Archive for the ‘SC Visual Arts’ Category

Artist and Creator of National Touring Exhibit “Nature Connects Art with LEGO® Bricks” to Give Talk at Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet, SC – Aug. 6, 2016

July 28, 2016

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Popular New York artist, Sean Kenney, creator of the exhibit “Nature Connects Art with LEGO Bricks” will present a talk at Brookgreen Gardens in Murrells Inlet, SC, on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2016, at noon. The talk is open to the public and is followed by a book signing at Keepsakes, the Brookgreen Shop. Both the talk and the exhibit, “Nature Connects”, are free with garden admission.

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Sean Kenney is a renowned, award-winning artist and “professional kid” who uses LEGO pieces to design and create contemporary sculpture for high-profile clients, major corporations, and venues around the globe for over 10 years.

He has authored 8 best-selling inspirational children’s books, and his award-winning exhibit “Nature Connects” has been breaking attendance records around the world since 2012.

Created in partnership with a state university, “Nature Connects” is foremost an educational platform and secondarily a means of artistic expression.

In describing the exhibit, Kenney said, ”I hope that you can look at ‘Nature Connects’ and appreciate both nature and the sculptures as something beautiful, and I also hope you’re inspired to go home and create something wonderful yourself.”

Brookgreen Gardens, a National Historic Landmark and non-profit organization, is located on US 17 between Murrells Inlet and Pawleys Island, SC, and is open to the public daily.

For more information, visit our web site at (www.brookgreen.org) or call 843/235-6000.

Spartanburg, SC, ArtWalk Under New Management

July 23, 2016

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The Spartanburg, SC, ArtWalk is a free, self-guided art tour of galleries in downtown Spartanburg that takes place the third Thursday of each month from 5-8pm. Spartanburg Art Museum (SAM), Spartanburg’s non-profit contemporary art museum and one of the city’s oldest arts organizations, has recently taken over hosting the event in coordination with 11 local institutional and commercial galleries. The museum has created a new website for ArtWalk that includes information on what’s happening at every participating gallery, updated monthly, and an interactive, downloadable walking map.

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“Spartanburg has an amazing number of thriving galleries and arts-spaces considering its size,” says Mat Duncan, SAM’s Curator of Collections and Community Development Coordinator, “and they’re a huge part of what makes Spartanburg one of South Carolina’s six cultural districts. ArtWalk is a great way for Spartans to connect with what’s happening downtown, but for some time, it has been somewhat unfocused and inconsistent. The new ArtWalk website is the Museum’s first step towards our vision of a new, more organized, and more fun ArtWalk.”

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People listening to a talk at the Spartanburg Art Museum

ArtWalk’s recently renovated website (www.spartanburgartwalk.org) provides resources for those wishing to take the tour, including contact information and monthly updates from participating galleries and a printable map of the event area with locations of participating galleries marked. Maps are also available at Spartanburg Art Museum during ArtWalk.

Spartanburg’s next ArtWalk takes place Thursday, August 18, 2016, from 5-8pm.

For more information or to become a participant visit (www.spartanburgartwalk.org), (www.spartanburgartmuseum.org) or call 864/582-7616 or e-mail the museum at (museum@spartanarts.org).

Fabulon, A Center for Art and Education, LLC, in Charleston, SC, Announces “2016 Juried Fine Art Sculpture Contest with Exhibit and Sale” – Deadline Aug. 30, 2016

July 17, 2016

Fabulon Gallery represents a diverse group of artists working with a variety of mediums in traditional and non traditional ways. Fabulon seeks new and exciting fine art in 3-D. The theme is literally wide open,  artists may choose to explore any theme but must provide a statement that connects the words to the visual.

Criteria:

Sculptures will be judged on technical ability, craftsmanship, use of materials, execution of theme and ability of the artist to tie the statement to the work. All sculptures must be original and for sale.

Eligibility:

Artists of the Carolinas and GA.

All mediums accepted.

