Archive for the ‘Arts Education’ Category

Charleston Development Academy in Charleston, SC, Calls for Photographers to Teach Students – Deadline April 17, 2017

April 13, 2017

FREEDOM SCHOOL in Charleston, SC, will have a summer program for 50 youth in the 5th and 6th grades, and 10 of these students will be taking a photography program. We need mentor volunteers to work with these kids, one hour a week on Mondays, from June 19 to July 28. They will be shooting in their community in downtown Charleston and need your mentoring.

The school will be at the Charleston Development Academy on Meeting Street, across the from the Visitors’ Center. The program will be similar to the previous Kids with Camera program.

If you are potentially interesting, we need to know by Monday, April 17. I should have more details soon.

Drop me an e-mail at (ronroczphoto@gmail.com).

Share your interest in photography with disadvantaged youngsters. It’s fun for you and impactful on the kids.

Thanks.  Ron Rocz

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Celebrates Traditional Arts Program for Students

March 30, 2017

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is celebrating the work of the ten budding potters who participated in the spring 2017 session of the Center’s Traditional Arts Program for Students (TAPS). TAPS is an afterschool pottery class hosted by the NC Pottery Center in partnership with Seagrove Elementary School and sponsored by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources. Each fall and spring, ten fifth grade students from nearby Seagrove Elementary School are invited to participate in the program, and learn pottery local history and skills.

Chad Brown with student

The TAPS program aims to connect North Carolina students with local traditional artists. Students receive instruction in an art form that has deep cultural roots in their community, taught by experts utilizing traditional techniques. Students learn numerous clay processes, including wheel-throwing, hand-building, glazing and firing of pottery forms drawn from traditional use and practice.  Seagrove potter Sid Luck, winner of the 2014 North Carolina Heritage Award, leads the class. Luck is assisted by Seagrove potters Chad Brown and Susan Greene, NCPC Artists-in-Residence Owen Laurion and Kirsten Olson, and NCPC educational program manager, Emily Lassiter.

“The North Carolina Pottery Center’s TAPS program is so fortunate to have fifth-generation potter Sid Luck teaching Seagrove pottery traditions to the community’s young people,” says Sally Peterson, Folklife Director at the NC Arts Council. “A career public school teacher himself, Sid combines high level teaching skills with time-honored pottery knowledge to present an enriching program that connects students to the very heart of their community. Rising fifth-generation potter Chad Brown and others contribute an energy and creativity to the program that would be difficult to match anywhere outside of a university program.  I love visiting the TAPS program, because the students are so enthusiastic and really perform way beyond expectation,” says Peterson.

The spring 2017 TAPS session will end Wednesday, Apr. 5, 2017.  To celebrate our students’ hard work, a reception and exhibition of TAPS students’ pottery is planned for that day, from 2:45 until 4pm in the education building. The general public is invited to attend.

For more information, please call 336/873.8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Kirsten Olsen for Clay Talks – Apr. 6, 2017

March 30, 2017

Join us at the on April 6th for a presentation by Kirsten Olson, currently an Artist-in-Residence at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, for Clay Talks.

A graduate of Juniata College in Huntington, PA with a BA in Anthropology, Minor Fine Arts and an MFA Ceramics from University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Olsen most recently served as Ceramics Adjunct Faculty and Ceramic Studio Technician at the Art Department of Juniata College. She has been an Artist-in-Residence at the Pottery Center since Oct. 2016. She was named one of American Craft Week’s 2016 “Rising Stars; 30 Exceptional Crafts People under the age of 30” and most recently announced as a finalist in “Functional Ceramics” for the 2017 NICHE Awards.

Olsen says, “My inspiration as a ceramic artist is strongly grounded in anthropology, particularly cultural customs, ceremonies, and rituals. My ceramic vessels not only contain the food and drink that nourish, but also contain the ideas of culture and community.” Highly inspired by Alaskan culture and the North, her work recalls the shapes of baskets, hats, mukluk patterns, and ivory objects while the glaze and kiln firing process also reflect textures associated with natural materials, such as bone, ivory, and wood.

