was owned and operated by the faculty and was committed to democratic governance and to the idea that the arts are central to the experience of learning. All members of the college community participated in its operation, including farm work, construction projects, and kitchen duty. Twenty minutes east of Asheville, the secluded environment fostered a strong sense of individuality and creative intensity.

Legendary even in its own time, Black Mountain College attracted and created maverick spirits, some of whom went on to become well-known and extremely influential individuals in the latter half of the 20th century. A partial list includes Willem and Elaine de Kooning, Robert Rauschenberg, Josef and Anni Albers, Jacob Lawrence, Merce Cunningham, John Cage, Cy Twombly, Kenneth Noland, Susan Weil, Vera B. Williams, Ben Shahn, Ruth Asawa, Franz Kline, Arthur Penn, Buckminster Fuller, M.C. Richards, Francine du Plessix Gray, Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, Dorothea Rockburne and many others who have made an impact on the world in a significant way. Even now, decades after its closing in 1957, the powerful influence of Black Mountain College continues to reverberate.

About the Artists and Speakers

Brooklyn Youth Chorus (co-commissioner, producer, performer, Black Mountain Songs), now celebrating its 25th anniversary, is a collective of young singers and vocal ensembles re-envisioning choral music performance through artistic innovation, collaboration, and their distinctively beautiful sound. With an incredibly versatile range and repertoire, Brooklyn Youth Chorus combines intensive voice training and music study with exceptional performance experiences. Founded in 1992, Brooklyn Youth Chorus’s after-school program encompasses over 500 students in multi-level training divisions and advanced performing ensembles. With an emphasis on commissioning, the Chorus’s repertoire includes more than 100 original works and world premieres.

Bryce Dessner (creator, co-curator, composer, Black Mountain Songs) is a Brooklyn-based composer, guitarist, and curator who is also a member of the Grammy Award-nominated band the National. Dessner’s recent commissions include pieces for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the National Audiovisual Institute of Poland, the Grammy Award-winning Kronos Quartet, and the new music ensemble eighth blackbird, among others. The first recordings of Dessner’s compositions, performed by Kronos Quartet, were released in 2013 by Anti on an album entitled Aheym. In 2014 Deutsche Grammophon/Universal Music Classics released St. Carolyn By the Sea; Suite from the Paul Thomas Anderson film There Will Be Blood, which features three of Dessner’s orchestral works performed by the Copenhagen Philharmonic and conducted by André de Ridder.

Richard Reed Parry (co-curator, composer, Black Mountain Songs) is the red-headed musical polymath at the heart of the inventive art rock band Arcade Fire, but his work and story reach far beyond. Born in Toronto and raised in a community of ex-pat British isles folk musicians, Parry studied electro-acoustics and contemporary dance at Concordia University. As well as contributing to Arcade Fire’s success over the past 10 years, he also released his debut album as a composer this year entitled Music for Heart and Breath on Deutsche Grammophon. Parry has also written commissioned works for Kronos Quartet, yMusic, and Bryce Dessner, and his chamber works also have been performed by the Calder Quartet and Who’s WhoWho’s Who Warhol Dervish. He has also collaborated and performed with artists like David Bowie, The National, the Unicorns, Neil Young, Mick Jagger, Sam Amidon, Nadia Sirota, Colin Stetson, Little Scream, La La La Human Steps, and Islands.

Maira Kalman (co-creator, designer,The Principles of Uncertainty) is the author and illustrator of 18 children’s books including Fireboat, Looking at Lincoln, and What Pete Ate, as well as five books for adults. Her online columns for the New York Times were compiled into two volumes, The Principles of Uncertainty and The Pursuit of Happiness. Her two most recent books about design, My Favorite Things and Ah-Ha to Zig Zag were recently released in conjunction with Maira Kalman: My Favorite Things – the exhibit she curated for the re-opening of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum in New York City. Maira’s recent publications include Girls on Lawns with text by Daniel Handler, in conjunction with the photography department of the Museum of Modern Art, and Beloved Dog.