Indoor, outdoor, and scale models considered.

Minimum age: 18

Resident of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.

Artist should be able to be present at the reception.

Entry Procedure:·

Submit 1 image of the sculpture you are entering in the contest.

Add 2 close up images showing details of this sculpture.

Include 2 separate images that represent the body of your work in general.

Submit an artist statement that explains the theme and process of your project.

Notate materials used and provide dimensions of finished product.

Please follow the labeling procedure found on the website.

Images must be received by 8/30

$25 Submission Fee

Judging:

All applicants will be reviewed by a panel of working artists and art education professionals. Artists not accepted for this show will be notified with a brief commentary as to why their work was not chosen. All entries will be saved for future consideration.

Prizes:

1st Place: $500

2nd Place: $200

3rd Place: $150

People’s Choice Award: $100

2 Honorable Mention Prizes

Winners will be announced at the show and prizes will be awarded that night.

Deadline & Important Dates:

Submission Deadline: 8/30

Acceptance Announced: 9/6

Drop off and meeting: 10/8

Show: 10/14 to 11/1

Reception: 10/14, 5-8:30pm

Retrieval: 11/5

For further information visit (www.fabulonart.com), e-mail to (fabulon.art@gmail.com) or call 843/566-3383.

Lancaster Performing Arts in Lancaster, SC, Calls for Entries for Red Rose Film Festival – Deadline Oct. 18, 2016

July 17, 2016

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Lancaster Performing Arts “See Lancaster Live” series announces the Red Rose Film Festival, debuting November 18, 2016, at 7pm in USC Lancaster’s Bundy Auditorium in Lancaster, SC.  Filmmakers of all ages are encouraged to submit entries by October 18, 2016, for this fun competition in which all scenes must be filmed in Lancaster county. Films are also required to incorporate at least one red rose, symbolic of the Red Rose City of Lancaster, SC.

Family-friendly films in DVD format must be no more than ten minutes in length and $15 application fee should be included with submission. Ten films will be chosen to be shown at the November 18th Red Rose Film Festival where winners will be announced for first, second, third places and people’s choice.

Tickets to the film festival are $5 each and may be purchased at the door or in advance by visiting (http://www.lancastercitysc.com/performingarts.aspx). A complete list of rules and application to submit films can also be found at the ticket link or contact April Joplin, Performing Arts Manager by calling 803/285-1145 or e-mail to (p.arts@lancastercitysc.com).

Applications are available at the Springs House, 201 West Gay Street, Lancaster, SC 29720.

A Trip to Charleston, SC, When the Temps Were Over 100 Degrees to Pay Respect to a Gutsy Artist – Dr. Leo Twiggs

July 15, 2016

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Last Friday, on July 8, 2016, I traveled down to Charleston, SC, from the headquarters of Shoestring Publishing Company in Bonneau, SC, to go to a reception for the exhibit, Requiem for Mother Emanuel, featuring nine works by Dr. Leo Twiggs, on view at the City Gallery at Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Waterfront Park, through July 31, 2016. It was already 100 degrees when I left the house. Going to Charleston was the last thing I wanted to do that afternoon, but I had to. It was a matter of paying respect to an artist who well deserved it. Later on, the heat index would reach 110 and it felt like every bit of that and more.

I first met Dr. Twiggs at a special lunch set up by the Gibbes Museum of Art, back in the 90’s when they were showing an exhibit of photographs by W. Eugene Smith on his landmark photo essay, ‘Nurse Midwife’ Maude Callen, published in LIFE magazine in Dec. 1951. Back then I was still known as “somebody” in the Charleston photography community and I lived in Berkeley County where Maude Callen did her work. Dr. Twiggs was from St. Stephens, SC, in Berkeley County where Callan operated out of a small clinic.

I’ve never really talked with Dr. Twiggs since, but we have covered many an exhibit of his works throughout the years at institutional art spaces and commercial galleries in our publications South Carolina Arts and now Carolina Arts. In fact I loved every opportunity we got to show one of his works with the Confederate battle flag in it. I truly enjoy publishing works by a black man using that flag as a recurring symbol in his art.

