Archive for the ‘Arts Funding’ Category

Southern Prize and State Fellowships Application Open for Visual Artists – Deadline is Dec. 15, 2017

November 12, 2017

For the second year in a row, South Arts, based in Atlanta, GA, is accepting entries for the Southern Prize and State Fellowships, offering nine individual artists cash awards up to $30,000; the contest is open to artists living in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. One fellowship with a cash prize of $5,000 will be awarded to an individual artist in each state. The state fellows will then be in competition for the Southern Prize of an additional $25,000 and a finalist prize of $10,000. The Southern Prize winner also receives a two-week residency at The Hambidge Center for Creative Arts and Sciences.

“Artists in our region are producing some of the most creative work in our country,” said Susie Surkamer, executive director of South Arts. “From traditional quilting to bleeding-edge 3D printing sculptures to dynamic installations driving conversations on social justice, southern artists are creating important, extraordinary works.”

Artists may apply for the Southern Prize until Dec. 15, 2017, through South Arts’ website at (www.southarts.org). Artists specializing in crafts, drawing, experimental, painting, photography, sculpture, mixed media, and multidisciplinary styles are eligible.

“The Southern Prize and State Fellowships impact the careers and lives of artists in our region,” continued Surkamer. “Previous winners have used their awards to purchase materials to create new work, enroll in residency programs, and secure studio space. The funds are unrestricted, so the winning artists can spend the awards on whatever they may need.”

A panel of national judges will adjudicate submissions, and the state fellowships will be awarded at a ceremony which will be held at the Contemporary Arts Center in New Orleans, LA, in April 2018.

The Southern Prize is supported by South Arts’ member state arts agencies, foundation, businesses, and individuals, and powered by The Hambidge Center. South Arts also receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

South Arts, a nonprofit regional arts organization, was founded in 1975 to build on the South’s unique heritage and enhance the public value of the arts. South Arts’ work responds to the arts environment and cultural trends with a regional perspective. South Arts offers an annual portfolio of activities designed to address the role of the arts in impacting the issues important to our region, and to link the South with the nation and the world through the arts.

For more information, visit (www.southarts.org).

Editor’s Note: at the time of posting this the website link was not working.

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CERF + Comes to the Rescue in Texas

September 28, 2017

Have you seen the ad for CERF+ The Artists Safety Net which we include in every issue of “Carolina Arts”? We put it there because they are the folks who held artists recover from disasters. I first head of them 28 years ago when Hurricane Hugo hit Charleston, SC, and many artists were helped by CERF, now they are CERF+. I also know of potters in Seagrove, NC, who received help from CERF when a fire burned down their clay studio. It’s a good organization. They can’t make a disaster go away over night, but they can help artists get back on their feet and on the road to recovery – with the help of other artists and good people who donate funds to help out.

Here’s a recent story about an artist who is on the road to recovery after Hurricane Harvey came to call on Texas.


Owner + Artist of Port A Glass Studio & Gallery, Sheri Hargrove, Port Aransas, Texas

Glass artist Sheri Hargrove has called the beautiful Texas island of Port Aransas her home for more than 12 years. Her shop, Port A Glass (http://portaglass.com/), has become a well known fixture in downtown Port “A”. Friends describe Hargrove as “an incredibly generous human being who would never ask for assistance – instead, she would be the first to give it.” It turns out that Hargrove herself would need help when disaster struck this September.

When Hurricane Harvey rolled in, Hargrove’s shop and studio were directly in the line of the storm’s landfall. Her home and business were destroyed all at once with severe damage after a storm surge of 5 feet of storm caused devastating flooding. Hargrove had business insurance, but it didn’t cover flood damage and loss due to the area in which her business is located.

When Hargrove returned home after evacuating to friends in San Antonio, her home had no walls or ceiling. While her artwork mostly survived, she lost all of her equipment including: three kilns, three saws, a compressor and two drill presses, along with her gallery and teaching space located in her studio-garage. For now, Port A Glass is temporarily closed and the road to recovery will be laborious and expensive. “Port A Glass is going to rebuild,” Hargrove explains. “It’s just going to take some time and money.”

