Archive for the ‘Arts Funding’ Category

GreenHill in Greensboro, NC, Receives $21,500 from Lincoln Financial Foundation

March 30, 2017

GreenHill in Greensboro, NC, has been awarded $21,500 from Lincoln Financial Foundation. With this support, GreenHill will continue to offer free Group Visits for underserved children, workshops for parents and caregivers and expand our curriculum to better accommodate special needs children and adults.

Since 2011, GreenHill has served 18,000 individuals through the support of Lincoln Financial Foundation. Research shows that sustained participation in the arts is of significant benefit to learners. A seminal longitudinal study examining the importance of sustained arts in the development of children demonstrated that intensive involvement in the arts was associated with higher levels of achievement, college attainment, and prosocial behavior.

The free Group Visits will serve programs affiliated with Guilford Child Development, United Way of Greater Greensboro’s Thriving at Three sites, Parents as Teachers, Title I schools, the Greensboro Area Autism Society of North Carolina and other organizations working with underserved populations. Through a two part tour, participants visit The Gallery to view the most current exhibition and create art in the ArtQuest Studios. During Group Visits learning outcomes target visual literacy by teaching strategies for looking at and discussing works of art, strengthening fine motor skills, fostering social and emotional development and strengthening higher level cognitive skills such as critical thinking. In order to solicit parental involvement, GreenHill will facilitate parent workshops for those organizations that work directly with parents. These workshops will blend an art curriculum with the “Raising a Reader” curriculum and will be delivered at the organization’s site. New this year, GreenHill will add curriculum to accommodate children and adults with autism spectrum disorders.

Jaymie Meyer, GreenHill’s Director, Youth and Education Programs explains a new component to the program, “The main thing that is different this year is that we are partnering with groups focused on the autistic that will help us develop the curriculum designed for them. We already have these groups coming to us, but we’ve never developed something that is exactly for this population. I know there are things we need to focus on more with this population, and the specialized staff has specific ways of working with them that I would never know. For instance, many of the clients are not verbal, so the ways to communicate with them may be gestural, or through demonstrating and signaling for them. Another great thing about this program is that many of these people have been coming here for a while. When they first came to GreenHill there was a lot of trepidation, now when they come in, I see the clients rushing through the door knowing exactly where they want to go. This is so important – they are able to build confidence and have structure.”

“Most of our participants are also visiting a gallery or art studio for the first time where they are learning new art vocabulary and experimenting with new art materials. The time spent in The Gallery is designed to promote aesthetic awareness and to help participants connect the work to their own experiences,” explains Laura Way, GreenHill’s Executive Director.

GreenHill’s fall 2017 exhibition, “Two Artists, One Space”, is a perfect example of how works of art can elicit greater understanding of culture and ideas. The exhibition will feature an African American artist creating work investigating the black experience in the South, and a Peruvian American artist whose work explores the immigrant experience. “Our goal during this exhibition will be for viewers to develop a greater appreciation of how culture informs art and how their own experiences can inform the work they create,” says Way.

During the art making leg of the tour, GreenHill’s education staff guides participants through their own unique art making experience in GreenHill’s studio-based learning environment. Laura Maruzzella, GreenHill’s Art Educator + Volunteer Coordinator regularly leads the Group Visits, “We have guided art making activities that relate to the exhibition, but we also have open-ended art making activities. I think both are important for our participants in different ways. Our guided activities connect what they have heard and seen in The Gallery and reiterates language that they’ve learned. On the flip side, we have opportunities for them to do self-guided art making which is pretty unique because a lot of arts programs in schools just simply don’t allow time for that. Here children get to create on their own without being limited by instruction. When children are afforded the opportunity to create independently they tap into critical problem solving skills and avenues for self-expression that they would not otherwise discover about themselves, not to mention confidence and independence. Plus it’s fun.”

Lifelong learning through the visual arts has been at the forefront of GreenHill’s mission since its inception in 1974. Children who live at or below the poverty level have limited access to activities outside of the school setting, especially in the arts. The Education Equality Index in March 2016 reported the achievement gap between low-income children and their “more advantaged” peers is growing at a faster rate in North Carolina than in any other state in the nation, with Greensboro and Winston-Salem having larger gaps than more than 70% of major United States cities. The achievement gap, some have argued is not just a problem within the confines of formal education, but is also caused by a dearth of opportunity for low income students. Data suggests that outside experiences are just as meaningful as test scores when it comes to a child’s success later in life.

