Archive for the ‘SC Visual Arts’ Category

Charleston County Main Library in Charleston, SC, Offers Exhibit and Lecture by Ron Anton Rocz and Lamar Hunter – Oct. 19, 2016

October 17, 2016

You are invited to a special program and photography exhibit this Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, at the Charleston County Main Library auditorium, at 6pm, in downtown, Charleston, SC. The photography exhibit is “MOVING STAR” by local photographer Ron Anton Rocz, featuring local hip hop dancer Lamar Hunter as he interprets local outdoor murals and a variety of settings related to African American history in Charleston.


The program will include dance demonstrations, video, and a dialogue between Ron and Lamar about their collaboration, their 10 year mentor/mentee relationship, race relations, and the meaning of hip hop generally and specifically in Lamar’s life. Come see what this 19 year old black young man and 75 year old white guy have pulled off. A rare treat.


For further info contact Ron Rocz by e-mail at (

The Hilton Head Art Auction Has Been Rescheduled for Nov. 5, 2016, on Hilton Head Island, SC

October 15, 2016

Due to Hurricane Matthew, our October event was cancelled and has been rescheduled for Nov. 5, 2016, at 2pm. You can preview the works at Morris & Whiteside Auctions, 220 Cordillo Parkway, Hilton Head Island, SC (also the location of the Red Piano Gallery), from Nov. 1 – 5, 2016.

Work by Ray Ellis

Over 110 items will be up for bids including works by: Ray Ellis, Kim English, Glenna Goodacre, William Halsey, Clark Hulings, Dan McCaw, Dean Mitchell, Joseph Orr, William Aiken Walker, Mary Whyte, Jamie Wyeth, and Stephen Scott Young.

For over fifteen years, Morris & Whiteside Auctions, LLC has produced premier fine art auctions on Hilton Head Island and in Charleston, SC. Offering significant paintings, sculpture and vintage prints by deceased and contemporary masters of the South, the annual Fall event attracts an extensive database of proven collectors from throughout the United States.

View the complete catalogue at (

For further info call us at 843/785-2318.

Hurricanes Have Victims, But the Media Hurts Many More

October 12, 2016

When a hurricane comes to an area, it leaves many victims in its path, but not all are wiped out of commission, but media reports of disasters can leave all in the path of their destruction. I learned this during Hurricane Hugo and I see it happening again during the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew.

I live 45 miles North-West of Charleston, SC, and had power until 11:30am Saturday, Oct., 8, 2016, when Hurricane Matthew had already come to the Charleston area and headed to North Carolina where it really did some of the worst damage in the form of rain and flooding in the US. I heard the weather folks tell us that Matthew could do more damage than Hugo in Charleston and then they went on to the next place the storm was headed. They never seem to follow up on anything but damage done. They’ll search and search until they can find that one place to stand in front of and show a huge tree down on a house or cars floating in water. They don’t come back and show what wasn’t harmed.

I feel sorry for those who suffered damage, those who are still suffering and those who may still feel damage from this hurricane. But this isn’t Haiti. Americans recover from damage much more quickly from tragedy and have the capacity to take a hit and at the same time help others.

I recently made a trip to downtown Charleston on Oct. 10, just a few days after the arrival of Hurricane Matthew and I was amazed at how little signs of damage was seen just a few days later – unlike Hurricane Hugo. Here’s a few notices I’ve received that represent pleas from folks who did not suffer damage from the storm, but don’t want people to forget them.

A Letter from Charleston, SC, from Hagan Fine Art Gallery and Studio, located at 27 1/2 State Street, in the heart of the French Quarter area of historic Charleston, SC.

Thank you for your calls and e-mails of support!

Dear Friends,

We’d like to give you an update on what’s going on in Charleston right now.  In general, we all feel very lucky to have homes and businesses to walk back into with little or no damage from Hurricane Matthew. However, there are many people here that are still struggling with no power and damaged homes.  Our pretty little State Street remained high and dry during the storm, and the gallery and paintings are all safe.  Our staff’s homes are all safe and standing. Some of us are still waiting on electricity, but we are all okay and very thankful. Most streets in Downtown Charleston that I’ve been on are dry and passable. Whew… we were spared.

