Archive for the ‘Spartanburg SC Visual Arts’ Category

Spartanburg, SC, ArtWalk Under New Management

July 23, 2016

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The Spartanburg, SC, ArtWalk is a free, self-guided art tour of galleries in downtown Spartanburg that takes place the third Thursday of each month from 5-8pm. Spartanburg Art Museum (SAM), Spartanburg’s non-profit contemporary art museum and one of the city’s oldest arts organizations, has recently taken over hosting the event in coordination with 11 local institutional and commercial galleries. The museum has created a new website for ArtWalk that includes information on what’s happening at every participating gallery, updated monthly, and an interactive, downloadable walking map.

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“Spartanburg has an amazing number of thriving galleries and arts-spaces considering its size,” says Mat Duncan, SAM’s Curator of Collections and Community Development Coordinator, “and they’re a huge part of what makes Spartanburg one of South Carolina’s six cultural districts. ArtWalk is a great way for Spartans to connect with what’s happening downtown, but for some time, it has been somewhat unfocused and inconsistent. The new ArtWalk website is the Museum’s first step towards our vision of a new, more organized, and more fun ArtWalk.”

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People listening to a talk at the Spartanburg Art Museum

ArtWalk’s recently renovated website (www.spartanburgartwalk.org) provides resources for those wishing to take the tour, including contact information and monthly updates from participating galleries and a printable map of the event area with locations of participating galleries marked. Maps are also available at Spartanburg Art Museum during ArtWalk.

Spartanburg’s next ArtWalk takes place Thursday, August 18, 2016, from 5-8pm.

For more information or to become a participant visit (www.spartanburgartwalk.org), (www.spartanburgartmuseum.org) or call 864/582-7616 or e-mail the museum at (museum@spartanarts.org).

Founding Director of The Johnson Collection, in Spartanburg, SC, David Henderson, Retires

July 12, 2016

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In the beginning, there were 200 paintings—and the firm conviction that fine art of the South deserved a larger role on the stage of American art. Since that time in 2002, the Johnson Collection has grown to encompass 1,200 objects and has been lauded for having staged a “quiet art historical revolution” and expanding “the meaning of regional” by “The Magazine Antiques”. As the collection’s founding director, David Henderson guided that growth and ever-expanding vision. After fourteen years in this seminal role, Henderson announced his retirement effective July 1, 2016.

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Working in close collaboration with the Johnson family, Henderson established the collection’s curatorial framework and acquisition strategy. He also launched the collection’s ambitious publication and exhibition initiatives, building partnerships with museums and scholars across the country. “David’s passion for Southern art and history has been a catalyst for the collection since its formation. His expertise and keen understanding of the market have been an invaluable resource, and we are grateful for his leadership these many years,” stated George D. Johnson, Jr.

Fine art is a second vocation for Henderson, who retired early from a successful business career and then devoted himself to a burgeoning interest in Southern art. His own sizeable collection of works now forms the foundation of holdings represented by his family enterprise, H + K Gallery, to which Henderson, 73, will now dedicate more of his time. Henderson describes his tenure with the Johnson Collection as a “tremendous privilege that brought me great joy. The Johnson family’s commitment to the advancement of Southern art is unprecedented; working with George and Susu to shape the collection was an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that I value beyond measure.”

Located in Spartanburg, SC, the Johnson Collection offers an extensive survey of artistic activity in the American South from the late eighteenth century to the present day. In May 2016, the collection received the Governor’s Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award for the Arts, South Carolina’s highest honor in the field.

Complete information on TJC’s mission and current initiatives can be found on the collection’s website at (www.thejohnsoncollection.org).