“I was devastated and left without a path forward. Through the help of the beautiful people at CERF+ and the Art Glass community, I’m now able to see a light at the end of a very long tunnel. CERF+ has been like Harvey’s angels to me,” says Hargrove.

CERF+ and the glass art community have been among the first to provide help. Her local community and friends started a gofundme fundraiser (https://www.gofundme.com/sherihargrove) and manufacturers of glass equipment are stepping up to help as well with donated materials and discounts on supplies.

For Hargrove, “The trauma of Hurricane Harvey comes in waves.” She’s constantly reminded that the recovery and rebuilding process is a marathon and not a sprint. “I’ve been brought to tears of joy so many times throughout this ordeal by the beautiful, giving, loving spirit of my fellow Americans. I’m looking forward to the day when I can turn all of my energy back into my artwork. It’s only because of the kindness of friends, colleagues, and strangers that I am able to think of the future.”

CERF+ is located at 535 Stone Cutters Way, Ste. 202,
Montpelier, VT 05602
You can contact them by calling 802/229-2306 or visit their website at (https://cerfplus.org/).

If you need help contact them. If you can provide help to others contact them.

Get Your Free Tickets Now for “Smithsonian” Magazine’s Museum Day Live! Taking Place Sept. 23, 2017

August 30, 2017

Beginning today, museum-goers can head to the Museum Day Live! website to download one free ticket, good for two people, for “Smithsonian” magazine’s 13th annual Museum Day Live!. Each ticket grants the ticketholder, and one guest, free access to any participating museum on Sept. 23, 2017. One ticket is permitted per e-mail address.

This year, Museum Day Live! is partnering with Microsoft to create special interactive lesson plans using Minecraft: Education Edition. Participating museums can download the lesson plans to enhance the Museum Day Live! experience at their facility. The Minecraft: Education Edition extensions are based on Smithsonian materials and are available on the Museum Day Live! website. Following the event, Microsoft will provide schools with access to the Minecraft: Education Edition extensions.

To register, see the full list of museums, and download a free ticket please visit: (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumdaylive).

Smithsonian Media is comprised of its flagship publication, “Smithsonian” magazine, “Air & Space” magazine, Smithsonian Books, and the Smithsonian Media Digital Network. In addition, Smithsonian Media oversees the Smithsonian Institution’s interest in the Smithsonian Channel, a joint venture between the Smithsonian Institution and CBS/Showtime. Smithsonian Media is a division of Smithsonian Enterprises, the revenue-generating business unit of the Smithsonian Institution. The Smithsonian Institution is the world’s largest museum and research complex consisting of 20 museums and galleries, the National Zoological Park, and nine research facilities. Approximately 30 million people from around the world visit the museums annually. (smithsonian.com/si.edu)

South Carolina Watermedia Society Seeks Donations for SCWS First National Digital Show

July 7, 2017


Would you consider making a tax deductible donation to help provide awards for the top 30 paintings in the SCWS first National Digital Show. Donations can be made in honor of an individual or a group. Donors and sponsors will be listed in the show catalog.

This year’s show is from October 7 through November 25, 2017, in Charleston, SC, at the Charleston International Airport, in the front atrium.

All of those donating receive promotions in the media and in our catalog which is circulated statewide with a traveling exhibit. In addition, advertisements may be placed in the catalog to provide general program support and artist awards.

Click here to make your contribution (https://scwatermedia.com/sponsorships/).

Click here to learn more about the digital show (https://www.callforentry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=4437). Entry deadline for the show is July 28, 2017.

2017 Piccolo Spoleto Crafts Shows in Charleston, SC, Announces Show Award Winners

June 19, 2017

For three weeks every year beginning on Memorial Day weekend, downtown Charleston, South Carolina becomes an arts mecca with two major arts festivals running concurrently. The Spoleto Festival USA, is an arts festival with over 150 performances, and the companion Piccolo Spoleto Festival features over 500 events in the preforming, visual and literary arts. Combined, the events bring over 250,000 arts enthusiasts into the downtown Charleston area.