We had just hung Dee Beard Dean and John Beard’s new paintings, when we heard the news of Hurricane Matthew’s approach. So we had to hurry and un-hang the show and store it safely away.  Dee and John’s Show and the Charleston Gallery Association’s Artwalk were cancelled and we covered everything in plastic.  It was an anxious time for everyone in Charleston.

Dee and John have been working on their show for many months, and it was (and still is) so very beautiful. It’s a really awesome thing to be witness to such a family of talent, inspiration and training by seeing these paintings in person and to know the artist who created these works so well.  We have found the paintings to feel calming, relaxing and soothing.

If you need a brief diversion from all the news of the Hurricane maybe you’ll enjoy looking at the paintings or this short video at (

We wish you a speedy recovery if you’re dealing with the aftermath of the storm. If you need any help, please let us know. I have a car full of tarps and plastic, and I’ll deliver if you need them.

If you’re far, far away and you’re getting this – hopefully you’re safe and sound and you’ll enjoy looking and supporting these artists who have worked so hard for their show.  By the way, both Dee’s and John’s homes (as are they) are safe. We were anxious because they both are near the water and John actually lives on a boat in Florida.

If you see a painting you can’t live without, the gallery will extend free shipping on your choices through Sunday at 5PM and we will add a copy of Dee’s beautiful book with the purchase of any of her paintings.

Artwalk (the Charleston Gallery Association first Friday ArttWalk) has been rescheduled for this Friday, October 14th from 5-8pm. Please join us on Friday night in raising a glass to John and Dee and the invincible spirit of Charleston.

Warm wishes, Karen Hagan

For further info call 843/754-0494 or visit (

Here’s a notice from the Franklin G. Burroughs – Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum, located at 3100 S. Ocean Blvd. in Myrtle Beach, SC.

The Museum is Fine and Will Re-open Wednesday, October 12, 2016, at 10am.

If you saw the photos of the damaged Springmaid Pier and worried that the Art Museum was in the same condition – relax.  Aside from a few missing shingles and pieces of siding, the Museum came through Matthew relatively unscathed.  Power returned on Tuesday and we will open with regular Museum hours on Wednesday, October 12th, 2016.  We can’t express enough our gratitude to the City of Myrtle Beach for their help with our outdoor issues.

On exhibit is the “39th Annual South Carolina Watermedia Society Juried Exhibition”. Celia Pearson’s “Layerings: A Glimpse of Southeast Asia” will re-open shortly. The delayed opening for “Logan Woodle: Blessed Burdens” will be Tuesday, October 18th from 5:30 – 7:30pm, featuring a Gallery Talk by the artist.

If you have questions about any other events or the Museum itself, please contact us via our website at (, or by leaving a voicemail at 843/238-2510. We promise we will get back to you as quickly as possible.

Thank you for your support of the Art Museum, which is normally open Tuesday – Saturday, 10am – 4pm and Sunday 1 – 4pm, closed Mondays.

Don’t believe all reports by the media about these storms and don’t just write off whole areas that suffer some sort of damage. After the storm is when they really need your support. No one wants guakers but they also don’t want to be written off for a long period of time. Check with them to see if they’re ready to accept your visit. They’d love you to come see them – they need you to come see them.