Originally from Anchorage, Alaska, John Heginbotham (co-creator, choreographer,The Principles of Uncertainty) graduated from The Juilliard School in 1993, and was a member of the Mark Morris Dance Group from 1998 – 2012. In 2011 he founded Dance Heginbotham (DH). The ensemble has been presented and commissioned by Bard College, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, The Joyce Theater, The Kennedy Center, and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, among others. In the spring of 2016, DH toured to Indonesia, Laos, and the Philippines DanceMotion USASM, a project of the US Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), produced by BAM. A frequent collaborator with live music, John has worked with numerous composers and musicians including Alarm Will Sound, American Classical Orchestra, Brooklyn Rider, Fischerspooner, Tyondai Braxton, Colin Jacobsen, Gabriel Kahane, and Shara Worden.

Martha McDonald (curator, Active Archive exhibition) is an interdisciplinary artist whose performances and installations feature handcrafted costumes and objects that she activates through gestures of making and unmaking and singing to transmit narrative. McDonald’s practice often focuses on site-specific “interventions” in historic house museums, libraries and gardens which investigate the sites and their stories to explore how these public places connect with personal histories and emotional states.

McDonald’s work has been produced in Berlin at Brotfabrik; in Melbourne, Australia at Linden Centre for Contemporary Arts and Craft Victoria; in Sydney, Australia, at Elizabeth Bay House; in New York at P.S. 122, The Joyce SoHo, HERE Center for the Arts and Galapagos Arts Space; in Washington, DC, at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery; in San Francisco at Theatre of Yugen; in Chicago at Links Hall; in Baltimore at the Evergreen Museum & Library and 14K Cabaret; and in Philadelphia at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Painted Bride Art Center, The Prince Music Theater and the Philadelphia Live Arts Festival. She has been selected for artist residencies at Monash University (Melbourne, Australia), The MacDowell Colony (Peterborough, NH), Evergreen Museum & Library at Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD) and The Rosenbach Museum & Library (Philadelphia, PA). She has received fellowships from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the Independence Foundation. She completed a Masters of Fine Art at Monash University through a Monash Research Graduate Scholarship.

Mel Chin (keynote speaker) was born in Houston, Texas, in 1951. Chin’s art, which is both analytical and poetic, evades easy classification. He is known for the broad range of approaches in his art, including works that require multi-disciplinary, collaborative teamwork and works that conjoin cross-cultural aesthetics with complex ideas.

Chin also insinuates art into unlikely places, including destroyed homes, toxic landfills, and even popular television, investigating how art can provoke greater social awareness and responsibility. He developed Revival Field (1989-ongoing), a project that has been a pioneer in the field of “green remediation,” the use of plants to remove toxic, heavy metals from the soil. From 1995-1998 he formed the collective the GALA Committee, which produced In the Name of the Place, a conceptual public art project conducted on American prime-time television. In KNOWMAD, Chin worked with software engineers to create a video game based on rug patterns of nomadic people facing cultural disappearance. His film 9-11/9-11, a hand-drawn, 24 minute, joint Chilean/U.S. Production, won the prestigious Pedro Sienna Award for Best Animation from Chile’s National Council for the Arts and Cultures, in 2007. Chin also promotes “works of art” that have the ultimate effect of benefiting science, as in Revival Field, and also in the recent Operation Paydirt/Fundred Dollar Bill Project, an attempt to make New Orleans a lead-safe city. These projects are consistent with a conceptual philosophy that emphasizes the practice of art to include sculpting and bridging the natural and social ecology.

Chin’s work was documented in the popular PBS program “Art of the 21st Century.” He has received numerous awards and grants from organizations such as the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council for the Arts, Art Matters, Creative Capital, and the Penny McCall, Pollock/Krasner, Joan Mitchell, Rockefeller and Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundations, among others.

For more information, please contact Blake Zidell or Ron Gaskill at Blake Zidell & Associates by e-mail at (blake@blakezidell.com), (ron@blakezidell.com) or call 718/643-9052.