And just like any day I go anywhere outside the area I live in, on Friday as I left to go to Charleston I had to drive past four Confederate flags flying in people’s front yards in my neighborhood.

I have no personal connection to the Civil War so it shouldn’t matter to me whether that flag flies anywhere, but I’ve grown to hate what it stands for today. Don’t give me that line about heritage – I’m not buying it. When I first arrived in SC I would often get asked which side my family was on – North or South. Being from Michigan, many assumed I was one of those carpetbaggin’ Yankees, but my relatives weren’t even in the US when the Civil War took place. They where trying to get out from under the boots of Russian Czars and British rulers and they didn’t make it out until after the turn of the century.

I’ve lived in South Carolina for 42 years and I never thought that the Confederate flag would come down off the SC State House grounds, much less the State House, but a stupid kid who thought he was a Johnny Reb who killed nine people while they were at a bible study class brought it down. Who would have thought that? Not me.

I’m not going to go into what’s behind Dr. Twiggs work or the work in this exhibit, the gallery has a film you can watch about that and a nice exhibit catalog which you can read his words on his work. You don’t need to hear my interpretation. But you should go see this exhibit.

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Here’s some information the gallery provided about this exhibition: Requiem for Mother Emanuel brings together nine new works by Leo Twiggs, created in commemoration of the nine victims who lost their lives on June 17, 2015 at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. A video produced exclusively for this exhibition will feature the personal commentary of Twiggs, who shares his artistic vision and gives tribute to the extreme grace displayed by the Mother Emanuel family.

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“This series has been the most difficult I have ever done,” says Leo Twiggs. “Some of the members of Mother Emanuel are close to my family. No series has been more painful or personal. I want people to look at my works and know that something tragic happened in a Church . . .  that a horrible thing happened in a Church that changed lives. My paintings are testimonies to the nine who were slain. But I also record another moment: our state’s greatest moment . . . a response that moved us from tragedy to redemption. For one shining moment we looked at each other not as different races but as human beings. From the City Gallery I can see the docks where the ships came in carrying my ancestors. Through the decades many of them worshiped at Mother Emanuel. Hopefully, we will not forget but will remember that moment that brought us all together.”

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Dr. Leo Twiggs (center)

One of the symbols that Twiggs has used in his paintings since the 1970’s is the Confederate Flag. The flag becomes a reoccurring symbol in the Requiem series as it is splashed across the surface of the Church. The flag morphs from a recognizable symbol to a disintegrating form that becomes a cross on a blood stained background and then changes to a cross with the red drained from it. The target and the symbol nine also appear in this series. There is a definite visual transition in the sixth painting as Twiggs recalls the afternoon he entered the Church and stood in front of the stained glass window.

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People watching a film about Dr Twiggs and this exhibit.

I also want to mention that this exhibit was made possible with the help of the Hampton III Gallery in Taylors, SC, (Greenville area) that is one of the galleries in SC which represents Dr. Twiggs’ work. Also, if you don’t live in the Charleston area or can’t get there in time to see this exhibit, that I understand it will be traveling to other parts of SC. Stay tuned into to Carolina Arts for more info on that.

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Dr. Twiggs giving a short talk at the reception.

As I mentioned in a Facebook post after attending the reception, the crowd there was a Who’s Who of the SC visual art community. The director of the SC Arts Commission and staff members where there, City of Charleston officials and staff members, institutional and commercial gallery owners and directors, artists, and other folks involved in the visual arts, as well as members of the Mother Emanuel family. They were all there to pay respect to one of SC’s most talented artist and one who was not afraid to use symbols of SC’s racial history in his works.

Now you can go and pay your respects to the artist and see the works he made in commemoration of the nine victims.

The City Gallery at Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Waterfront Park is located at 34 Prioleau Street in downtown Charleston, SC, and gallery hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday, 10am until 6pm, Saturday and Sunday, noon until 5pm.