Fine Craft Shows Charleston proudly presents the Piccolo Spoleto Craft Shows for 2017. These three-day shows represent our 38th year participating as a part of the Piccolo Spoleto Festival. We strive to provide festival attendees with an overview of the high quality of original works currently being created in a variety of craft media. Approximately 120 fine crafts artists from around the US participate in the one or both of the shows, which are held on the first two weekends of the festival. Both emerging and experienced craft artists are invited to apply to participate. Artist demonstrations – both scheduled and impromptu – are a highlight for show patrons.

The first weekend of the Piccolo Spoleto Crafts Show had fine weather on Friday, May 24, 2017, for the judging and awards presentation. The judge for the show was Casimer Kowalski, a local visual artist. Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg and his wife Sandy presented the awards. Photos courtesy of Sea Star Arts Photography.

Best in Show: Jean Yao a basketmaker from Ft. Lauderdale, FL.


Mayor John Tecklenburg, Best in Show winner Jean Yao and Sandy Tecklenburg

First Place: Addelle Sanders, a fiber artist from Charleston, SC.

Second Place: Doug Richard, a wood turner from Satsuma, FL.

Third Place: Christie May, a jeweler from Palm Beach, FL.

Honorable Mentions:

Nancy Michael Susaneck, a mixed media artist from Missouri City, TX.

Caleb Barnaby, a jeweler from Ormond Beach, FL.

Emerging Artist Grant: Alexander Bower, a jeweler from Charlottesville, VA.

Exhibitors’ Choice Award: Wilson Lee, a wood carver from Nashville, TN

Purchase awards:

Charles and Cindy Cecil, jewelers from High Point, NC.
Susan Marling, a fiber artist from Acworth, GA.
Tammy Rudd, a jeweler from Holly Hill, SC.
David Shipper, a photographer from Beaufort, SC.

The second weekend of the Piccolo Spoleto Crafts show began on June 2, 2017, another beautiful day. The judge for this show was Michael W. Haga, Associate Dean at the College of Charleston School of the Arts.

Best in Show: Tammy Rudd, a glass beadmaker and jeweler from Holly Hill, SC.


Show Judge Michael Haga and Best in Show winner Tammy Rudd. Inset a glass pendant

First Place: Colleen Williams, potter from Chattanooga, TN

Second Place: JoAnn Graham, a jeweler from St Helena, SC.

Third place: Susan Marling, a fiber artist from Acworth, GA.

Honorable Mentions:

Ed Bryan, a potter from Columbia, SC.

Jen Swearington, a fiber artist from Asheville, NC.

Exhibitor’s Choice Award: Matt and Katie Wilson, metalworkers from North Charleston, SC.

Emerging Artist Grant: Joe Hiltabitel and Shelly Simmons, photographers from Travelers Rest, SC.

Slide Jurors’ Choice: Nancy Michael Susanneck a mixed media artist from Missouri City, TX.

Purchase Awards:

Uzo Ezekwudo and Nnamdi Ibenagu, fiber artists from Chapel Hill, NC.
Tom Homann, a potter from Comer, GA.
Jiri Kalina, a wood carver from Wilmington, NC.
Cynthia McFadden, a mixed media Jeweler from Charleston, SC.

For further information call Kasey Briggs at 843/364-0421 or e-mail to (piccolo@finecraftshowscharleston.com).

 

The Columbia Museum of Art in Columbia, SC, Reduces Admission Prices During Renovations

June 12, 2017

The Columbia Museum of Art in Columbia, SC, announces specially reduced admission pricing for the duration of building renovations, scheduled for completion in the fall of 2018. Museumgoers gain entry for half the regular amount: Adults are now $6, seniors and military $5, and students $2.50. Children six years old and under remain free.

This initiative is partially funded through the Karen Brosius National Medal Fund, established last year to honor Karen Brosius, who served as CMA executive director from 2004 – 2016. The fund benefits CMA programs, exhibitions, and opportunities with dynamic approaches to public service.

“In the years I worked with Karen, I saw firsthand her passion for arts accessibility,” says R. Scott McClelland, president of the CMA board of trustees. “She was a driving force behind our National Medal win and the fact that a third of our programs are free. We thought this was a great chance to honor her dedication and service in a way that benefits our community.”