AFAS Center for the Arts Opens in Winston-Salem, NC

May 31, 2017

The sleek new AFAS Center for the Arts, located at the corner of Liberty and Seventh streets in Winston-Salem, NC, opened to the public on Saturday, May 6, 2017. The local nonprofit organization Art for Art’s Sake (AFAS) commissioned the 14,500 square foot, three-story building, which was constructed over a period of 15 months.

The Center’s official opening will be celebrated with a public ribbon-cutting ceremony at 2pm, on May 6, accompanied by live music, food trucks, ARTivity on the Green mural wall painting and family activities.

This latest addition to the city’s burgeoning Arts District consolidates several AFAS activities and locations that were previously scattered throughout downtown. The building houses AFAS’ headquarters, as well as Red Dog Gallery, Unleashed Arts Center and Studio 2, a jewelry studio. There are also 10 artist studios available for lease at affordable rates.

The Center’s location – adjacent to ARTivity on the Green art park – extends the Arts District’s footprint into a previously underdeveloped area of the city.

Harry Knabb, AFAS chairman and chief executive, said the new headquarters underscores AFAS’ continued commitment to the Arts District and the city’s arts community overall, while also ensuring the viability of AFAS for generations to come.

ARTivity on the Green and the AFAS Center for the Arts have both been made possible via generous grants – primarily one from the Thomas J. Regan Jr. Foundation – and both projects have enlisted the professional skills of several local businesses; STITCH Design Shop and Frank L. Blum Construction Co. served as the architect and general contractor for both projects, respectively.

For further information contact Harry Knabb, AFAS Chair, by calling 336/416-0089 or Sylvia Green, AFAS Vice Chair at 336/782-5958.

Photo caption: Special translucent panels allow the new AFAS Center for the Arts building to literally glow from within at night.

Folk Art Center in Asheville, NC, Offers Fiber Weekend – May 13-14, 2017

May 11, 2017

On Saturday, May 13 and Sunday, May 14, 2017, the fiber community of the Southern Highland Craft Guild will gather in sharing their knowledge and skills. An open and free event to the public, Fiber Weekend is held annually at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Asheville, NC. From 10-4pm on Saturday, more than two dozen members will be demonstrating their craft processes, with and invitation for visitors to get hands-on with all sorts of fiber. Sunday will hold the 18th annual Fashion Show of Wearable Art from 1-4pm. Southern Highland Craft Guild is proud to announce Echoview Fibermill, JB Media Group and SPC Manufacturing as sponsors of Fiber Weekend.

Generally, fiber wares and products undergo a minimum of five processes for its completion, including carding, spinning, dyeing, weaving and sewing. Due to these multiple stages, often small, specialized groups form in mastering a single process. Groups such as the Embroiderer’s Guild, Tarheels Ruggers, and The Mountain Lacers all will be showcasing these niche skills on Saturday.


Spinners from the Blue Ridge region gather at their wheels as they process fibers into yarn. Photo by Diana Gates.

“These organizations provide space for collaboration, innovation, as well as education,” says Guild Education Coordinator Deb Schillo. “Throughout history there have been groups forming around fiber, and it is certainly a testament to how important craft is in building community.”

Schillo is also the librarian and archivist at the Southern Highland Craft Guild. She and regionally acclaimed weaver Barbara Miller just finished their second publication about fiber. Frances Goodrich’s “Coverlet and Counterpane Drafts” will be available to the public for purchase at the event for $45. Miller’s knowledge about fiber is extensive, and has been able to highlight how certain processes have transformed.

“When we first began to read the different dye recipes that were being used several decades ago, we had to make sure that folks did not repeat them,” says Miller. “With some asking to add lye, following with directive to taste the water for sweetness…well, we had to say, ‘don’t try this at home’!

The dye process of yarns and fabrics is often one of the more laborious parts of transforming fiber. Master dyer Dede Styles will be using many natural flora found in the Western North Carolina region.

Beginning with the source, Anthony Cole will be up on the hill shearing sheep throughout the day. Julie Wilson will also be working with different animals, such as alpacas and rabbits, in studying various fiber structures. She also will be carding and spinning. Other members will be showcasing tapestry weaving, crochet, knitting, macrame, doll making, sewing, quilting, felting, tatting, rug hooking, embroidery, lace making and more.