Olsen’s talk will address her background in clay and anthropology, as well as recent endeavors at the Pottery Center. A potluck at 6pm will begin the evening’s events, followed by the slide talk at 7pm. Come out for a great night of food and community!

Location: The NCPC Educational Building located behind the NC Pottery Center at 233 East Avenue, Seagrove, 27341.

This presentation is free and open to the public.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation, and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you! The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

For more information, call the center at 336/873-8430. This ongoing lecture series is facilitated by Emily Lassiter, NCPC Educational Program Manager.

Lancaster County Council of the Arts in Lancaster, SC, Calls for Instructors

March 30, 2017

The Lancaster County Council of the Arts in Lancaster, SC, is looking for​ certified teachers​ and instructors and arts professionals for our summer Arts & Sciences Summer Camps from July 10 to Aug. 4, 2017.​​ Morning camps are 3-hour, week-long sessions for 4 consecutive weeks​, beginning July 10 for K-6 children​.​ Camp weeks: July 10 – Lancaster at Covenant Baptist Church;​​​ July 17 – Buford at Tabernacle United Methodist Church; July 24 – Kershaw at First Baptist Church – Kershaw; July 31 – Indian Land at Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church. ​

For the proposal form or more information, please visit (http:///www.lccarts.net) or e-mail to (arts.takepart@gmail.com) or contact the Lancaster County Council of the Arts at 803/285-7451. ​​

The Johnson Collection in Spartanburg, SC, Offers Lecture by Metropolitan Museum Curator, Sylvia Yount – Mar. 15, 2017

March 7, 2017

Before ascending to one of the most coveted curatorial jobs in New York, Sylvia Yount spent years working in the South, where she developed a deep appreciation for the region’s culture. As the keynote speaker for the fourth annual installment of Voices in American Art, Dr. Yount, who now serves as the first female curator of the Metropolitan Museum’s iconic American Wing, will deliver a lecture that connects her Southern experiences and her achievements as a pioneering female professional with a recurring theme in her scholarship: art created by women.

Her presentation, “A Region of Their Own: Southern Women Artists,” is the centerpiece of the popular yearly symposium sponsored by the Johnson Collection. Open to the public at no charge, the event will take place at Chapman Cultural Center on Mar. 15, 2017, at 7pm. No reservations or tickets are required.

Sylvia Yount became the Lawrence A. Fleischman Curator in Charge of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in September 2014. She is responsible for the administrative oversight of the Wing, with its ten curators and twenty-five other staff and volunteers. She also provides vision and leadership, while defining collecting, interpretation, and audience-engagement goals for the historic department of fine and decorative arts from the colonial period to the early-twentieth century. Before moving to the Met, she spent seven years as Chief Curator and the Louise B. and J. Harwood Cochrane Curator of American Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and six as the Margaret and Terry Stent Curator of American Art and department head at the High Museum of Art. She began her curatorial career at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, America’s oldest art school and museum, in 1993.

In addition to completing pivotal collection reinstallations at her former institutions, Yount has organized major exhibitions (with accompanying catalogues) on Cecilia Beaux, Maxfield Parrish, and American modernism, among other topics. She received a Ph.D. and a M.A. in the History of Art from the University of Pennsylvania, and a B.A. in Italian from New York University. Yount has lectured and published widely on late nineteenth and twentieth century American art and culture as well as on issues of curatorial responsibility and current museum practice.

Created in support of the Johnson Collection’s mission to increase understanding of the dynamic role that art of the South plays in the larger context of our national history, Voices in American Art brings arts professionals from across the country to Spartanburg for annual symposiums that engage the cultural and college communities. Previous VIAA speakers include Jane Panetta, Associate Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art; Jan Postma, Chief Financial Officer of the Museum of Modern Art; Elizabeth Pochoda, former editor of “The Magazine Antiques”; and Sarah Cash, Associate Curator of American and British paintings at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Hailed by “The Magazine Antiques” with staging a “quiet art historical revolution” and expanding “the meaning of regional,” the Johnson Collection offers an extensive survey of artistic activity in the American South from the late eighteenth century to the present day. In May 2016, the Spartanburg-based collection received the Governor’s Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award for the Arts, South Carolina’s highest honor in the field.