The onset of reduced admission pricing coincided with the opening of the summer exhibition “ReTooled: Highlights of the Hechinger Collection”, on view Friday, June 2, through Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017.

“The museum is staying active during renovations, and we want to make it that much easier for people to participate in our full schedule of exhibitions and programs,” says Lynn Robertson, CMA interim director. “Beyond the hammers and drills, we still have plenty to see and do.”

For more information, visit (www.columbiamuseum.org).

The Columbia Museum of Art is a charitable nonprofit organization dedicated to lifelong learning and community enrichment for all. Located in the heart of downtown Columbia, the CMA ranks among the leading art institutions in the country and is distinguished by its innovative exhibitions and creative educational programs. At the heart of the CMA and its programs is its collection, which encompasses 7,000 works and spans 5,000 years of art history. Established in 1950, the CMA now welcomes more than 150,000 visitors annually and is a catalyst for community creativity and education, engaging people of all ages and backgrounds. It is the recipient of a National Medal from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, a National Art Education Association award for its contributions to arts education, a National Park Foundation Award, and two Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Awards for the Arts for outstanding contributions to the arts in South Carolina. To learn more, visit (www.columbiamuseum.org).

Hub City Empty Bowls in Spartanburg, SC, Launches 2017 Program

May 31, 2017

Hub City Empty Bowls – an annual fundraiser that uses handmade pottery bowls to feed hungry Spartanburg citizens – has set the 2017 dates for its well-attended events. There will be three regularly scheduled bowl-making events: Saturday, July 15, 2017, at 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s pottery studio at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC; Thursday, July 20, 2017, from 5-8pm at West Main Artists Co-Op, during ArtWalk; and Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017, at 10am-noon and 1-3pm at Chapman Cultural Center. Soup Day will be Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017, from 11am-4pm at Chapman Cultural Center. All events are free and family friendly.

Hub City Empty Bowls is a localized fundraiser inspired the international Empty Bowls decentralized program. Locally, the program’s spearhead Carolina Clay Artists coordinates public bowl-making sessions. At no charge, citizens of all ages are given supplies, tools, space, and instructions on how to make hand-shaped pottery bowls. Those unfinished bowls are left at the venue to be painted and fired by experienced potters. Bowls often made by children can be simple, primitive, and charming. Others made by experienced potters can be precise, intricate, and sophisticated.

With hundreds of bowls created by local citizens, Carolina Clay Artists then hosts Soup Day, an event where patrons receive the bowls – each for a $15 donation to TOTAL Ministries, a local charity that provides food and other resources to people in financial crisis. In addition to receiving bowls, the patrons can enjoy a meal of soup, bread, and tea donated by the community’s leading restaurants, hear live music, bid in a silent auction, and enjoy the fellowship and comradery of knowing they are helping to feed people in need. In 2016, the Carolina Clay Artists donated a record-breaking $33,000 to TOTAL Ministries.

“Coordinating Hub City Empty Bowls is a massive undertaking,” 2017 Chairman Bruce Bowyer said. “People want to know as soon as possible about our dates so they can plan accordingly. Some people come to all of the bowl-making sessions and Soup Day. Plus, by setting the dates early, we can better handle the large crowds of people who normally show up. It is not unusual for us to have several hundred people come to a bowl-making session. And come Soup Day, we’ll see more than a thousand.”

Despite the crowds, it is seldom anyone has to wait to make a bowl or enjoy Soup Day. Space, volunteers, and experience are plentiful enough to keep everyone engaged.

Carolina Clay Artists is a local group of hobbyist and professional potters who come together monthly to share ideas, hold workshops and demos, and tour pottery studios to see other artists’ work and learn new ideas. It is open to all who have an interest in learning and sharing about pottery. Annual dues are $35. Hub City Empty Bowls is the group’s annual charity fundraising event to help feed the hungry.

TOTAL Ministries got its start in 1982 as Project Eat. Founder Dannie Horne saw an unemployment rate of 9.7% and that many people in Spartanburg County were hungry. During the first 17 months of Project Eat’s existence, $190,000 of groceries were distributed in an effort to alleviate that problem. In 1983, TOTAL Ministries of Spartanburg County, Inc. was incorporated by 12 Spartanburg churches to carry on the work of Project Eat. Since then, additional emergency services have been added to the TOTAL mission in an effort to help those in need. For those in need, TOTAL can help with utility services, food, and medications.