Lessons Learned from Hurricane Hugo in 1989

October 9, 2016

Visual artists of the Carolinas who follow “Carolina Arts” – attention please. PSMG, Inc. who produced “Charleston Arts” at the time was a victim of Hurricane Hugo that kicked the art community in Charleston, SC, in the gut in 1989. For almost a year the tourist economy in Charleston was gone. The city’s hotels were full of re-builders, insurance agents, adjustors, FEMA personal, and lawyers suing insurance companies – but there were few tourist and the locals were busy recovering from the disaster. The arts were pretty much shut down. It was quite a bit later before homeowners got new homes and insurance payments to buy new art for their homes. It was a long draught for the arts. But those in the art community who suffered damages got some help – through the National Endowment for the Arts, State Art Agencies and even local art councils to recover. Some were too proud to ask for help while others dipped into the well as many times as they could. And believe me, if you’re an artist you will be harmed. Maybe the gallery you used to show your work at will close – for a few months or forever. Companies and corporations will be giving funds to help people recover not to the arts. So in one way or another you will be hurt. Maybe your studio is three feet under water or high and dry – the results will be the same – your market just took a big hit. Ask for help, ask for money – it’s going to be there for the arts. Check with the local arts council and your state agency and even the NEA, and do it now as that money won’t last forever. We run an ad for CERF+ an organization who helps craft artists and more who are victims of disasters. Contact them at ( Maybe you don’t need this help but you might know someone who does – let them know they don’t have to recover on their own – help is there – you just have to ask. Back in 1989 we didn’t ask for help – we were not a non-profit and we still are not and will never be one, but it would have been nice to get some anyway – that’s another story. You’re not us – ask.

The October 2016 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

October 1, 2016

1016carolinaarts-coverThe October 2016 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at ( – all 80 pages of it – a few more than last month.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.
And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the November 2016 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the October 24th deadline. You do know you can be early. Some folks are already several months ahead of the deadline when their press release would be due.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306 (a new number)

Spartanburg, SC, Unveils Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light – Oct. 4, 2016

September 30, 2016


Award-winning light and digital media artist Erwin Redl will unveil nine public art installations in Spartanburg, SC, on Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016, as a part of Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge. For more than a year, Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light has been building relationships between police officers and communities through a collaborative art-making process.

The installations will be illuminated in conjunction with National Night Out events across 10 city neighborhoods, starting with a celebration at 4:30pm at Mobile Suspension downtown in Denny’s Plaza, 203 E. Main Street, Spartanburg, SC. Composed of five curtains of semi-transparent acrylic panes – nearly 7,000 in total – Mobile Suspension is the result of Redl’s creative design and the collective efforts of residents and police officers who volunteered to assemble the large-scale installation. During the day, sunlight will shine through the mobile, casting colors onto the ground like stained glass. At night, LED lights provided by Hubbell Lighting Inc. in Greenville, SC, will illuminate the mobile from below.

The Oct. 4 event will feature music, food and comments from Spartanburg Mayor Junie White; Jennifer Evins, CEO of the Chapman Cultural Center; Spartanburg Police Chief Alonzo Thompson and neighborhood residents, who will talk about the year-long effort to revitalize the city through art. The illumination of each installation will coincide with a neighborhood celebration at the site, ending with a grand finale at 8:30pm at Glow at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, 350 Howard St., Spartanburg. See below for a schedule of the Oct. 4 celebration.

“By bringing site-specific art into Spartanburg neighborhoods where residents may feel isolated from traditional cultural assets, this project is already fostering greater understanding of both the artistic process and the transformative impact of public art,” said Jennifer Evins, president and CEO of the Chapman Cultural Center. “We are eliminating barriers as residents become part of the artistic process and help translate ideas into works of art.”

In 2015, the City of Spartanburg was selected as one of four communities to participate in the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge, a new program to support temporary public art projects that celebrate creativity, enhance urban identity, encourage public-private partnerships, and drive economic development. The temporary art project, funded by $1 million from Bloomberg Philanthropies, with supplemental funding provided by regional institutions, corporations, foundations and private donors, is a partnership among Redl, the Chapman Cultural Center, the City of Spartanburg and civic leadership.

Redl, whose art installations have illuminated spaces worldwide, has been working with neighborhood residents and community leaders for more than a year to bring the project to life. The artist said each installation is tailored to its environment and that the scale, medium and design vary significantly, ranging from workshop-based video and smaller light installations to large-scale illuminations of two smokestacks.

“Different structures lead to different aesthetic explorations and community engagement possibilities,” Redl said. “Alternative structures lead to alternative results. Change is inevitable, and, through this process, we begin to see Spartanburg in a new light.”