For more information and holiday closures, visit (www.charleston-sc.gov/citygallery) or call 843/958-6484.

Founding Director of The Johnson Collection, in Spartanburg, SC, David Henderson, Retires

July 12, 2016

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In the beginning, there were 200 paintings—and the firm conviction that fine art of the South deserved a larger role on the stage of American art. Since that time in 2002, the Johnson Collection has grown to encompass 1,200 objects and has been lauded for having staged a “quiet art historical revolution” and expanding “the meaning of regional” by “The Magazine Antiques”. As the collection’s founding director, David Henderson guided that growth and ever-expanding vision. After fourteen years in this seminal role, Henderson announced his retirement effective July 1, 2016.

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Working in close collaboration with the Johnson family, Henderson established the collection’s curatorial framework and acquisition strategy. He also launched the collection’s ambitious publication and exhibition initiatives, building partnerships with museums and scholars across the country. “David’s passion for Southern art and history has been a catalyst for the collection since its formation. His expertise and keen understanding of the market have been an invaluable resource, and we are grateful for his leadership these many years,” stated George D. Johnson, Jr.

Fine art is a second vocation for Henderson, who retired early from a successful business career and then devoted himself to a burgeoning interest in Southern art. His own sizeable collection of works now forms the foundation of holdings represented by his family enterprise, H + K Gallery, to which Henderson, 73, will now dedicate more of his time. Henderson describes his tenure with the Johnson Collection as a “tremendous privilege that brought me great joy. The Johnson family’s commitment to the advancement of Southern art is unprecedented; working with George and Susu to shape the collection was an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that I value beyond measure.”

Located in Spartanburg, SC, the Johnson Collection offers an extensive survey of artistic activity in the American South from the late eighteenth century to the present day. In May 2016, the collection received the Governor’s Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award for the Arts, South Carolina’s highest honor in the field.

Complete information on TJC’s mission and current initiatives can be found on the collection’s website at (www.thejohnsoncollection.org).

Hub City Empty Bowls 2016 Aims to Feed Local Hungry Citizens in Spartanburg, SC

July 12, 2016

Hub City Empty Bowls anticipates another great art-based campaign in 2016 to feed the hungry people in Spartanburg County, SC, and invites everyone to make hand-crafted pottery bowls at free public events this summer. The finished bowls will be used for the annual Soup Day fundraiser in the autumn. This year, there will be three bowl-making opportunities for public participation: Saturday, July 16, 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s studios at Chapman Cultural Center; Thursday, July 21, 6-8:30pm at West Main Artists Co-Op; and Saturday, Aug. 27, 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s studios at Chapman Cultural Center. The Soup Day fundraiser will be Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016, 11am-4pm at Chapman Cultural Center.  The food pantry at TOTAL Ministries will receive the proceeds from the fundraiser to help feed the needy in Spartanburg County.

According to a 2016 report by County Health Rankings & Roadmaps by University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, 15 percent of Spartanburg’s population – that’s 42,980 people – is “food insecure.” In Greenville County, the percentage is 14. The lowest ranking county in the state is Lexington with 12 percent, and the highest ranking county is Allendale with 28 percent. Overall, 17 percent of the people in South Carolina “lack adequate access to food.”

“We might not be the worst county in South Carolina with a hunger problem,” Traci Kennedy, Director of TOTAL Ministries, said. “But 42,980 is a lot of people – our friends and neighbors – who don’t have enough to eat. For children it is even worse. 22.5 percent of the children in Spartanburg – almost one out of every four – is going hungry. It is TOTAL Ministries’ mission to help feed the hungry, and thanks to Hub City Empty Bowls, we are making headway. I just pray we have another good turnout of people to make the bowls and then have them and their friends come back on Soup Day to make donations, take the bowls home, eat some truly wonderful soup, and take comfort in knowing they have helped someone in need.” TOTAL Ministries has an annual budget of about $300,000, normally helps more than 4,500 households each year.