To see these processes in finished pieces, be sure to attend the two fashion shows on Sunday hosted by weaver Liz Spear of Waynesville. Almost two decades in production, Spear has consistently elevated the works of members with ample commentary on design and technique. There will be work from 40 Guild members, showing a total of almost 100 different outfits.

Textile arts are known for building a sense of community, and to celebrate this, the Guild invites visitors to Fiber Weekend to bring their own handwork, whether it be crochet, embroidery or spinning. Weather permitting we would like to fill the hill behind the Folk Art Center auditorium with people engaged in fiber arts. Bring a blanket and enjoy a spring afternoon of craft.

The Southern Highland Craft Guild is a non-profit, educational organization established in 1930 to cultivate the crafts and makers of the Southern Highlands for the purpose of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation. The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior. The Folk Art Center is located at Milepost 382 of the Blue Ridge Parkway, just north of the Highway 70 entrance in east Asheville, NC.

JB Media Group is a digital marketing agency providing strategy, SEO, social media, content writing, advertising, and PR services. We help social enterprises, mission-driven companies, and nonprofits build a better world.

Echoview is an innovative fiber processing and manufacturing hub that’s  a catalyst for connecting community with commerce. We deliver products and services that fuel the American spirit of hard work and self-expression.

SPC Manufacturing Company is a contract, sewing/manufacturing company located in Eastern Tennessee that provides full service for custom products – specializing in bags, cases and containers – from design and development through prototyping, production, silk screening and packaging.

Fiber Weekend 2017, Demonstrating Makers:
Sandy Adair, tapestry weaving
Rita de Maintenon, heritage lace + crochet
Jim Gentry, macrame
Lin Oglesby, knitting + crochet
Amy Putansu, dyeing + weaving
Embroiderer’s Guild, embroidery
Charlie Patricolo, doll making
Lorraine Cathey, felting
Barbara Miller, weaving
Mary Nichols, spinning
Dede Styles, natural dyes
Connie Brown, quilting
Martine House, embroidery
Laura Gaskin, quilting + embroidery
Elizabeth Garlington, quilting
Carlson Tuttle, tatting
Tarheel Ruggers, rug hooking
The Mountain Lacers, lace making
Anthony Cole, sheep shearing

For further information contact Hannah Barry, Public Relations + Communications, Southern Highland Craft Guild, by e-mail at (hannah@craftguild.org) call 828/298-7928 x 309 or visit (www.craftguild.org).

The 7th Annual Clemson Festival of Arts Takes Place in Clemson, SC – May 20, 2017

May 10, 2017

Many of the area’s best artists will present their work – including clay, painting, jewelry, fiber, glass, sculpture and more – at the 7th Annual Clemson Festival of Arts on Saturday, May 20, 2017, from 10am to 5pm.  A ‘Parade of Characters’ for all ages featuring princesses, superheroes and other popular costumes kicks off the event at 9:30am and is followed by art demonstrations, hands-on art projects, music and food throughout the day.

The Clemson Festival of Arts is unique in our area. Children, family and friends will enjoy an ‘art full’ Saturday that offers something for everyone.

In addition to the fine, handcrafted art for sale, everyone will enjoy the artist demonstrations and a visit to the outdoor ‘pop up’ gallery. This year’s Festival features the largest community artwork piece yet and everyone is invited to help create it – it’s an amazing, one-of-a kind work!

No child will be bored at the Kids Art Park! Creative, fun, hands-on projects available throughout the day include:
-a cardboard box maze to explore and decorate with graffiti
-teepees to decorate and enclose by yarnbombing
-a variety of devices to make and decorate bubbles
-a dress up stage and mini plays
-a woodworking area to hammer together individual creations
-hat making by transforming brown bags and scrap paper into crazy head gear
-a paint station offering three different painting techniques including pendulums, foam stamping and squirt bottles
-and, of course, the ever popular face painting

For adults who want to experience art in a ‘close up and personal’ way, the Art in Action tents offer projects throughout the day that are the perfect way to give it a try! Create a ‘make & take’ clay Angel or Pinwheel Christmas ornament, a mixed media piece under the guidance of Ellen Kochansky, a unique jewelry piece, or any of several painting projects.