Mayor White said the efforts of Redl and all of those across the community to bring Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light to life are already bearing fruit.

“The night of Oct. 4 is going to be a great night in the history of our community,” said Spartanburg Mayor Junie White. “Something special is happening in Spartanburg right now. Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light is symbolic of what is happening here, and I can’t wait to see the lights come on for everyone.”

Below is a description of the installations and the schedule of the Oct. 4 events:


Mobile Suspension, Downtown Spartanburg, Denny’s Plaza, 203 E. Main St. – Lights On – 4:30-6pm, Oct. 4.

Five multicolored mobile curtains float above the center lawn of Denny’s Plaza, located in the heart of Spartanburg’s Downtown Cultural District. Each curtain is 51 feet long and 12 feet high and consists of a woven pattern of translucent acrylic 4-inch by 4-inch squares. The installation was designed to create a dazzling visual experience that changes depending on the time of day, the viewer’s position, and weather conditions. The five shimmering curtains are made of multicolored acrylic squares installed in specific patterns designed by the artist. Community volunteers assembled the curtains over a one-month period using specially designed clips. The rectangular shape of the site gave Redl an opportunity to play with subtle variations within a grid. The artist is interested in creating unique visceral sensations for viewers, and Mobile Suspension offers a kaleidoscopic experience that is fresh with each new encounter.

River Poetry, Andrews Farm and Converse Heights, Cottonwood Trail, 1038 Woodburn Road – Lights On – 5:45pm.

Here, artist Erwin Redl provides an opportunity for visitors to contemplate the role of technology in our lives within a nature preserve. Located between Converse Heights and Andrews Farm neighborhoods, the Cottonwood Trail is a 116-acre urban greenspace with 4 1/2 miles of trails, and is owned and maintained by the Spartanburg Area Conservancy, a membership-based nonprofit organization. By juxtaposing LED displays similar to those used by restaurants and gas stations against the solitude of a meandering creek, the artist creates a tangible demonstration that nature and digital technology can coexist. The project presents local poetry displayed on twelve double-sided LED signs suspended above the Cottonwood Trail. Visitors can read the lines of poetry overhead as they walk along Lawson’s Fork Creek. The layered poetry dimension allows for the community to provide their thoughts, observations, and feelings about nature within this dynamic human/nature system created by the artist. The Hub City Writers Project will curate an ongoing series of poems for River Poetry through March 2017.

Under One Roof, South Converse, Picnic Shelter, 440 S. Converse St. – Lights On – 6:10pm.

This park has special meaning to South Converse residents as a sign of local pride and a link to the past. The local neighborhood association fought hard to get this park funded and completed. Touched by the story of the park’s origin, and inspired by the evident pride in the place, Redl decided to use this picnic shelter to demonstrate the transformative power of turning something ordinary into something extraordinary. Residents have attended workshops to learn how to install and program the LED lighting for the shelter. Redl hopes local residents will want to create special light programs for dances, poetry slams, cookouts, or other events in and around the shelter. By using a simple picnic shelter as the basic structure within which many things can happen, and by involving the local community, Redl has tangibly illustrated that we are all indeed together under one roof.


Islands of Light, Maxwell Hills, Duncan Park Lake, 293 West Park Drive – Lights On – 6:30pm.

Redl explores the fertile intersection of art, nature and technology with this installation of eight floating islands recalling the image of cattails or reeds swaying with the breeze in an aquatic environment. The scale of the site was particularly interesting to the artist, as it allowed for interactions among water, wind, and sky in addition to light and reflection. The logistical challenges of the project were first taken on by students from Daniel Morgan Technology Center. After meeting with the artist and an engineer, these young technicians created a working prototype, which became the blueprint for the finished islands. A local dock builder was engaged to install these light-topped atolls. The local waterfowl have officially adopted these islands of light.

Benchmark Spartanburg, Forest Park, CC Woodson Recreation Center, 210 Bomar Avenue – Lights On – 6:55pm.