For more information, please visit (www.thejohnsoncollection.org).

Southern Highland Craft Guild Offers Arts Education at the Folk Art Center in Asheville, NC – Apr. 1, 2017

March 7, 2017

Makers of the Southern Highland Craft Guild are preparing for the launch of their 2017 special event programming at the Folk Art Center in Asheville, NC, with the second annual Glass and Metal Day. On Saturday, Apr. 1, 2017, nearly fifteen Guild members will showcase their skills and techniques of glass and metal in the auditorium of the Center. From 10am to 4pm, these masters will be blacksmithing, glass blowing, piercing and soldering metals, knife making, bezeling, repoussé, copper etching, assembling stained glass, forging and many other manipulation processes. As a non-profit organization, the Guild provides experiential learning opportunities for the public to cultivate awareness of both handmade and craft.


Michael Hatch in his furnace in Weaverville working on a vase. Photo by Sarah Carballo.

Long-time member Blenko Glass Company will be participating this year with special appearance of Walter Blenko himself, current President of the company. The founder’s grandson will be located in the Folk Art Center’s lobby at the entrance of the auditorium to sign pieces made from Blenko. Patrons and customers are invited to bring their pieces from home to have him etch the glass from 10-4pm. Located in Milton, West Virginia, Blenko Glass Company has been in business since 1893.

Member Ruthie Cohen will be one of several jewelers working with precious metals as she bezels and forges them into fine adornments. Cohen is an advocate of craft education as teaches at her Mountain Metalsmiths School of Jewelry & Lapidary in Arden.


Jewelry by Erica Stankwych Bailey. She uses various techniques to forge unique collections for all.

Visitors will have the opportunity to watch and learn more about two of the original craft media. Glassblower Michael Hatch of Crucible Glassworks will be using a small kiln to exhibit the quick thought process of blown glass. While Laurie Young and Christian Arnold of Australian Art Glass will demonstrate fusing and torching glass into ornate, decorative pieces.

The Guild’s education series of events are a significant channel that members use to explain their creative process. Providing craft consumers with knowledge and the story behind their investment is an equally important part of the Guild’s mission to the buying public.

For a complete list of artists participating in Glass & Metal Day, and to learn more about Southern Highland Craft Guild programs at the Folk Art Center call 828/298-7928 or visit (www.craftguild.org).

Admission to Glass & Metal Day and the Folk Art Center is free. The Folk Art Center is located at Milepost 382 on the Blue Ridge Parkway in east Asheville. Headquarters to the Southern Highland Craft Guild, the Center also houses three galleries, a library, a craft shop and a Blue Ridge Parkway information desk and bookstore.

The Southern Highland Craft Guild is a non-profit, educational organization established in 1930 to cultivate the crafts and makers of the Southern Highlands for the purpose of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation. The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior. The Folk Art Center is located at Milepost 382 of the Blue Ridge Parkway, just north of the Highway 70 entrance in east Asheville, NC.

Glass & Metal Day 2017, demonstrating artists include:

Erica Bailey, jewelry
Amy Brandenburg, jewelry
Ruthie Cohen & David Alberts, jewelry
Rachelle Davis, jewelry
Michael Hatch, glass blowing
Cecile Keith, metalsmithing
Greg Magruder, stained glass
Jay Pfeil, copper etching
Lyle Wheeler, blacksmithing
Christian Arnold, blown glass
Laurie Young, blown glass
Cheryl Stippich, stained glass
Blenko Glass, glass signing

Inside/Out Brings Art to Area Neighborhoods in Charlotte, NC

February 28, 2017

Imagine encountering Andy Warhol’s “Marilyn” outside a YMCA or emerging artist Jordan Casteel’s “Kevin The Kite Man” in the middle of a park. Charlotteans will be able to participate in this experience beginning in April when the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art and the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture, in Charlotte, NC, launch Inside/Out Charlotte. The Inside/Out Charlotte initiative is a part of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation’s national effort to share collections and bring art into communities.