GreenHill is located at 200 North Davie Street, in the Greensboro Cultural Center.  GreenHill is the center for NC art and promotes the visual arts of North Carolina by engaging a broad community of artists, adults and children through dynamic exhibitions and educational programs while providing a platform for exploration and investment in art.

For more information visit (www.GreenHillnc.org).

Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC, Receives Largest Gift Ever, Valued at $25 Million, including 7 Rembrandt Drawings

January 27, 2017

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The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC’s Ackland Art Museum has received its largest gift ever, donated from alumnus Sheldon Peck and his wife Leena – valued at $25 million.

The unprecedented commitment includes an $8 million endowment to support a new curator and future acquisitions and an art gift of 134 primarily 17th-century European masterworks, valued at $17 million, including seven works by Rembrandt van Rijn.

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Rembrandt van Rijn, Dutch, 1606 – 1669: Canal and Boats with a Distant View of Amsterdam, c. 1640; reed pen and finger rubbing in dark brown (iron-gall) ink, 4-1/16 x 8 in. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The Peck Collection.

With the Peck Collection gift, the Ackland becomes the first public university art museum in the United States to own a collection of drawings by Rembrandt and only the second university art museum in the nation to do so.

The masterworks are a major collection of Dutch and Flemish drawings built by the Pecks over the last four decades. Along with the Rembrandts, the collection includes nearly 100 17th-century Dutch landscape, genre and figural compositions by artists such as Aelbert Cuyp, Jan van Goyen and Jacob van Ruisdael, as well as a dozen 17th-century Flemish drawings by masters like Pieter Paul Rubens, Jacob Jordaens and Paul Bril. A group of 15 18th- and 19th-century Dutch drawings is also part of the collection.

One of the Rembrandt drawings in the collection bears an inscription in the artist’s own handwriting, which until this donation was the last known drawing with such an inscription remaining in private hands.

“This amazing gift of European Golden Age art treasures – preserved for nearly 400 years and lovingly collected by the Pecks over the past 40 years – delights us today with its timeless beauty and will forever inspire future generations of students, scholars and visitors that come to our historic campus,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “These drawings are a remarkable window through which we glimpse past cultures and times through the eyes of masters. We are honored by the inestimable value of the Pecks’ gift because it advances Carolina’s public mission to serve the people of North Carolina and makes the university a destination for people of all ages from around the world for all time.”

The Pecks’ gift includes the Peck Collection Endowment Fund and the Sheldon Peck Curatorship Fund, dedicated to the care and enhancement of the Peck Collection, including conservation, digitization and cataloging, as well as funds for the acquisition of other European and American masterworks created before 1950.

The endowment will also enable the Ackland to create and support a new position at the museum: the Sheldon Peck curator of European and American art and curator of the Peck Collection. This is the Ackland’s first full-time endowed position.

“We are overjoyed with the Pecks’ exceptionally generous gift of art, funds for its stewardship and support for future acquisitions,” said Ackland Art Museum Director Katie Ziglar. “Thanks to the new curatorial position their endowment also provides, we look forward to organizing a series of special exhibitions focusing on masterworks from the Peck Collection. Works of such high achievement and quality will fascinate and delight Ackland visitors for decades to come.”

With their gift, the Pecks aspire to offer the public a deeper appreciation for the Dutch masters’ celebration of beauty in the everyday.

“The exceptional vision and profound humanity of the Dutch masters’ drawings still have the power to surprise and delight 400 years after their creation. I hope many will experience the pleasure and awe these works still elicit in me every time I study one,” said Sheldon Peck. “I am thrilled the Ackland, with its distinguished tradition of commitment to the research and exhibition of drawings, will now be the steward of what Leena and I have brought together.”

Peck, a native of Durham, is a prominent orthodontic specialist, educator and art collector. After receiving his undergraduate degree from Carolina in 1963 and his doctorate from the UNC School of Dentistry in 1966, he moved to Boston for a residency in orthodontics and then entered private practice and academics. Peck was a clinical professor of developmental biology at the Harvard University School of Dental Medicine for 20 years, and served as an adjunct professor of orthodontics at Carolina’s School of Dentistry.

He has generously donated art to the Ackland since 1988, when he gave a drawing by Allart van Everdingen to the museum in honor of his much-admired older brother and Carolina alumnus, Harvey Peck. Works of art from the Pecks’ collection, many of them exhibited for the first time, were on view in the 1999 Ackland travelling exhibition “Fresh Woods and Pastures New.”

Peck has been a member of the Ackland’s national advisory board since 1987, and he and his wife are longtime supporters of the museum’s “Art For Lunch” lecture series.