Benches are for sitting, yes, but they can also be a site for romance, business deals, creative pastimes or great conversations. Redl has created a chromatically pulsating bench that he hopes will invite community gatherings, poetry readings and other events that make use of the mesmerizing patterns and shifting color palette. The multiple RGB LED side-lit acrylic panels that make up the bench create an almost cinematic experience, saturating the surrounding environment with gradually morphing gradations of color.

Spartanburg Swing, Hampton Heights, National Beta Headquarters, 267 S. Spring St. – Lights On – 7:15pm.

Twenty-six four-foot-long pendulums are evenly distributed across the glass facade of the National Beta Headquarters building. Their slow one-second pulse animates the surface of the concrete and glass structure. Mixing the simple physics of a pendulum with the off-the-shelf electronics of a small fan and flashlight LED, Spartanburg Swing creates a complex choreography. This kinetic work is controlled by small microprocessors that turn the fans and the lights on and off in intervals programmed by the artist. The pulsing movement is created entirely by intermittent fan bursts and the constant tug of gravity.

The site is the international headquarters of National Beta, whose purpose is “to promote the ideals of academic achievement, character, leadership, and service among elementary and secondary school students.” Headquartered in Spartanburg, the organization has more than 8,750 clubs nationally and internationally. The Hampton Heights neighborhood, comprised of homes built between the 1880s and the 1920s, is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Video Village, Highland Neighborhood, Cammie Clagget Apartments, 317 Highland Avenue – Lights On – 7:35pm.

The artist decided he wanted to turn these empty buildings in the Cammie Clagget apartment complex inside out, transforming the now-vacant units into lanterns that face outward to tell their stories and cast their light into the surrounding community. The artist is interested in reanimating these empty spaces as a way to draw our attention to the question of impermanence and what might be possible for the future. Playing with the dual meaning of the word projection, Redl created a 52-channel video screen and directed White Elephant Enterprises and the Spartanburg Art Museum to curate the content for the installation. The selected videos feature a variety of topics but focus on stories of and about the residents of this historic neighborhood. The curators established a media production studio within the nearby Bethlehem Center to facilitate interviews with residents and to collect vintage home-movie footage and digitize family photographs from the community. The artist hopes to jump-start enthusiasm within the community for making videos of all kinds and sharing them in the public square.


Glow, Beaumont Village and Northside, Beaumont smokestack, 400 Beaumont Avenue – Lights On – 8:05pm.

Northside smokestack, 350 Howard St. – Lights On and grand finale celebration – 8:30pm.

Both of the mill properties owned by Spartan Mills today serve new purposes, one as the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine and the other as the administrative offices of Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System. Originally constructed by master builder Thomas Badgett, these two colossal smokestack structures were built in the late nineteenth century out of locally made brick. Edifices such as these, in the heart of mill villages, have historical relevance and serve as symbols of adaptation and change.

Redl has chosen to treat the smokestacks as two synchronized, large-scale canvases for high-powered multicolored lights that bathe the surface of the worn bricks. For the artist, these artworks offer a new way of seeing old structures.

Born in Austria in 1963, Erwin Redl finished his studies at the Vienna Music Academy with two degrees, a BA in Composition (1990) and BA in Electronic Music (1991). He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship for graduate studies in computer art at the School of Visual Arts, in New York City (MFA 1995). Redl investigates the process of “reverse engineering” by (re-)translating the abstract aesthetic language of virtual reality and 3D computer modeling into architectural environments by means of large-scale light installations.

For the 2002 Whitney Biennial, the artist covered the Whitney Museum’s facade with three multicolor LED veils. In 2008 he created a sound and light installation in the Austrian Pavilion at the World Expo in Zaragoza, Spain. The Pacific Design Center’s new Red Building by Cesar Pelli features four permanent installations by the artist, completed in 2013. Redl’s largest work to date is a computer-controlled, 580-foot-long-LED-installation at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, completed in 2010.

Redl’s work is owned by prestigious national and international institutions, among them the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; the Milwaukee Art Museum; and Borusan Contemporary, Istanbul; as well as by private collectors.

