Archive for the ‘SC Pottery’ Category

Hub City Empty Bowls in Spartanburg, SC, Launches 2017 Program

May 31, 2017

Hub City Empty Bowls – an annual fundraiser that uses handmade pottery bowls to feed hungry Spartanburg citizens – has set the 2017 dates for its well-attended events. There will be three regularly scheduled bowl-making events: Saturday, July 15, 2017, at 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s pottery studio at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC; Thursday, July 20, 2017, from 5-8pm at West Main Artists Co-Op, during ArtWalk; and Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017, at 10am-noon and 1-3pm at Chapman Cultural Center. Soup Day will be Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017, from 11am-4pm at Chapman Cultural Center. All events are free and family friendly.

Hub City Empty Bowls is a localized fundraiser inspired the international Empty Bowls decentralized program. Locally, the program’s spearhead Carolina Clay Artists coordinates public bowl-making sessions. At no charge, citizens of all ages are given supplies, tools, space, and instructions on how to make hand-shaped pottery bowls. Those unfinished bowls are left at the venue to be painted and fired by experienced potters. Bowls often made by children can be simple, primitive, and charming. Others made by experienced potters can be precise, intricate, and sophisticated.

With hundreds of bowls created by local citizens, Carolina Clay Artists then hosts Soup Day, an event where patrons receive the bowls – each for a $15 donation to TOTAL Ministries, a local charity that provides food and other resources to people in financial crisis. In addition to receiving bowls, the patrons can enjoy a meal of soup, bread, and tea donated by the community’s leading restaurants, hear live music, bid in a silent auction, and enjoy the fellowship and comradery of knowing they are helping to feed people in need. In 2016, the Carolina Clay Artists donated a record-breaking $33,000 to TOTAL Ministries.

“Coordinating Hub City Empty Bowls is a massive undertaking,” 2017 Chairman Bruce Bowyer said. “People want to know as soon as possible about our dates so they can plan accordingly. Some people come to all of the bowl-making sessions and Soup Day. Plus, by setting the dates early, we can better handle the large crowds of people who normally show up. It is not unusual for us to have several hundred people come to a bowl-making session. And come Soup Day, we’ll see more than a thousand.”

Despite the crowds, it is seldom anyone has to wait to make a bowl or enjoy Soup Day. Space, volunteers, and experience are plentiful enough to keep everyone engaged.

Carolina Clay Artists is a local group of hobbyist and professional potters who come together monthly to share ideas, hold workshops and demos, and tour pottery studios to see other artists’ work and learn new ideas. It is open to all who have an interest in learning and sharing about pottery. Annual dues are $35. Hub City Empty Bowls is the group’s annual charity fundraising event to help feed the hungry.

TOTAL Ministries got its start in 1982 as Project Eat. Founder Dannie Horne saw an unemployment rate of 9.7% and that many people in Spartanburg County were hungry. During the first 17 months of Project Eat’s existence, $190,000 of groceries were distributed in an effort to alleviate that problem. In 1983, TOTAL Ministries of Spartanburg County, Inc. was incorporated by 12 Spartanburg churches to carry on the work of Project Eat. Since then, additional emergency services have been added to the TOTAL mission in an effort to help those in need. For those in need, TOTAL can help with utility services, food, and medications.

Empty Bowls started in 1990 by Michigan art teacher John Hartom, who organized a charitable event to give his art students a way to make a personal difference in the lives of others in their community. Hartom’s students made pottery bowls in their high school art classes, and the finished products were then used as individual serving pieces for a fundraising meal of soup and bread. From that simple beginning, Empty Bowls has spread around the world, taking root in communities both small and large. Spartanburg had its first Empty Bowls program in 2009. All Empty Bowls efforts are locally based with all proceeds going to a local charity with a mission to alleviate hunger in its community. None of the money raised leaves the community. The lead agency, Carolina Clay Artists, donates all of its time and talents, and receives no monetary benefit. Locally, all proceeds go to TOTAL Ministries.

For more information about Hub City Empty Bowls, please visit online at (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com) or call 864.706-3739 or 864/585-9167.