“We are thrilled that a longtime board member has made such an unparalleled gift to the Ackland, which brings the museum to a new level of importance in the region and in our country,” said Kate Nevin, Ackland advisory board chair.

About the Ackland Art Museum

Featuring a year-round calendar of special exhibitions and dynamic public programs, the Ackland Art Museum – located on the historic campus of UNC-Chapel Hill – encourages visitors to engage with the rich legacy of the artistic past as well as with living artists from around the world. The Ackland’s holdings consist of more than 18,000 works of art, featuring significant collections of European masterworks, 20th-century and contemporary art, African art, North Carolina pottery and folk art. Additionally, the Ackland holds North Carolina’s premiere collections of Asian art and works on paper (drawings, prints and photographs). This universal collection of artworks from antiquity to the present makes the Ackland uniquely able to advance the teaching and research missions of the University.

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

For further information contact Emily Bowles by calling 919/843-3675 or by e-mail to (emily.bowles@unc.edu).

The Arts Center of Greenwood in Greenwood, SC, Offers Fundraiser on Feb. 4, 2017

December 30, 2016

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The Arts Center of Greenwood in Greenwood, SC, will be presenting all the glitz and glamour of Las Vegas on Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017 at 7-10pm, with Hearts for the Arts Goes to Vegas!. Guests will enjoy extravagantly decorated tables by local artists, an elegant buffet dinner, and fabulous Vegas entertainment from local “rat-pack” styled performers and ELVIS will be in the building!

Attire: Cocktail Glitz
Admission: Members, $95 couple/$50 single | Non-Members, $110 couple/$60 single advanced ticket sales only, guaranteed seating, cash bar available.

For further info call 864/388-7800 or visit (http://www.emeraldtriangle.us/arts-center).

Lessons Learned from Hurricane Hugo in 1989

October 9, 2016

Visual artists of the Carolinas who follow “Carolina Arts” – attention please. PSMG, Inc. who produced “Charleston Arts” at the time was a victim of Hurricane Hugo that kicked the art community in Charleston, SC, in the gut in 1989. For almost a year the tourist economy in Charleston was gone. The city’s hotels were full of re-builders, insurance agents, adjustors, FEMA personal, and lawyers suing insurance companies – but there were few tourist and the locals were busy recovering from the disaster. The arts were pretty much shut down. It was quite a bit later before homeowners got new homes and insurance payments to buy new art for their homes. It was a long draught for the arts. But those in the art community who suffered damages got some help – through the National Endowment for the Arts, State Art Agencies and even local art councils to recover. Some were too proud to ask for help while others dipped into the well as many times as they could. And believe me, if you’re an artist you will be harmed. Maybe the gallery you used to show your work at will close – for a few months or forever. Companies and corporations will be giving funds to help people recover not to the arts. So in one way or another you will be hurt. Maybe your studio is three feet under water or high and dry – the results will be the same – your market just took a big hit. Ask for help, ask for money – it’s going to be there for the arts. Check with the local arts council and your state agency and even the NEA, and do it now as that money won’t last forever. We run an ad for CERF+ an organization who helps craft artists and more who are victims of disasters. Contact them at (http://www.craftemergency.org/). Maybe you don’t need this help but you might know someone who does – let them know they don’t have to recover on their own – help is there – you just have to ask. Back in 1989 we didn’t ask for help – we were not a non-profit and we still are not and will never be one, but it would have been nice to get some anyway – that’s another story. You’re not us – ask.

At the Art League of Hilton Head, SC’s Annual Fundraising ‘Got Art?’ EVERYONE Gets Art! – Oct. 1, 2016

September 8, 2016

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The Art League of Hilton Head, SC’s annual fundraising benefit, Got Art?, promises to make collectors out of art enthusiasts. Each $100 ticket admits two guests into the event and participation in a live drawing that guarantees the ticket holder one original piece of art. Only 100 tickets will be sold. This fun and popular event is sure to be a sell out!

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What makes this event special is that ticket holders go home with an original piece of local art created and donated by Art League member artists. Artwork may include paintings, drawings, photography, collage, jewelry, ceramic and sculpture; each valued at $200 or more.

Not knowing when your name will be called adds a certain element of fun and suspense. You never know which pieces will still be available when it’s your turn to choose. It always proves to be a lively night.

The event takes place on Saturday, October 1, 2016, starting at 4pm. Artwork preview and reception with wine and hors d’oeuvres followed by the exciting main event drawing. When your ticket is drawn, choose an original piece of art! Every ticket is a winner.