Music abounds throughout the Festival with the sounds of Betsy Bish, Sam Winzenread & Accompanist, SEWA Drummers and Rob Seel.

Most everyone will work up an appetite, so the covered Food Court offers food and beverage selections from Friends of the Farm, The Arts Center’s Hot Dog Stand, Super Taco, Little Orbits and King of Pops.

Be sure not to miss this fun-filled Festival, which gets bigger and better with each passing year. The Festival is FREE and takes place in downtown Clemson at Catherine Smith Plaza, Jaycee Park and Edgewood Avenue.

Visit (www.explorearts.org) for Festival activity details and project and demonstration times.

2017 Ag + Art Tour of York County in Rock Hill, SC, Calls for Participation – Deadline April 21, 2017

April 4, 2017

In partnership with the Arts Council of York County, the Ag + Art Tour is now accepting applications for artists and artisans interested in participating in the 2017 Ag + Art Tour of York County, SC, on Saturday, June 10 and Sunday, June 11, 2017. For this program, artists and artisans are defined as individuals who make handcrafted products without the use of kits or commercial models, and whose primary components are not manufactured. Examples include but are not limited to: painters, potters, weavers, quilters, jewelers, acoustic musicians, and artisan bakers. Storytellers and musicians may also apply to be considered. Those selected to participate in the Tour will be located at Farm Sites and can sell their products.

Artisans are encouraged to participate in their home county of residence. Artisans can participate on different weekends but must complete a separate application for each county/weekend. There is no fee to participate. Artists and artisans may apply online at (http://www.agandarttour.com/artisans). Artisans whose applications are received after Friday, April 21, 2017 will not be included on printed materials; however, they will be listed on (www.AgAndArtTour.com).

The South Carolina Ag + Art Tour is the nation’s largest free, self- guided tour of farms featuring local artisans and farmer’s markets. Set to take place at local farms and farm stands in 11 counties across South Carolina – Chester, Chesterfield, Darlington, Fairfield, Florence, Horry, Kershaw, Lancaster, Newberry, Union and York Counties, visitors have the chance to see first-hand where their food comes from, watch artists in action, purchase homemade and homegrown goods, and learn more about rural life. The Tour will be held each weekend in June, on Saturday, from 9am-5pm, and from 1-5pm on Sunday. Different counties are participating each weekend, giving visitors the opportunity to explore more farms and farm stands across the state.

The first Ag + Art Tour started in 2012 in York County to bring together agriculture and art. York County hosted close to 3,000 visitors during the inaugural year. The Tour expanded to include Lancaster County in 2013 with 6,000 total visitors, and added its third and fourth counties to include Chester and Fairfield in 2014 with a total of 8,000 attendees for the entire tour. In 2015, the Tour welcomed its fifth county – Union. Chesterfield, Darlington, and Horry Counties joined the Tour in 2016, and in 2017, the Tour added Florence and Newberry Counties, bringing the total number of participating counties to eleven. Overall, the Tour has seen over 20,000 visitors since launching in 2012.

The Tour is coordinated by a leadership team and county-level planning teams that are coordinated by the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service and the Olde English District Tourism Commission. Partner organizations include economic development, chamber of commerce, tourism bureau, farm and artisan organizations, education and extension office, arts councils and community volunteers.

Support for this project is provided by York Electric Cooperative, Inc., the SC Arts Commission (which receives funding from the NEA), Rock Hill Accommodations Tax/Tourism Commission, York County Hospitality Tax, the ACYC’s Annual Campaign and Small Grants Program, and the John and Susan Bennet Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of SC.

For more information on the South Carolina Ag + Art Tour, please contact Ben Boyles at 803/981-3021 or visit (www.AgAndArtTour.com) for details. Artists and artisans seeking more information about participating in the Ag + Art Tour of York County should contact Stephanie Castaldo by e-mail at (scastaldo@yorkcountyarts.org) or call 803/328-2787.