The mission of the Chapman Cultural Center is to provide cultural leadership for Greater Spartanburg by developing, strengthening, and promoting the scope, excellence and educational role of the arts, humanities, and sciences, and to further their significance in the life of our community and all of its citizens. Founded in 1968 with a current budget of $2.1 million, the Chapman Cultural Center is the oldest and largest countywide arts agency in the state of South Carolina and is serving as the lead Arts Agency and Project Manager for Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light.

The City of Spartanburg was selected in 2015 as one of four temporary public art projects from across the United States to receive a grant award from the first-ever Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge. Other winning cities are Gary, IN, Spartanburg, SC, and Los Angeles, CA.  Full information on all projects can be found at

Bloomberg Philanthropies works in more than 120 countries around the world to ensure better, longer lives for the greatest number of people. The organization focuses on five key areas for creating lasting change: Arts, Education, Environment, Government Innovation and Public Health. Bloomberg Philanthropies encompasses all of Michael R. Bloomberg’s charitable activities, including his foundation and his personal giving. In 2015, Bloomberg Philanthropies distributed over half a billion dollars.

For more information, please visit ( or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter @BloombergDotOrg.

Columbia Design League Invites You to a Free Lecture at University of South Carolina School of Visual Art and Design in Columbia, SC – Oct. 3, 2016

September 30, 2016


The Columbia Design League has partnered with the University of South Carolina School of Visual Art and Design in Columbia, SC, to offer a free lecture on Monday, Oct. 3, 2016, featuring noted design historian Carma Gorman, PhD. The lecture will begin at 6pm in McMaster College, Room 214 with a reception to follow in McMaster Gallery.

Gorman is associate professor and assistant chair in the Department of Art and Art History (Design Division) at the University of Texas at Austin. An associate editor of the journal Design and Culture and a past president of the Design Studies Forum, she is the author of The Industrial Design Reader, a highly regarded anthology of texts about industrial design. Her book is among those recommended by top design schools in Fastco Design’s “35 Books Every Designer Should Read”.

As part of her discussion, Gorman proposes a new way of defining “American design,” identifies some of its distinctive traits, and argues that the national peculiarities of U.S. design are in many cases direct responses to the globally anomalous characteristics of US laws and standards.

Immediately following the lecture, a reception will be held in McMaster Gallery. The gallery currently features Fingerreisen, an exhibition by Elisabeth Pellathy and Lee Somers. Fingerreisen — a German term for imaginary journeys of the hand and mind — comes to life in their multimedia, map-intensive show.

McMaster College is located at 1615 Senate Street in Columbia, at the corner of Pickens and Senate. Street parking is available around McMaster College on Pickens, Senate and Henderson streets or in the Pendleton Street Garage at visitor meters located on levels 1a, 1b, and 2a at the Pickens Street entrance.

“What’s American about American Design?” is a free lecture and part of the University of South Carolina School of Visual Art and Design’s 2016-17 Visiting Artist/Scholar Series.

Columbia Design League president Wade Sellers believes that the Columbia Design League is more than a leading voice for design in Columbia. “Partnering with the College of Visual Art and Design to host Carma Gorman is part of our continuing mission to bring the best and brightest design voices to Columbia,” he says. “We’re committed to hosting events that bring national design education out of books and magazine articles to our community where members can listen, experience and walk away more informed about design.”

The Columbia Design League is an affiliate group of the Columbia Museum of Art. The group works to educate others about design excellence, emphasize the importance of great design, and to broaden understanding of how good design affects nearly every facet of life. The Design League gathers its membership for an annual series of meetings and welcomes guests and nonmembers with an interest in design. For details, visit ( or follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

The School of Visual Art and Design is within the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of South Carolina. The school encompasses four major areas of study and research: art education, art history, media arts and studio art in programs accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. For details and events, visit the school on Facebook.

For further information contact Julie Smith Turner, Columbia Design League Board Member, Communications Chair, by e-mail at ( or call 803/422-7741.