More than 100 Got Art? artworks will be on view from Sept. 27-30 from 10am-4pm and on October 1 from 10am-1pm at Art League Gallery.

Purchase a $100 ticket. Visit (www.artleaguehhi.org) or call 843/681-5060. Tickets also available at Art League Gallery and Art League Academy.

Only 100 tickets will be sold. You must have a ticket to attend. Each ticket admits two guests and awards one piece of art.

The Art League of Hilton Head Gallery, located mid-island inside Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, 14 Shelter Cove Lane, Hilton Head Island. Call 843/681-5060 for more information.

Art League of Hilton Head is the only 501(c)(3) nonprofit visual arts organization on Hilton Head Island with a synergistic Art Gallery and teaching Academy that welcome artists and students at all skill levels and in all media.

Art League of Hilton Head promotes and supports the visual arts through education, exhibitions and partnerships for the cultural enhancement of the community and its visitors.

Dare County Arts Council Calls for Applications for Regional Artist Project Grants in Eastern North Carolina – Deadline is Sept. 9, 2016

July 28, 2016

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The Regional Artist Project program is managed through a partnership with the North Carolina Arts Council and 29 local arts councils throughout eastern North Carolina working as a consortium.

Residents in Dare County are eligible to apply for grants that provide financial support to artists at any stage of their career in disciplines such as visual art/craft, music composition, film/video, literature/playwriting, and choreography/dance. Types of fundable projects include the creation of new work, purchase of equipment and materials, and professional development workshops.

“The RAP Grant is an excellent opportunity for artists, musicians, and writers to apply for the funding they need to help make their artistic dreams a reality. DCAC helps fund this grant, which is administered regionally through the NC Arts Council, and we are delighted to offer this to our community,” said Dare County Arts Council Programs Director Fay Davis Edwards.

Application forms and grant guidelines are available online at (www.DareArts.org) and (www.PittCountyArts.org).

Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge serves as administrative arts council for the Eastern North Carolina Regional Consortium and manages the application and review process. Applications must be received no later than Friday, September 9, 2016 to the Pitt County Arts Council, located at 404 S. Evans Street, Greenville, NC 27858 or Dare County Arts Council, located at 300 Queen Elizabeth Avenue, Manteo, NC 27954.

Since 1985, the North Carolina Arts Council has provided funds for the Regional Artist Project to support professional artists. The regional consortium of eastern North Carolina arts councils matches the NC Arts Council to create a pool of funds for the artists. In the East, grant awards to artists generally range from $500 to $1,000, and follow a competitive application and review process.

For more information, contact Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge Executive Director Holly Garriott by e-mail at (holly@pittcountyarts.org) or call 252/551-6947 or Dare County Arts Council Programs Director Fay Davis Edwards at (dareartsprograms@gmail.com) or 252/473-5558.

Asheville Art Museum Receives Grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to Re-install Permanent Collection and Produce an Accompanying Publication

July 17, 2016

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The Henry Luce Foundation recently awarded the Asheville Art Museum in Asheville, NC, a prestigious two-year American Art program grant of $375,000 to support the reinterpretation and reinstallation of the Museum’s Permanent Collection and the first catalogue of the Museum’s collection of American art, which contains nearly 4,000 objects. Scheduled for completion in spring 2018, these projects follow a complete update of the collection database and importantly they will anchor the re-opening of the New Asheville Art Museum following a major expansion and renovation. The project will result in increased accessibility to the Museum’s collections of American Art, ranging in date from the late 19th century to the present, for students, scholars and the public; enhanced collaborations and interdisciplinary interpretation; and a larger role for the Museum and its collections in Western North Carolina and the country. The grant also allows for two Luce Internships, which will provide valuable professional experience for students who are passionate about a career in the arts.

“We thank the Henry Luce Foundation for their longstanding support of scholarship and access to American Art,” said Pamela Myers, Executive Director Asheville Art Museum. “The New Museum and the New Permanent Collection installation and first Catalogue of the Collection will present extraordinary opportunities for longtime residents, newcomers and visitors to be inspired and engaged with art of America and art of the region. The Permanent Collection installation and the catalogue of the Museum’s Permanent Collection will consider multiple and sometimes intersecting narratives in American art. Both the installation and the catalogue will focus on key aspects and strengths of the Museum’s holdings in all media and will provide a narrative framework within which visitors can interact with and experience works of art. The project will be organized to convey the multifaceted historical and contemporary stories of art and culture in Western North Carolina and Southern Appalachia set within the broader context of American aesthetic development. The project will tell the story of our area, explore our sense of place and its relationship to and national impact on the art world.”