Winthrop University Professor of Fine Arts Jim Connell feels honored to be “an outsider” at Mint Museum’s Potters Market Invitational in Charlotte, NC – Sept. 12, 2015

September 9, 2015

The first artist “outside” of North Carolina to be invited to participate in the annual Mint Museum Potters Market Invitational in Charlotte, NC, that is.

A major attraction for the Charlotte area, the Mint Museum will welcome more than 1,000 people at this year’s invitational, set for Sept. 12, 2015, from 10am-4pm at the Randolph location. The event will feature the work of Connell and 50 North Carolina potters as well as pottery demonstrations, food, live music and more. Tickets are $10 and include museum admission. Kids 12 and younger are free.

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Work by Jim Connell

Though the invitational has featured only North Carolina potters for the last decade, organizers decided to expand and invite Connell to participate.

“It is indeed an honor to be picked,” he said. “I go to the invitational most every year and many of the participants are friends and colleagues I have known for years. It’s always fun to see what they are up to and of course to reconnect.

“We potters are a close and supporting group of people. I never thought I would be invited as this was started to just feature NC potters. This year they’ll get to see my work. It’s all about respect.”

Connell has worked in the ceramics medium for more than 30 years. His work has appeared in more than 500 exhibitions, with 15 of his pieces later acquisitioned for museums. In 2004, he traveled to China to study ceramics on an International Residence Award through the National Council on the Education for the Ceramic Arts.

He joined Winthrop’s faculty in 1987.

Presented by the Delhom Service League, a ceramics affiliate of The Mint Museum, the invitational helps fulfill the Delhom’s mission “to promote ceramic arts and education.” It’s raised more than $200,000 since it began in 2004.

To purchase tickets online and for more information, visit (http://www.mintmuseum.org/happenings/761/mint-museum-potters-market-invitational-2015/?utm_source=Potters+Market+%2B+This+Week+08.25.15&utm_campaign=PMI_08.27.15&utm).

Celebrate Clay at the South Carolina Clay Conference in Newberry, SC – Feb. 27-Mar. 1, 2015

February 14, 2015

Attention potters and pottery lovers!

There is something new and exciting in South Carolina – the 1st Annual South Carolina Clay Conference – Moving Clay Forward. The conference is sponsored by the City of Newberry PRT and will be held on Feb. 27 & 28 and Mar. 1, 2015 at the Newberry Arts Center in historic downtown Newberry, SC.

For this first SCCC, art program and conference organizer Marquerite F. Palmer has brought together presenters Sue Grier from Asheville, NC and Mike Vatalaro from Greenville, SC. With many years experience each, both potters will demonstrate their talents and techniques during the conference. The overriding theme for this year is Altered Vessels. Also during the weekend, the presenters will have their work for sale along with pieces from the conference attendees. The pottery sale will be open to the public on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 27 & 28. The Newberry Arts Center is located at 1107 College St., Newberry, SC 29108.

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Work by Sue Grier

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Work by Mike Vatalaro

Modeled after well-known clay conferences in North Carolina and Alabama, the conference will allow for presenters and attendees to be immersed in conversation on ‘all things clay’. Included will be a Friday evening reception and Saturday evening BBQ. Sunday morning, the conference will close with an informative lecture on a clay related topic. Professionals, educators, amateurs and students can all enjoy the creative atmosphere which this type of intimate gathering promotes.

Of the conference, Palmer says ”The City of Newberry Parks, Recreation and Tourism Department has put forth great efforts to create an art center that educates and nurtures the community and surrounding areas with visual art experiences for all ages. Newberry Arts Center – NAC – is thrilled to be hosting the first South Carolina Clay Conference. Instruction in pottery is a large part of our center.  Newberry Arts Center is excited to be bringing clay artists together from all over South Carolina and beyond to help build a stronger clay community and move clay forward in South Carolina.”

The cost of attending the conference is $225 and some meals are included – the complete schedule should be firmed soon. The organizers have set up a block of rooms at the Hampton Inn in downtown Newberry with a double room at $89 a night including continental breakfast.