Hub City Empty Bowls 2016 Aims to Feed Local Hungry Citizens in Spartanburg, SC

July 12, 2016

Hub City Empty Bowls anticipates another great art-based campaign in 2016 to feed the hungry people in Spartanburg County, SC, and invites everyone to make hand-crafted pottery bowls at free public events this summer. The finished bowls will be used for the annual Soup Day fundraiser in the autumn. This year, there will be three bowl-making opportunities for public participation: Saturday, July 16, 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s studios at Chapman Cultural Center; Thursday, July 21, 6-8:30pm at West Main Artists Co-Op; and Saturday, Aug. 27, 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s studios at Chapman Cultural Center. The Soup Day fundraiser will be Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016, 11am-4pm at Chapman Cultural Center.  The food pantry at TOTAL Ministries will receive the proceeds from the fundraiser to help feed the needy in Spartanburg County.

According to a 2016 report by County Health Rankings & Roadmaps by University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, 15 percent of Spartanburg’s population – that’s 42,980 people – is “food insecure.” In Greenville County, the percentage is 14. The lowest ranking county in the state is Lexington with 12 percent, and the highest ranking county is Allendale with 28 percent. Overall, 17 percent of the people in South Carolina “lack adequate access to food.”

“We might not be the worst county in South Carolina with a hunger problem,” Traci Kennedy, Director of TOTAL Ministries, said. “But 42,980 is a lot of people – our friends and neighbors – who don’t have enough to eat. For children it is even worse. 22.5 percent of the children in Spartanburg – almost one out of every four – is going hungry. It is TOTAL Ministries’ mission to help feed the hungry, and thanks to Hub City Empty Bowls, we are making headway. I just pray we have another good turnout of people to make the bowls and then have them and their friends come back on Soup Day to make donations, take the bowls home, eat some truly wonderful soup, and take comfort in knowing they have helped someone in need.” TOTAL Ministries has an annual budget of about $300,000, normally helps more than 4,500 households each year.

But first, you need to make pottery bowls. Bowl-making events provide a unique opportunity for members of the community to experience the pleasure of working with clay at no cost and at any level of experience, including no experience. The clay, facilities, and instruction are all donated.  Members of Carolina Clay Artists and volunteers will be on hand to instruct participants in the techniques of bowl-making.  Many of the bowls will be simple and primitive, which has a beauty all of its own. Some participants are experienced potters, who make their bowls on pottery wheels, often producing professional-grade bowls. The events are open to anyone willing to give of their time and effort, and make for wholesome and free family activities. The bowls are left at the studios and are later glazed and fired by experienced volunteers.

“People look forward to our bowl-making events every year,” Nancy Williamson, publicity leader on behalf of Carolina Clay Artists, said. “I see some of the same faces and families come back each year. It’s fun, easy, creative, free, and, of course, it is for a good cause. I am truly amazed at some of the raw talent I is see. Even more amazing is to see all the finished bowls laid out on Soup Day for the public to take home. It’s almost like an art exhibit – a huge art exhibit with every color of the rainbow and shape imaginable.”

Proceeds from last year’s campaign allowed Hub City Empty Bowls to make an all-time high donation of $26,000 to TOTAL Ministries, a faith-based organization with a primary mission of helping the financially disadvantaged citizens of the community. Most of the money was raised on Soup Day, when citizens would receive the handmade bowls by donating $15. As part of the festive occasion, local restaurants donated gourmet soup that the donors could enjoy, along with live music and fellowship. 2016 marks the eighth year that Carolina Clay Artists has spearheaded the local effort of the internationally successful Empty Bowls concept of feeding the needy through the creation of pottery bowls.

On Soup Day, the hundreds of finished and colorful bowls will be displayed in Spartanburg Art Museum at Chapman Cultural Center. For every $15 donation, the donor gets to keep a bowl of his or her choice and enjoy a simple meal of soup, bread, and tea, served in Chapman’s theater lobby. Along the perimeter of the lobby will be various serving stations set up by local restaurants that donate a wide selection of soups to the occasion. Patrons can enjoy soups from some of the best restaurants in Spartanburg, while dining under a large canopy set up in the outdoor plaza, and enjoy listening to live music and sharing in the fellowship of knowing they are helping feed citizens in the local community. A silent auction of donated items also takes place as another means of raising money. The tradition of having a drum circle in the lobby or plaza will continue this year.