The Permanent Collection exhibition space will encompass approximately 4,000 square feet of new and expanded state-of-the-art galleries, which will form the core of the new Museum. The catalogue accompanying the exhibition will contain several hundred pages, including color illustrations. It will highlight significant works from the Collection with entries and thematic essays by curatorial staff and members of the project team. The project team includes scholars with expertise specific to the strengths of the Collection and the interpretive plan.

The Henry Luce Foundation was established in 1936 by Henry R. Luce, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Time Inc., to honor his parents who were missionary educators in China. The Foundation builds upon the vision and values of four generations of the Luce family: broadening knowledge and encouraging the highest standards of service and leadership. A not-for-profit corporation, the Luce Foundation operates under the laws of the State of New York and aims to exemplify the best practices of responsible, effective philanthropy.

The Henry Luce Foundation seeks to bring important ideas to the center of American life, strengthen international understanding, and foster innovation and leadership in academic, policy, religious and art communities. The Luce Foundation pursues its mission through the following grant-making programs: American Art; Asia; Luce Scholars; Theology; Higher Education; the Henry R. Luce Initiative on Religion in International Affairs; Public Policy; and the Clare Boothe Luce Program for women in science, mathematics and engineering.

Founded by artists in 1948 in Asheville, NC, the Asheville Art Museum annually presents an exciting, inviting and active schedule of exhibitions and public programs based on its permanent collection of 20th and 21st century American art. Any visit will also include experiences with works of significance to Western North Carolina’s cultural heritage including Studio Craft, Black Mountain College and Cherokee artists. Special exhibitions feature renowned regional and national artists and explore issues of enduring interest. The Museum also offers a wide array of innovative, inspiring and entertaining educational programs for people of all ages.

Additional information on the Museum’s Collection, upcoming exhibitions and public programs, and the progress of construction of the New Museum can be found at (www.ashevilleart.org).

Seaside Arts Council in Swansboro, NC, Announces 2016 Scholarship Recipients

May 14, 2016

The Seaside Arts Council in Swansboro, NC, is pleased to announce it has awarded four scholarships to local high school seniors pursuing a degree in the visual or performing arts at the college level. Awards will be presented on Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 6:30pm in downtown Swansboro at the Pugliese Pavilion before the SwanFest Concert.

Receiving a $500 scholarship is:
Tara Fevang from Swansboro High School. Tara has a 4.0 grade point average and medaled numerous times on her high school swim team where she served as captain this year. She is a National Honor Society member, event coordinator for Project Unify, and also participates in Student to Student and Interact. Tara is a gifted vocalist with many honors including NC Governors School, NC All County Choir, NC All State Choir, NC All Honors Choir, She has participated in Swansboro High School Choir, Jazz Band Vocalist, and National Anthem vocalist locally and in the New York area. Tara has also volunteered with Onslow County “Buddy Walk”, Carteret County Special Olympics and Queens Creek Elementary’s “After School Program”. Inspired by her little brother, Andrew, who has Downs Syndrome, Tara plans to attend East Carolina University and study Music Therapy with a desire to pursue her Masters in Occupational Therapy and ultimately open her own therapy practice. Tara stated “I want to use music to change lives, and make the world a better place”.

Madison Desmone from Croatan High School. Madison has a 4.45 grade point average and is on the Croatan Tennis Team, Beta Club and National Art Honor Society. She has volunteered in her community with the Coast Federation, Faith in Action Clinic and Emerald Isle Parks and Recreation. Madison plans to attend UNC-Wilmington and study Studio/Fine Art. Her goal is to create art professionally and/or work in a museum or gallery setting. Her dream is to “one day create art that inspires others to go on and create their own”.

Receiving a $250 Scholarship:
Janae Cunningham from Swansboro High School. Janae has a 3.97 grade point average and has participated in the All County Band 3 years in a row, Spring Track, and has served as Foreign Language Club President, Marching Band Section Captain and Varsity Boys Basketball Manager. She was also nominated to join the National Honors Society. Janae’s community service includes Hammocks Beach State Park, Shrimp Festival, Music Festival and Swansboro Public Library. Janae is an excellent mallet percussionist, but can perform on any instrument in the section. She will attend North Carolina A & T in the Fall and work towards a Bachelor’s Degree in Music with a focus in Technology and Minor in Business. Janae also plans to participate in the college ensembles and eventually pursue a higher degree in Music Production.