But first, you need to make pottery bowls. Bowl-making events provide a unique opportunity for members of the community to experience the pleasure of working with clay at no cost and at any level of experience, including no experience. The clay, facilities, and instruction are all donated.  Members of Carolina Clay Artists and volunteers will be on hand to instruct participants in the techniques of bowl-making.  Many of the bowls will be simple and primitive, which has a beauty all of its own. Some participants are experienced potters, who make their bowls on pottery wheels, often producing professional-grade bowls. The events are open to anyone willing to give of their time and effort, and make for wholesome and free family activities. The bowls are left at the studios and are later glazed and fired by experienced volunteers.

“People look forward to our bowl-making events every year,” Nancy Williamson, publicity leader on behalf of Carolina Clay Artists, said. “I see some of the same faces and families come back each year. It’s fun, easy, creative, free, and, of course, it is for a good cause. I am truly amazed at some of the raw talent I is see. Even more amazing is to see all the finished bowls laid out on Soup Day for the public to take home. It’s almost like an art exhibit – a huge art exhibit with every color of the rainbow and shape imaginable.”

Proceeds from last year’s campaign allowed Hub City Empty Bowls to make an all-time high donation of $26,000 to TOTAL Ministries, a faith-based organization with a primary mission of helping the financially disadvantaged citizens of the community. Most of the money was raised on Soup Day, when citizens would receive the handmade bowls by donating $15. As part of the festive occasion, local restaurants donated gourmet soup that the donors could enjoy, along with live music and fellowship. 2016 marks the eighth year that Carolina Clay Artists has spearheaded the local effort of the internationally successful Empty Bowls concept of feeding the needy through the creation of pottery bowls.

On Soup Day, the hundreds of finished and colorful bowls will be displayed in Spartanburg Art Museum at Chapman Cultural Center. For every $15 donation, the donor gets to keep a bowl of his or her choice and enjoy a simple meal of soup, bread, and tea, served in Chapman’s theater lobby. Along the perimeter of the lobby will be various serving stations set up by local restaurants that donate a wide selection of soups to the occasion. Patrons can enjoy soups from some of the best restaurants in Spartanburg, while dining under a large canopy set up in the outdoor plaza, and enjoy listening to live music and sharing in the fellowship of knowing they are helping feed citizens in the local community. A silent auction of donated items also takes place as another means of raising money. The tradition of having a drum circle in the lobby or plaza will continue this year.

Empty Bowls was started by a high school teacher in Michigan in 1990 as a high school student project to help feed the needy and has grown into an international phenomenon.  There are hundreds of Empty Bowls projects around the world, raising millions of dollars to feed the hungry. Each Empty Bowls organization is independent and self-governed.

Thus far, this year’s sponsors are Spartanburg Regional Foundation Healing Arts Fund, Carolina Clay Artists, West Main Artists Co-Op, Action Printing, Milliken & Company, Wheresville Productions, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg Art Museum, and Chris Williams. The project is still seeking more sponsors: companies and individuals willing to donate funds; restaurants to donate soup, bread, and tea; other businesses to donate eating utensils, such as paper cups, plastic spoon, and napkins; individuals and businesses to donate silent auction items; and potters to make the bowls.  Those willing to donate should contact Traci Kennedy by e-mail at (Director@TotalMinistries.org) or call 864/585-9167. For more information about TOTAL Ministries please visit (www.TotalMinistries.org).

Hub City Empty Bowls is a component fund of the Spartanburg County Foundation. It was established to increase awareness about the issues of hunger and food insecurity, and to help local organizations fight hunger.  For more information, please visit online at (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com). For the latest information on Hub City Empty Bowls, please like the organization on Facebook.