For more information and registration details, contact: Marquerite Palmer, Art Program Coordinator, at 803/321- 1015 or e-mail to (mpalmer@cityofnewberry.com).

Celebrate Clay at the South Carolina Clay Conference in Newberry, SC – Feb. 27-Mar. 1, 2015

January 23, 2015

Attention potters and pottery lovers!

There is something new and exciting in South Carolina – the 1st Annual South Carolina Clay Conference – Moving Clay Forward. The conference is sponsored by the City of Newberry PRT and will be held on Feb. 27 & 28 and Mar. 1, 2015 at the Newberry Arts Center in historic downtown Newberry, SC.

For this first SCCC, art program and conference organizer Marquerite F. Palmer has brought together presenters Sue Grier from Asheville, NC and Mike Vatalaro from Greenville, SC. With many years experience each, both potters will demonstrate their talents and techniques during the conference. The overriding theme for this year is Altered Vessels. Also during the weekend, the presenters will have their work for sale along with pieces from the conference attendees. The pottery sale will be open to the public on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 27 & 28. The Newberry Arts Center is located at 1107 College St., Newberry, SC 29108.

215newberry-pottery-conf-Sue-Grier
Work by Sue Grier

215newberry-pottery-conf-Mike-Vatalaro
Work by Mike Vatalaro

Modeled after well-known clay conferences in North Carolina and Alabama, the conference will allow for presenters and attendees to be immersed in conversation on ‘all things clay’. Included will be a Friday evening reception and Saturday evening BBQ. Sunday morning, the conference will close with an informative lecture on a clay related topic. Professionals, educators, amateurs and students can all enjoy the creative atmosphere which this type of intimate gathering promotes.

Of the conference, Palmer says ”The City of Newberry Parks, Recreation and Tourism Department has put forth great efforts to create an art center that educates and nurtures the community and surrounding areas with visual art experiences for all ages. Newberry Arts Center – NAC – is thrilled to be hosting the first South Carolina Clay Conference. Instruction in pottery is a large part of our center.  Newberry Arts Center is excited to be bringing clay artists together from all over South Carolina and beyond to help build a stronger clay community and move clay forward in South Carolina.”

The cost of attending the conference is $225 and some meals are included – the complete schedule should be firmed soon. The organizers have set up a block of rooms at the Hampton Inn in downtown Newberry with a double room at $89 a night including continental breakfast.

For more information and registration details, contact: Marquerite Palmer, Art Program Coordinator, at 803/321- 1015 or e-mail to (mpalmer@cityofnewberry.com).

Hub City Empty Bowls to Host Bowl-Making Event at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC – July 19, 2014

July 9, 2014

chapmanculturalcenterlogo

Hub City Empty Bowls, a charity that raises money to feed local needy citizens, invites the public to Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, Saturday, July 19, 2014, to help feed the hungry by making clay bowls. There will be two opportunities this day for all ages and experience levels to drop by and make bowls: 10am ­- noon and 1 – 3­pm.

These bowls will later be painted, glazed, and fired, and then used on Soup Day, which will take place Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014, at Chapman. Soup Day is a day of food, music and charity, where the handmade bowls are filled with soup from local restaurants for a donation of $15. Patrons keep the bowls, as reminders of their participation in this charitable event. This year, the proceeds will benefit TOTAL Ministries, a charity assisting those in Spartanburg facing financial hardships.

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All bowl-making events are free. This is the sixth year that Hub City Empty Bowls has participated in this international drive to feed the hungry. Last year, 1,400 bowls were made and more than $20,000 was raised locally. This year’s sponsors are Chapman Cultural Center, West Main Artists Co-Op, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg County Foundation, Action Printing, Carolina Clay Artists, and Chris Williams, owner of Clay-King.com.

For more info, call 864/621-2768 or visit (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com).

Hub City Empty Bowls’ Soup Day Takes Place Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC

November 6, 2013

chapmanculturalcenterlogo

After five months of coordinating the making of more than 1,400 handmade pottery bowls – made mostly by the untrained yet very enthusiastic general public – Hub City Empty Bowls is ready to serve soup and raise money on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, 11am to 7:30pm.