Bryson Pinkney from Swansboro High School. Bryson has a 3.5 grade point average. Bryson served as Secretary for the Swansboro High School Pirate Gamers, Graphic Designer for the School Newscast, Representative for the Digital Media Program and a member of the Golf Team and National Technical Honor Society. Bryson is active in the Hammocks Beach State Park, Swansboro Parks and Recreation, Swansboro Area Youth Development Foundation, Math Tutor and Career Technical Education Showcase. Bryson plans to major in Graphic Design at Chowan University, Methodist University or The Art Institute of Raleigh-Durham.

Seaside Arts Council is a non-profit organization with a mission to bring the visual and performing arts to the citizens of the greater Swansboro/Western Carteret County area. Our hope is to help these students pursue art, preserve art and pass art to the next generation.

Please visit our website at (www.seasideartscouncil.com) for upcoming events. CONTACT: Debbie Peel, Co-President  by e-mail at (info@seasideartscouncil.com).

South Carolina State Museum in Columbia, SC, Receives $1.4 Million Donation for Acquisitions and Conservation

April 21, 2016

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The South Carolina State Museum Foundation received the largest private monetary donation in its history in the amount of $1,425,000. The donor, who wishes to remain anonymous, has gifted the donation to specifically serve as a tool for the conservation and acquisition of artifacts and objects for the museum’s collection.

This donation will ensure that the museum’s acquisition program remains active, providing funds so that the museum is able to continue to acquire and preserve important artifacts. These artifacts provide a tangible connection to the stories told through the museum’s exhibitions.

“The South Carolina State Museum collection helps tell the stories of our state,” says Paul Matheny, Director of Collections for the State Museum. “The museum preserves artifacts and objects from the past so that we can tell these stories in the future.”

The funds used in this acquisition process will help the museum close gaps within the museum’s collection. A procedure that is very specific, requires objects to be presented by curators to the museum’s acquisition committee for consent and approval. Selections are based on curator’s knowledge of need within their respective collections of natural history, art, cultural history and science and technology.

“We are so appreciative of this generous donation which will be essential in providing the necessary funding to continue our mission of collecting and preserving artifacts representing South Carolina’s wonderful history” said Willie Calloway, executive director. “These objects will be used to provide educational environments that entertain, inspire imagination and creativity, and enrich the lives of our visitors”

Founded in 1980, the State Museum Foundation was established as a non-profit ((501(c)(3)) organization to support the mission of the South Carolina State Museum. The foundations helps promote the programs and welfare of the museum, sound educational programs and exhibits, and give the public an opportunity to become involved in the educational efforts, history, natural history, science and technology, and art of South Carolina.

As the state’s largest and most comprehensive museum, the South Carolina State Museum, offers a unique, entertaining and educational experience to visitors throughout its 225,000 square foot facility located in the heart of downtown Columbia’s Congaree Vista. The State Museum is housed in one of its greatest artifacts, an 1894 old textile mill full of character and charm. In addition to beautiful meeting spaces throughout the facility, guests can explore outer space in one of the largest planetariums in the Southeast, watch an interactive 4D movie and look through a vintage telescope in a one-of-a-kind observatory. These exciting opportunities are all in addition to the four floors of South Carolina art, cultural history, natural history and science/technology that guests can experience.

For further information visit (www.scmuseum.org).

Lancaster County Council of the Arts in Lancaster, SC, Calls for Applications for LCCA Academic Scholarship – Deadline Apr. 29, 2016

April 6, 2016

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The Lancaster County Council of the Arts in Lancaster, SC, is accepting applications for the $500 LCCA Academic Scholarship, which will be awarded to a high school senior residing in Lancaster County who will graduate during 2015-16 school year. Student must be accepted as a full-time undergraduate student at a fully accredited college, university or technical college. A major in dance, literature, music, theatre, folk & traditional arts or visual arts is preferred , but not a requirement.

Deadline to apply is 3pm, Friday, April 29, 2016.

Applicants may submit the application package to the offices of the Lancaster County Council of the Arts, 201 West Gay Street, Lancaster, or by mail to PO Box 613, Lancaster, SC, 29721.

Sponsors of this scholarship are the Board of Directors and Officers of the Lancaster County Council of the Arts.  Future scholarships will also be funded by businesses, organizations and individual citizens who have designated funds for this program.

Online applications may be obtained through the LCCA website at (www.lccarts.net), and paper copies are available at local high school guidance offices or by calling the LCCA offices at 803/285-7451.