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This public exhibition and outreach program will reach into the greater Charlotte-Mecklenburg area to strengthen knowledge, understanding and appreciation for visual art. The program places framed, high-quality reproductions of artworks on display at the Bechtler Museum and Gantt Center for community members to encounter and enjoy programming specifically designed for each installation. Inside/Out Charlotte will launch in the spring highlighting artworks that reflect the diversity of the museums’ collections and broad interests in the communities.

The program started eight years ago at the Detroit Institute of Arts and now includes partners around the nation; the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Akron Art Museum, and Perez Art Museum Miami. The Knight Foundation has funded the expansion to additional cities including Charlotte.

“There’s something very powerful about seeing works of art in person. You become completely immersed. Inside/Out brings that experience to people, directly in their communities, and an amazing thing happens: entire neighborhoods, entire communities, start to talk about art,” said Victoria Rogers, vice president for arts at Knight Foundation.

Residents, families and friends in the participating communities will be able to walk through the park or hop on a bike and encounter art in unexpected places and enjoy each exciting outdoor exhibition. The Bechtler and the Gantt Center, in conjunction with the partner communities, will plan educational opportunities and other fun activities, such as bicycle and walking tours, community discussions, musical performances and more.

Inside/Out Charlotte is now in the process of asking city and community representatives, development authorities and arts organizations interested in being part of the museums’ new program. Communities can choose one of two exhibition periods: spring, from April to July, or fall, from September to December. Selected communities will have the opportunity to host five to eight reproductions within walking or bike-riding distance from each other. In all, up to 60 reproduced artworks will be on display around Charlotte in the spring and an additional 80 works in the fall.

Communities and businesses that take part will be promoted through the Inside/Out Charlotte website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and more. The museum installs the reproductions and can assist community leaders in developing educational programs that engage people and inspire them to visit the Bechtler and the Gantt Center. To learn more, visit the Inside/Out Charlotte website at (InsideOutCLT.org).

The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture presents, preserves and celebrates excellence in the art, history and culture of African-Americans and those of African descent. The Center is located at Levine Center for the Arts 551 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28202. Operating hours are Sun., from 1-5pm; Monday: Closed, Tue.-Sat., from 10am-5pm.

The Bechtler Museum of Modern Art is dedicated to the exhibition of mid-20th-century modern art. It is named after the family of Andreas Bechtler who assembled and inherited a collection created by seminal figures of modernism. The museum is located at Levine Center for the Arts, 420 South Tryon Street, Charlotte 28202. Operating hours are Mon., Wed., Thur., Fri, and Sat., 10am-5pm; Sun., noon-5pm; and closed Tue.

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is a national foundation with strong local roots. We invest in journalism, in the arts, and in the success of cities where brothers John S. and James L. Knight once published newspapers. Our goal is to foster informed and engaged communities, which we believe are essential for a healthy democracy.”

For further information contact Sharon Holm, Bechtler Museum of Modern Art Director of Marketing and Communications, by e-mail at (sharon.holm@bechtler.org) or call 704/353-9204.

Appalachian Pastel Society Holds Monthly Meeting on Jan. 14, 2017, in Mills River, NC

December 30, 2016

appa-pastel-society-logo

The Appalachian Pastel Society will hold its monthly meeting on Jan. 14, 2017, from 10am-noon, at Grace Community Church in Mills River, NC.

The meeting will be a “Paint Around” with members and guests participating. We will have five easels set up in the room, each with a sketch on pastel paper. Each easel will
have a “Host Artist” who is providing a set of basic pastels for us to use. We will each take  turns painting on one easel for a few minutes then moving along to the next easel, etc. so we will collectively create five different paintings over the two hours. Should be both fun and educational.

Grace Community Church is located at 495 Cardinal Road
in Mills River, NC, 28759.

For further information contact Cathyann Burgess by calling 828/595-9518, e-mail to (cathyannburgess@gmail.com) or visit (www.appalacianpastelsociety.org).