City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department Calls for Application for Exhibits for July 2017 – June 2018 – Deadline is Nov. 30, 2016

September 30, 2016


Professional visual artists creating two-dimensional or wall-hung three-dimensional works are invited to apply individually or with a group to exhibit at the North Charleston City Gallery in North Charleston, SC. The gallery features artwork by international, national, and local artists in a variety of subjects and media. The City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department manages the exhibitions in the space, which are rotated on a monthly basis and may feature two or more artists concurrently. Exhibits are programmed one year in advance according to fiscal year. A Review Panel will convene in December 2016 to evaluate and select exhibits for July 2017-June 2018. There is no fee to apply. Artists must apply online at ( by Monday, November 30, 2016, in order to be considered.


The North Charleston City Gallery is situated in two corridors of the northwest corner of the Charleston Area Convention Center, located at 5001 Coliseum Drive in North Charleston. This high-traffic venue offers great exposure for artists seeking to reach local patrons and out-of-state visitors of the multi-use facility. Exhibits are open to the public daily and admission and parking are free. Public receptions are typically held the first Thursday of each month from 5-7pm.

Applicants must be at least 18 years old. Only original, two-dimensional works or three-dimensional pieces that can be wall mounted on the gallery’s Walker display system will be considered. Free standing sculptures, installations, and works requiring special display equipment cannot be accommodated in the space. Submission requirements include an artist statement, resume and exhibition history, exhibition concept, and five quality digital images that portray the quality and style of the artists’ work.

Artists not eligible to show their work at the City Gallery, like, for example, those creating freestanding sculptures or installations, are welcome to submit an exhibition proposal to be considered for other locations. Proposals may be e-mailed to ( and will be reviewed by Cultural Arts on an ongoing basis.

For additional information about these and other exhibition opportunities or to learn more about programs and services offered by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department, visit the Arts & Culture section of the City’s website at (, e-mail to (, or call 843/740-5854.

Hub City Empty Bowls Soup Day Slated for Oct. 15, 2016, in Spartanburg, SC

September 30, 2016

Hub City Empty Bowls’s annual Soup Day – a grassroots fundraiser to help feed local hungry people – will be Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016, from 11am-4pm at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC. The public is invited to select handmade pottery bowls and enjoy a wide selection of gourmet soups in exchange for $15 donations. All proceeds go towards feeding the hungry at TOTAL Ministries, a local non-profit, faith-based agency that helps citizens who are facing financial crisis.


Last year, Hub City Empty Bowls donated $26,000 to TOTAL Ministries. Carolina Clay Artists has spearheaded Hub City Empty Bowls since its inception in 2009. Since then, this group of potters has raised tens of thousands of dollars to help feed people in Spartanburg County.

For the past several months at Spartanburg Art Museum’s pottery studio and West Main Artists Co-Op, the general public has been making clay pottery bowls in preparation for Soup Day. Average citizens, as well as trained potters, have made hundreds of bowls at free bowl-making events. Those bowls have been glazed and fired by volunteers and will be displayed in Spartanburg Art Museum at Chapman on Soup Day. The display of hundreds of colorful bowls is an impressive sight. Patrons can select the bowls of their liking in an exchange for $15 donations. Afterward, the patrons may enjoy a simple meal of soup, bread, and tea while enjoying live music and fellowship.


“As much fun is generated during Soup Day, we always want to keep in mind the real reason why we do this,” Bruce Bowyer, Chairman of the event said.

“Latest statistics say that about 15 percent of the people in Spartanburg are what professionals call ‘food insecure.’ Food Insecurity causes 43,000 Spartanburg County residents to struggle with putting food on the table or keeping a roof over a families head. TOTAL Ministries can help relieve the stress of these families by making sure they can put food on the table. The Carolina Clay Artists and all of the many people who help with Empty Bowls do it because we want to make sure everyone has enough food to eat. It really is just that simple.”