Empty Bowls started in 1990 by Michigan art teacher John Hartom, who organized a charitable event to give his art students a way to make a personal difference in the lives of others in their community. Hartom’s students made pottery bowls in their high school art classes, and the finished products were then used as individual serving pieces for a fundraising meal of soup and bread. From that simple beginning, Empty Bowls has spread around the world, taking root in communities both small and large. Spartanburg had its first Empty Bowls program in 2009. All Empty Bowls efforts are locally based with all proceeds going to a local charity with a mission to alleviate hunger in its community. None of the money raised leaves the community. The lead agency, Carolina Clay Artists, donates all of its time and talents, and receives no monetary benefit. Locally, all proceeds go to TOTAL Ministries.

For more information about Hub City Empty Bowls, please visit online at (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com) or call 864.706-3739 or 864/585-9167.

Crooked Creek Art League in Chapin, SC, Receives Grant from SC Arts Commission

May 31, 2017

The Crooked Creek Art League (CCAL) in Chapin, SC, has been awarded a grant by the South Carolina Arts Commission for the 2017 fiscal year. The support is a grant that will help with annual operating expense which will encompass not only monthly general membership meetings which include refreshments and 1 ½ hour arts education program but also helped CCAL conduct its “22nd annual Juried Art Show”. The annual juried show took place Mar. 20, 2017. The show highlighted over 100 pieces of art that were displayed at Crooked Creek Park. The show recognized 20 pieces of art with $2000 awarded in prizes.

The South Carolina Arts Commission grant will enable CCAL to more fully achieve our mission of encouragement and support of new and established artist, to offer outlets to improve skills, display and sell art, and allow artist and art supporters to socialize and network.

The South Carolina Arts Commission is the state agency charged with creating a thriving arts environment that benefits all South Carolinians, regardless of their location or circumstance. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission is working to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas: art education , community arts development and artist development. Headquartered in Columbia, SC, the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina and by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts. For more information visit (www.SouthCarolinaArts.com) or call 803/734-8696.

CCAL encourages persons with art backgrounds or just a general interest in the arts to attend our monthly general membership meetings or visit us at (www.crookedcreekart.org).

Congratulations to the winners of the “22nd annual Juried Art Show” for Crooked Creek Art League reception was given Mar. 20, 2017 at Crooked Creek Park Chapin SC.

Winners included: Sandra Oliver, Roger Buenzow, Karen Larrabee, Dan Frick, Randy Spencer, Anna Kay Singley, Ann Hightower Wright, Stephanie Arnold, Ron Weathers, Al Leitch, Richard Robertson. Barbara Teusink, Raja Londhe, Ingrid Carson, Shin Wilbanks, Jean Kirkley, Ruby DeLoach and Tommy Thompson.

The Arts Council of Wilmington/New Hanover County in Wilmington, NC, Calls for Applications for Grassroots Arts Program Grant

May 31, 2017

Since 1977, the North Carolina Arts Council’s Grassroots Arts Program has provided North Carolina citizens access to quality arts experiences. The program distributes funds for the arts in all 100 counties of the state primarily through partnerships with local arts councils. The Arts Council of Wilmington/New Hanover County serves as the NC Arts Council’s Designated County Partner in awarding subgrants in New Hanover County.

For complete info visit (http://artscouncilofwilmington.org/?page_id=3401).

For other info call the council at 910/343-0998 or e-mail to (info@artscouncilof wilmington.org).

GreenHill in Greensboro, NC, Receives $21,500 from Lincoln Financial Foundation

March 30, 2017

GreenHill in Greensboro, NC, has been awarded $21,500 from Lincoln Financial Foundation. With this support, GreenHill will continue to offer free Group Visits for underserved children, workshops for parents and caregivers and expand our curriculum to better accommodate special needs children and adults.

Since 2011, GreenHill has served 18,000 individuals through the support of Lincoln Financial Foundation. Research shows that sustained participation in the arts is of significant benefit to learners. A seminal longitudinal study examining the importance of sustained arts in the development of children demonstrated that intensive involvement in the arts was associated with higher levels of achievement, college attainment, and prosocial behavior.