Greenville Center for Creative Arts in Greenville, SC, Offers Lecture Series with Ann Hicks – July 12, 2016

July 12, 2016

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On July 12, 2016, at 6 pm, visit Greenville Center for Creative Arts (GCCA) in Greenville, SC, and spend an evening with Ann Hicks as she shares her story of starting life as a Hungarian refugee to the revered “Greenville News” art critic for 11 years.

The event is free and open to the public, no RSVP needed.

Come early and enjoy the full gallery exhibit “Telling Her Story” showcasing 11 women with ties to Greenville. Daydreams, questions of identity, motherhood, cultural stereotypes, nature, and technology are some of the themes interpreted in the artwork.  Many materials are represented, including textiles, ceramics, paint, papers and collected objects.

Please take time to become a Member of GCCA or renew your membership today. As a new organization, we rely on our membership dollars to bring high quality visual arts programming to Greenville.

For further info call 864/735-3948 or visit (www.artcentergreenville.org)

University of South Carolina in Columbia, SC, Offers “MFA Summer Exhibition”

July 12, 2016

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The University of South Carolina in Columbia, SC, is presenting “MFA Summer Exhibition”, on view in the McMaster Gallery, through July 29, 2016.

The exhibition includes work by Jamie Berry, Jeremy Bickford, Allison Dunavant, Julie Hamer, Josh Knight, Marcella Kuykendall, Chad Penner, Sylvia Ady-Potts, Edmari Hernandez-Silen, John Henry Tecklenburg, and Cody Unkart.

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This exhibition is a survey of works by current graduate students entering their 2nd and 3rd year of the Master of Fine Arts program at the University of South Carolina’s School of Visual Art and Design. The wide variety of works include: drawing, installation, painting, sculpture, and video.

McMaster Gallery is located in the University of South Carolina’s School of Visual Art and Design at 1615 Senate Street, Columbia, SC, with accessible street parking on Pickens, Senate, and Henderson.

The gallery is free and open to the public and the hours are Monday – Friday 9am – 4:30pm (closed weekends and all university holidays)

For more information contact: Shannon Rae Lindsey, Gallery Director by e-mail at (slindsey@email.sc.edu) or phone 803/777-5752.

Call for Entries for the 2016 South Carolina State Fair Competitions in Columbia, SC – Deadline Sept. 1, 2016

July 12, 2016

Are You Blue Ribbon Worthy?

The South Carolina State Fair in Columbia, SC, is excited to announce the official call for entry registrations for the 2016 Competitive Exhibits. A state fair wouldn’t be complete without competition pies, quilts, paintings, giant pumpkins, and everyone’s favorite animals. Every year at the SC State Fair, the community’s gardeners, bakers, farmers and artisans of all ages and types come together to share their talents with half a million Fair-goers. Enter into a competition to win a coveted blue ribbon and part of the $300,000+ offered in premiums and awards.

Competitive Exhibits Include*:
·Fine Art
·Student Art
·Agriculture
·Flowers
·Home & Craft Department

* These particular competitions are limited to South Carolina residents and out-of-state students attending a South Carolina school of higher learning.

The Livestock Departments are open to everyone for participation, regardless of place of residency.

Competitive Livestock Exhibits include:
·Cattle
·Dairy Goat
·Sheep
·Smallstock
·Swine
·Youth Horse
·4-H/FFA Meat Goat

All competitions require pre-registration which is open now through Sept. 1, 2016. To complete a registration form, please visit the South Carolina State Fair website at (www.scstatefair.org). If you have questions or need additional information, please contact us by e-mail at (geninfo@scstatefair.org).

The 2016 South Carolina State Fair runs from October 12 – 23 at the Fairgrounds on Rosewood Drive and George Rogers Blvd. in Columbia.

The South Carolina State Fair is a self-supported, charitable organization dedicated to educating South Carolina’s young adults, with over $300,000 in scholarships awarded annually. For more information about the South Carolina State Fair, its programs or licensing opportunities, contact Nancy Smith at 803/799-3387 ext. 116 or e-mail to (nancys@scstatefair.org) or visit (www.SCStateFair.org).


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