“The need in Spartanburg is dire,” Traci Kennedy, Executive Director of TOTAL Ministries, said. “If it weren’t for Hub City Empty Bowls, I don’t know what we do. Carolina Clay Artists is a Godsend. We literally have people lined up outside our door needing food. Our resources are limited, and I hate to admit that we cannot meet the entire need of the community. But thanks to Empty Bowls a lot more people are able to get much needed food. If you’ve never been in the situation of not knowing how you will feed your children, you’ll never fully understand how important Empty Bowls is.”


TOTAL Ministries has become an official organizing partner with Carolina Clay Artists in the annual Hub City Empty Bowls project and the recipient of the proceeds. In past years, the proceeds were donated to various hunger-related agencies.

The soup – donated by local restaurants – will be served in Chapman’s theater lobby, where the music will also be performed. More than two dozen restaurants or food providers have been recruited to donate at least five gallons of soup. Those restaurants are Andre Nguyen, Basil’s Grille, Country Club of Spartanburg, Cribb’s Catering, Cribb’s Kitchen On Main, FATZ Café, Garner’s Cafe, Gerhards Cafe, Hub City Co-Op, Lime Leaf, Lowes, McClellan’s Urban Eatery, Mon Amie Morning Cafe, Moveable Feasts, Nu-Way Restaurant & Lounge, Palmetto Palate, Renato In Centro, Skillet Restaurant, Southern BBQ, Sparks, Sun King Chinese Restaurant, II Samuels Restaurant, Wild Ace’s, and Willy Taco. Donors of bread, tea, and supplies include The Beacon Drive In, Cakehead Bakery, Little River Roasting Co., Long Horn’s, Wade’s Southern Cooking, and Chick-fil-a.

During Soup Day, there will also a silent auction and live music. Collectors take note: the silent auction will feature finely crafted ceramics created by local and regional artists. The musicians donating their talents are Daniel Z, Fayssoux & Brandon, Rick Praytor, Frank Walker, and Mark Miller & Friends. Public drum circles, led by Melisa Emkjer, will be held in the plaza noon-1pm and 2-3pm.

“We are getting down to the wire on this year’s Hub City Empty Bowls’s project,” Bowyer said. “We’ve got the bowls, we’ve got the soup, now we need the people to come and get them.”

The event’s sponsors are Carolina Clay Artists, Spartanburg Art Museum, West Main Artists Co-op, Chapman Cultural Center, Chris Williams, Action Printing, The Healing Arts Fund at Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Milliken, Fairway Outdoor, The Arts Partnership of Greater Spartanburg, and Wheresville Productions. This program is supported in part by The Arts Partnership of Greater Spartanburg, its donors, the County and City of Spartanburg, and the South Carolina Arts Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina. Proceeds from this event will be directed to the Hub City Empty Bowls Project Fund, a component fund of The Spartanburg County Foundation established to increase awareness about the issues of hunger and food security, and to raise funds to help local organizations fight hunger. This year’s beneficiary organization is TOTAL Ministries.

For more information about Bowls Soup Day, please visit ( or call 864/706-3739.

Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg (SC) Event to Raise Money to Mentor Artists, Outreach with Artists Going Live – Oct. 13, 2016

September 30, 2016


Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg in Spartanburg, SC, will hold its 4th annual fundraiser event, Artists Going Live, on Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, at Drayton Mills Lofts. The night will be hosted by WSPA’s Christy Henderson and will feature live painting by local artists and local celebrities. There will be live and silent auctions, food by Cribb’s Kitchen, ARTinis, and much more.

All funds raised will go directly towards promotion of the visual arts locally by hosting collaborative events for professional artists to mentor aspiring artists. The Guild plans to accomplish this by creating a platform for artists to share knowledge about creating, presenting, and promoting themselves and their works. It also plans to use Artists Going Live proceeds to assist outreach programs for educational institutions in the region.

Last year’s event was a large success, raising over $18,000.

When: Oct. 13, from 6:30-9:30pm
Where: Drayton Mills Lofts
Tickets are $50 each and includes all food and beverages
Tickets are available at ( or at the Chapman Center Box Office.

For more information or to support Artists Going Live, please contact Executive Director of Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg Nikki Hicks at 864/764-9568 or e-mail to (