Empty Bowls was started by a high school teacher in Michigan in 1990 as a high school student project to help feed the needy and has grown into an international phenomenon.  There are hundreds of Empty Bowls projects around the world, raising millions of dollars to feed the hungry. Each Empty Bowls organization is independent and self-governed.

Thus far, this year’s sponsors are Spartanburg Regional Foundation Healing Arts Fund, Carolina Clay Artists, West Main Artists Co-Op, Action Printing, Milliken & Company, Wheresville Productions, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg Art Museum, and Chris Williams. The project is still seeking more sponsors: companies and individuals willing to donate funds; restaurants to donate soup, bread, and tea; other businesses to donate eating utensils, such as paper cups, plastic spoon, and napkins; individuals and businesses to donate silent auction items; and potters to make the bowls.  Those willing to donate should contact Traci Kennedy by e-mail at (Director@TotalMinistries.org) or call 864/585-9167. For more information about TOTAL Ministries please visit (www.TotalMinistries.org).

Hub City Empty Bowls is a component fund of the Spartanburg County Foundation. It was established to increase awareness about the issues of hunger and food insecurity, and to help local organizations fight hunger.  For more information, please visit online at (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com). For the latest information on Hub City Empty Bowls, please like the organization on Facebook.

Mayo Mac Boggs Sculpture on Display at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC

May 30, 2016

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Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, has received the modern stainless steel sculpture — “Chariot” — made by the late Mayo Mac Boggs, one of Spartanburg and South Carolina’s most noted artists. It is now proudly displayed on Chapman’s campus, thanks to the artist’s widow Ansley Boggs, Ed.D., an education professor at Converse College.

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Created in 2005, the piece was first named “Constellation” by Boggs. However, in 2010, during Boggs’ “40th year Retrospective Exhibition” on the college campuses of Converse, Wofford, and USC-Upstate, he redubbed it “Chariot”. In recent years, the piece has been showcased at USC-Upstate’s library. Boggs passed away in March 2014.

Boggs had a long and celebrated career in the arts, after humble beginnings as the son of a welder in a Kentucky industrial city. In addition to his more than 40 years of teaching art at Converse College, he kept an active and productive career in creating art. Some of his noted achievements include receiving a 2013 Verner Award, the highest art award given in South Carolina; being named “Professor Emeritus of Art” by Converse College in 2013; and being named “Honorary Artist of Spartanburg” in 1991. Boggs’ art is placed in the Presidential Libraries of Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter. His work is located also internationally in permanent collections of numerous corporations. In addition, he has received many sculpture commissions for city parks, public libraries, college campuses, schools, local businesses, and private residences, one of which was for the home of author Lillian Jackson Braun.

In regards to his inspiration and preferred medium, Boggs once said, “The welded steel sculpture has remained a constant as my medium of expression. I love the look, feel, taste, smell and sound of steel. My great-grandfather was a blacksmith in Kentucky; both my grandfathers and my father were welders and steelworkers. I grew up watching steel pouring from the blast furnaces and the nightly spectacular display of slag being dumped from huge, railroad-sized crucibles. I walked the railroad tracks and picked up scrap metal that had fallen from freight cars. The ironworker’s material and process were an everyday part of my childhood in Ashland, KY. I have taken this material and its process and made art, continuing a family tradition of ironwork.”

In his artist statement, dated March 2011, he wrote: “There are many things one can do to occupy his time while on this earth. I prefer to have non-verbal conversations with my soul. My art is the residue.”

“Chariot” can be viewed daily at Chapman Cultural Center.

For further info contact Steve Wong, Marketing Director, Chapman Cultural Center by calling 864/278-9698 or e-mail to (sWong@SpartanArts.org).

Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, Receives Hayes Sculpture for Public Display

May 21, 2016

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For public display, Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, has received a painted-steel nonobjective sculpture by the noted artist David Hayes. The multisided sculpture is painted in bright primary colors and sits at the entrance of Chapman’s theater. It is on permanent loan from an anonymous patron.