“Soup Day is upon us, and I think we are ready,” Nancy Williamson, the project’s co-coordinator, said. “We have the bowls, we have the soup, we have the music, and we have the need. Now all we need is for the people to come out on Saturday, Nov. 9, to Chapman Cultural Center and enjoy the experience of eating gourmet soup, fellowship, and the moral reward of knowing that for $15 many of the needy, poor and hungry citizens of our community will have their next meal.”

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All of the money raised at this annual event will go to TOTAL Ministries, a local charity that provides food to the community’s most impoverished citizens. Last year, Empty Bowls raised more than $12,000 for the Spartanburg Soup Kitchen.

Empty Bowls is a national social phenomenon where the potters in individual communities spearhead an effort to raise money for a local charity whose mission is to feed the hungry. With no oversight and little overhead, Carolina Clay Artists, an organization of local potters, organizes the event and coordinates several bowl-making sessions for the general public. Most of the bowls were made at the Spartanburg Art Museum School at Chapman Cultural Center and at West Main Artists Co-op, shaped by hand, rather than thrown on a wheel. The potters instruct the citizens on how to make the bowls, and the clay is provided at no charge. During the months of preparation, the bowls are painted and glazed.

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In addition, professional potters, Carolina Clay Artists members, and Spartanburg Art Museum students and teachers have donated soup bowls for the event. Spartanburg School District 7 has donated bowls that were made from start to finished bowls by their teachers, Spartanburg High pottery students, and Jessie Boyd’s Art Club. Interspersed in the offering of very basic bowls the public can find some treasures. “There’s the feeling of a treasure hunt to the event,” Williamson said. “People look for special bowls, some made by professionals and some made by little children.”

On Soup Day, all of the colorful and various size bowls are brought out. For a $15 donation, a citizen can pick out his or her favorite bowl and have it filled with the soup of his choice. This year, there are about 20 restaurants providing soup. In addition, bread and iced tea will be provided. There will be an ongoing silent auction in the midst of the bowls and soup. “Soup Day is the most amazing experience,” Williamson said. “It is always one of those feel-good experiences. You have such a grassroots atmosphere of handmade bowls, top-quality soup, live music, and the fellowship of kindred souls all coming together to make Spartanburg a better place to live.”

“I’ve bought several bowls over the years,” supporter Steve Wong said. “Soup Day is great fun, but for me the best part is getting to keep the bowl. It never fails that when I go to my kitchen cabinet for a bowl, I always choose one from Empty Bowls. It just means something special. It’s a reminder of how lucky I am to have food to put in my bowl.”

In addition to the bowls, soup, and live music, a new element is being introduced to the Hub City Empty Bowl experience: drum circles. There will be two drum circles: one starts at 11am; the other starts at 5pm. Both will happen outdoors in the Chapman Cultural Center plaza. The public is invited to join the communal drum circles by bringing whatever percussion instrument available and adding sound to the rhythms that will be lead by experienced drum circle enthusiasts.

“We think having drum circles will be a great new thing for Soup Day,” Williamson said. “It seems like a natural pairing, both being so basic and in touch with nature. I kind of think of the drums as calling people to come join in.”

It is by the very nature of the Empty Bowls phenomenon that the bowl making, Soup Day, and fundraising are accomplished by many people working together for a common cause. “So much credit must be given to Carolina Clay Artists,” Williamson said. “They are the heart and soul of this project and Empty Bowls in Spartanburg would not happen without them. They secure the clay, the locations, the instruction: They basically do all of the heavy lifting and spend their weekends glazing, painting, washing and just doing whatever needs to be done. Others who need to be recognized are Spartanburg Art Museum’s Art School, Chapman Cultural Center, West Main Artist Co-op, and donors Chris Williams of Clay-King and Steve and Joanne Metcalf.”