The free Group Visits will serve programs affiliated with Guilford Child Development, United Way of Greater Greensboro’s Thriving at Three sites, Parents as Teachers, Title I schools, the Greensboro Area Autism Society of North Carolina and other organizations working with underserved populations. Through a two part tour, participants visit The Gallery to view the most current exhibition and create art in the ArtQuest Studios. During Group Visits learning outcomes target visual literacy by teaching strategies for looking at and discussing works of art, strengthening fine motor skills, fostering social and emotional development and strengthening higher level cognitive skills such as critical thinking. In order to solicit parental involvement, GreenHill will facilitate parent workshops for those organizations that work directly with parents. These workshops will blend an art curriculum with the “Raising a Reader” curriculum and will be delivered at the organization’s site. New this year, GreenHill will add curriculum to accommodate children and adults with autism spectrum disorders.

Jaymie Meyer, GreenHill’s Director, Youth and Education Programs explains a new component to the program, “The main thing that is different this year is that we are partnering with groups focused on the autistic that will help us develop the curriculum designed for them. We already have these groups coming to us, but we’ve never developed something that is exactly for this population. I know there are things we need to focus on more with this population, and the specialized staff has specific ways of working with them that I would never know. For instance, many of the clients are not verbal, so the ways to communicate with them may be gestural, or through demonstrating and signaling for them. Another great thing about this program is that many of these people have been coming here for a while. When they first came to GreenHill there was a lot of trepidation, now when they come in, I see the clients rushing through the door knowing exactly where they want to go. This is so important – they are able to build confidence and have structure.”

“Most of our participants are also visiting a gallery or art studio for the first time where they are learning new art vocabulary and experimenting with new art materials. The time spent in The Gallery is designed to promote aesthetic awareness and to help participants connect the work to their own experiences,” explains Laura Way, GreenHill’s Executive Director.

GreenHill’s fall 2017 exhibition, “Two Artists, One Space”, is a perfect example of how works of art can elicit greater understanding of culture and ideas. The exhibition will feature an African American artist creating work investigating the black experience in the South, and a Peruvian American artist whose work explores the immigrant experience. “Our goal during this exhibition will be for viewers to develop a greater appreciation of how culture informs art and how their own experiences can inform the work they create,” says Way.

During the art making leg of the tour, GreenHill’s education staff guides participants through their own unique art making experience in GreenHill’s studio-based learning environment. Laura Maruzzella, GreenHill’s Art Educator + Volunteer Coordinator regularly leads the Group Visits, “We have guided art making activities that relate to the exhibition, but we also have open-ended art making activities. I think both are important for our participants in different ways. Our guided activities connect what they have heard and seen in The Gallery and reiterates language that they’ve learned. On the flip side, we have opportunities for them to do self-guided art making which is pretty unique because a lot of arts programs in schools just simply don’t allow time for that. Here children get to create on their own without being limited by instruction. When children are afforded the opportunity to create independently they tap into critical problem solving skills and avenues for self-expression that they would not otherwise discover about themselves, not to mention confidence and independence. Plus it’s fun.”

Lifelong learning through the visual arts has been at the forefront of GreenHill’s mission since its inception in 1974. Children who live at or below the poverty level have limited access to activities outside of the school setting, especially in the arts. The Education Equality Index in March 2016 reported the achievement gap between low-income children and their “more advantaged” peers is growing at a faster rate in North Carolina than in any other state in the nation, with Greensboro and Winston-Salem having larger gaps than more than 70% of major United States cities. The achievement gap, some have argued is not just a problem within the confines of formal education, but is also caused by a dearth of opportunity for low income students. Data suggests that outside experiences are just as meaningful as test scores when it comes to a child’s success later in life.

GreenHill is located at 200 North Davie Street, in the Greensboro Cultural Center.  GreenHill is the center for NC art and promotes the visual arts of North Carolina by engaging a broad community of artists, adults and children through dynamic exhibitions and educational programs while providing a platform for exploration and investment in art.

For more information visit (www.GreenHillnc.org).