Traditional Arts Program for Students Celebrated at NC Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC

December 6, 2016

ncpclogosmall

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is celebrating the work of the ten budding potters who participated in the fall 2016 session of the Center’s Traditional Arts Program for Students (TAPS). TAPS is an afterschool pottery class hosted by the NC Pottery Center in partnership with Seagrove Elementary School and sponsored by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources. Each fall and spring, ten fifth grade students from nearby Seagrove Elementary School are invited to participate in the program, and learn pottery local history and skills.

1216nc-pottery-center-sid-luck
North Carolina Folk Heritage Award winner Sid Luck teaches students how to make face jugs, a traditional form in Southern pottery.

The TAPS program aims to connect North Carolina students with local traditional artists. Students receive instruction in an art form that has deep cultural roots in their community, taught by experts utilizing traditional techniques. Students learn numerous clay processes, including wheel-throwing, hand-building, glazing and firing of pottery forms drawn from traditional use and practice.  Seagrove potter Sid Luck, winner of the 2014 North Carolina Heritage Award, leads the class. Luck is assisted by Seagrove potters Chad Brown and Susan Greene, NCPC Artists-in-Residence Owen Laurion and Kirsten Olson, and NCPC educational program manager, Emily Lassiter.

“The North Carolina Pottery Center’s TAPS program is so fortunate to have fifth-generation potter Sid Luck teaching Seagrove pottery traditions to the community’s young people,” says Sally Peterson, Folklife Director at the NC Arts Council.  “A career public school teacher himself, Sid combines high level teaching skills with time-honored pottery knowledge to present an enriching program that connects students to the very heart of their community.  Rising fifth-generation potter Chad Brown and others contribute an energy and creativity to the program that would be difficult to match anywhere outside of a university program.  I love visiting the TAPS program, because the students are so enthusiastic and really perform way beyond expectation,” says Peterson.

The fall 2016 TAPS session will end Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016.  To celebrate our students’ hard work, a reception and exhibition of TAPS students’ pottery is planned for that day, from 2:45 until 4pm. The general public is invited to attend.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the John W. & Anna H. Hanes Foundation, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., from 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

Art League of Hendersonville County in Hendersonville, NC, Offers Amy Perrier for Monthly Meeting – Sept. 11, 2016

August 31, 2016

art-league-of-henderson-county-logo

Most of us left finger painting behind long ago, but Amy Perrier has taken that art form to new heights. She not only revels in it, but she’s become a pro at it. The Art League of Hendersonville County is eager to host a presentation of her techniques at their upcoming meeting on Sept. 11, 2016, at Opportunity House, 1411 Asheville Highway, Hendersonville, NC.

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Amy Perrier

Perrier is delightfully vocal about her distinctive way of creating her art as it allows her to bring out lots of color and energy. In fact when you watch her create her paintings, her abounding exuberance is evident. She describes her style this way…. “When I had a brush in my hand, the instinct was to paint every detail. The finger painting has both liberated and challenged me to find a way to tell the story with color and texture…”

She begins her process by staining the canvas with several layers of color. She is quite a gifted and amusing presenter, and she becomes more animated as the presentation progresses. Then comes the fun part, as she starts to finger paint more and more layers of color on her surface, as her fingers begin to dance across the canvas.  In what seems like magic, forms begin to appear from what a few minutes before seemed to be shapeless blobs of paint. She says that she begins with an idea in mind, but like all experienced  artists, she says that she is “prepared to go in the direction my applications are taking me.”

The Art League is composed of members of many media and skill sets. It allows for exchange of ideas and finding out about exhibition opportunities and sources for supplies. The Art League of Henderson County, NC, is open to all who are interested in fine art. The organization meets monthly on the second Sunday of each month (3rd Sunday in May), at Opportunity House, 1411 Asheville Highway, Hendersonville, NC. (There is ample on-site parking which is handicapped accessible.) The social time begins at 1:30pm, with a short business meeting beginning at 2pm. An art related presentation then follows until 4pm. Guests are welcome.

For further info e-mail to (sharoncarlyle@beverly-hanks.com) or call 828/551-1478.