Live music by…

• 11am – The Lovely Jodie
• noon – Fayssoux
• 1pm – Rich Nelson and the acoustic trio “176”
• 2pm – Anna V
• 3pm – The Windjammers
• 4pm – Frank Walker
• 5pm – Mark Miller
• 6pm – Matthew Knights

Soup & Other Food Provided by…

Soup…
Backporch, Basil’s Grille, Billy D’s, Blue Moon Catering, Chef Bill McClellan, SCC, Cribb’s Kitchen, Cuzina’s, Farmer’s Table, Garner’s, Gerhards, Holden’s Ranch, Ice Cream/Coffee Beans, LaTravena, Lime Leaf, Mon Amie, Movable Feasts & Spartanburg ARP Youth, Palmetto Palate, Terrace at Spartanburg Marriott, and Wild Aces.

Beverages and Bread…
Beacon Drive-In, Cakehead Bakery, Little River Roasting, Dutch Plate, Jimmy John’s, Longhorn, and Wade’s Southern Cooking.

For more information, please call Nancy Williamson at 864/621-2768.

Hub City Empty Bowls 2013 Gets Off to an Early Start at the Spartanburg Art Museum in Spartanburg, SC – June 15, 2013

June 5, 2013

The popular grassroots fundraiser that helps feed the hungry in Spartanburg, SC – Hub City Empty Bowls-is cranking up early for 2013. The first two bowl-making dates are Saturday, June 15, 2013, from 10am-noon and 1-3pm at the Spartanburg Art Museum School in the Chapman Cultural Center, and Thursday, June 20, 2013, 6-8:30pm at the West Main Artists Co-op in Spartanburg.

The goal of the organizing sponsor, Carolina Clay Artists, is to make more than 1,000 handmade clay bowls to be used on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, when hundreds of people will donate cash in exchange for the colorful and creative bowls filled with soup donated by local restaurants. Everyone is encouraged to help make bowls. No experience in pottery is required. All materials and instruction will be provided free.

After four years of raising tens of thousands of dollars for different hunger-based charities in Spartanburg, the Carolina Clay Artists return for the fifth year determined to make the event even bigger and better. In the past, Empty Bowls has been about a three-month project. This year, it will run for five months in an effort to give citizens more opportunities to participate. It has been one of Spartanburg’s most successful events in helping feed the poor. The fundraiser – Soup Day – will be held in the lobby of the David W. Reid Theatre and in the plaza of Chapman Cultural Center on Saturday, Nov. 9, 11am-7pm. In addition to soup, bread and tea, live music, and fellowship are provided for a community event that generates a groundswell of grassroots charity, as well as much needed funds. Patrons especially enjoy taking home the clay bowls, as sentimental reminders of how they have contributed to Spartanburg’s advancement. Traditionally, patrons donate $15 per bowl. The soup is all you can eat, and there will be a variety of restaurants providing soup throughout the day.

Empty Bowls is an international phenomenon that is virtually administrative and overhead free. All work is done by local volunteers, most of whom are potters. All of the money raised stays in the local community. Last year, more than $12,000 was given to the Spartanburg Soup Kitchen. This year’s recipient of the funds will be TOTAL Ministries of Spartanburg. Public bowl-making events will be held at both the Spartanburg Art Museum School, located in Chapman Cultural Center, 200 East Saint John St. (10am-noon and 1-3pm) and the West Main Artist Co-op, 578 West Main Street (6-8:30pm).

The dates are: Spartanburg Art Museum/Chapman Cultural Center, Saturdays, June 15, July 20, Aug. 17, Sept. 14; West Main Artists Co-op, Thursdays, June 20, July 18, and Aug. 15—all of which are ArtWalk dates. Sponsors of the 2013 Empty Bowls fundraising event include: Carolina Clay Artists, Spartanburg Art Museum, Chapman Cultural Center, the West Main Artists Co-op and Chris Williams, owner of local pottery supply house, Clay-King.com.

For more information about Hub City Empty Bowls Soup, call 864/621-2768.

Vista Studios in Columbia, SC, Host the Midlands Clay Arts Society’s 12th Annual Holiday Sale – Nov. 29 – Dec. 2, 2012

November 23, 2012

Vista Studios in Columbia, SC, will present the Midlands Clay Arts Society’s 12th Annual Holiday Sale, on view in Gallery 80808, from Nov. 29 through Dec. 2, 2012. An opening reception will be held on Nov. 29, from 5-8pm.

The Midlands Clay Arts Society’s 12th Annual Holiday Sale features one-of-a-kind, handmade gifts by South Carolina based ceramic artists. It is a much anticipated opportunity to view and purchase unique, original, works of art, from whimsical sculptures to classic functional pieces, decorative accessories, and everything in between.


Work by Tuula Widdifield

Participating artists for this year’s event are: Adele Thornhill, Alice Klaas, Anne Schultz, Barbara Mitchell, Becky Leonard, Betsy Kaemmerlen, Dawn Caldwell, Jeannie Lindler, Margaret Arial, Mary Lou Price, Mary Lou Wu, Pam Bailey, Patz & Mike Fowle, Renee Rouillier, Rick Shackleford, Rita Ruth Cockrell, Susan Kennedy, Susan Tondreau-Dwyer, Susanne Sievers, Suzy Shealy, Teresa Tipton, Terry Meek, Tim Graham, and Tuula Widdifield.


Work by Mike & Patz Fowle

The event takes place at Gallery 80808 at 808 Lady Street, Columbia SC 29201. The sale takes place over four days: Thursday, Nov. 29, noon-8pm; Friday, Nov. 30, noon-8pm; Saturday, Dec. 1, noon-4pm; and Sunday, December 2, noon-4pm. Admission is free; cash and checks only are accepted.

MCAS was organized in 1987 to foster fellowship, education and creativity among local potters and clay artists and to promote appreciation of all things made from clay.

If you would like more information about the sale, contact Adele Thornhill by e-mail at (adele@adelethornhill.com) or call 201/839-6386 or visit the MCAS Facebook page at (www.facebook.com/MidlandsClayArts).

Rock Hill Pottery Center in Rock Hill, SC, Offers Annual Holiday Sale – Starting Nov. 23, 2012

November 8, 2012

The Rock Hill Pottery Center in Rock Hill, SC, is hosting our 5th Annual Holiday Sale from Nov. 23 – Dec. 3, 2012.  Everything from functional dinnerware to decorative vases will be available for sale, just in time for the holiday gift giving season. Selected items are 20% off.

Our pottery is handcrafted by skilled artists in our studios at the Gettys Art Center, 201 E. Main Street in Rock Hill.  Convenient parking is in the rear of building. Enter from the loading dock entrance.

Hours are 10am – 4pm.

For further info contact Bob Hasselle at 803/370-8109, or Christine White at 803/327-1294.

USC Lancaster in Lancaster, SC, Opens Native American Studies Center – Oct. 4, 2012

September 17, 2012

On Oct. 4, 2012, the USC Lancaster Native American Studies Program in downtown Lancaster, SC, will host a public open house to inaugurate the opening of its new center.

Faculty and staff of this 15,000 square foot facility in historic downtown Lancaster invite the public to tour the new Native American Studies Center at 119 South Main Street from 5-7pm. Guests will have the opportunity to tour the NAS Center’s gallery spaces, archives, classrooms, and archaeology, language, and audio-visual labs. Refreshments will be provided and performers and artists will be on hand to demonstrate Native American traditions.


Artwork in the background by Fran Gardner; large wedding jug on the right by Earl Robbins (Duke Energy Collection); and small wedding jug on the left, teaching piece by Monty Branham and Evelyn George (Duke Energy Collection).

Through a partnership between USCL and the City of Lancaster, the Native American Studies Center was established to promote regional Native American art, culture, and history. Home to the world’s largest collection of Catawba Indian pottery, the NAS Center will offer exhibits of regional Native American Art, classes and programs focused on Native American history, culture, archaeology, folklore, and language.

Following the Oct. 4 open house, the NAS Center will be open Tue.-Wed., 10am-5pm; Thur., 10am-7pm; Fri.-Sat., 10am-5pm; Sun., 1-5pm; and Mon. by appointment. Both the public open house and regular admission are free.

For further details, call 803/313-7172, e-mail to (criswese@mailbox.sc.edu), or visit (http://usclancaster.sc.edu/NAS/).