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Hayes, 1931-2013, was an American sculptor noted for pioneering sculptures in metal and for his work’s graceful curves, shapes abstracted from sketches of objects and ideas. His earlier works were usually black, however, early in this century, he began adding bright and bold colors to his work, which became his iconic style. The unnamed piece at Chapman is a fine example of his later work.

Hayes’s work is sought after around the world and displayed in the most prestigious galleries, such as the Museum of Modern Art, Guggenheim Museum, and Smithsonian American Art Museum.

In reference to his work, Hayes once said: “Each sculpture begins with the ink and gouache drawings that I do each day. The forms and shapes, and their interaction, are delineated on paper, with the color showing each different form. The drawings themselves are derived from copious notebooks of sketches that I make to depict objects and shapes that I respond to in nature and the environment around me. Later they are painted with several coats of primer and weather resistant colors. The coloration of the pieces is determined by what I see in the shapes themselves. And though the pieces have individual titles, I leave the interpretation of each to the realm of the viewer’s imagination. The sculptures are out in the open and can be viewed under different weather and light conditions as they are all made for out of door exposure. I have a strong conviction about art in public areas where it can be seen and enjoyed in uninhibiting surroundings.”

The Hayes sculpture at Chapman can be viewed daily. For extensive information about Hayes, please visit his website at (www.DavidHayes.com).

Phifer-Johnson Foundation/The Johnson Collection Receives State’s Highest Art Award – Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award

May 12, 2016

The Phifer-Johnson Foundation/The Johnson Collection has been named the recipient of the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner 2016 Business/Foundation Award, by the South Carolina Arts Commission. The Johnson Foundation was nominated by Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC.

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The Johnsons with Gov. Haley

The Johnson Foundation received the award Wednesday, May 11, 2016, at a ceremony at the Statehouse in Columbia, SC. The Foundation received a handcrafted bronze statue, designed by Columbia-based artist Jean McWhorter.

The Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Awards recognize outstanding achievement and contributions to the arts in South Carolina, and are the highest honor the state gives in the arts. These awards honor South Carolina arts organizations, patrons, artists, members of the business community, and government entities who maximize their roles as innovators, supporters and advocates of the arts. In 1980, the Verner Awards took on a special significance with their designation as the official “Governor’s Awards for the Arts.”

“On behalf of Chapman Cultural Center’s artists and patrons, we are thrilled that the Johnsons have been recognized as leaders in the supports of the arts, not only in Spartanburg, but through out South Carolina, the South, and the nation,” Chapman President and CEO Jennifer Evins said. “Over the years, the Johnsons have supported the arts with their wisdom, influence, resources, and time. We can never thank them enough. Receiving this award speaks to the world-class appreciation of and commitment to the arts that the Johnsons have.”

When Susu and George Johnson’s personal art collection outgrew their home and office space, they decided to share it. What began as an interest in paintings by Carolina artists in 2002 has grown to encompass over 1,200 objects that chronicle the cultural evolution of the American South. Three scholarly books have been published around the Johnson Collection’s holdings. Each of the books is accompanied by a touring exhibition that travels to leading museums in South Carolina and across the South for two to four years. In contrast to most touring shows, the Johnsons share these exhibitions with all participating museums at no cost. These efforts to provide broad access to the arts for free have attracted national attention from such prominent publications as “American Art Review”, “The Magazine Antiques” and “Garden & Gun”. A website for the collection features images and notes on hundreds of Southern artists and a searchable catalog of the collection’s library of over 4,000 volumes. The collection’s curator serves as a visiting scholar and lecturer at local colleges, and students are invited to apply for curatorial internships. A gallery in downtown Spartanburg presents regular exhibitions from the collection and loans artwork to a variety of public and educational institutions, making the collection highly accessible to the public.

The Johnsons’ philanthropic commitment to community, arts and culture extends beyond the Johnson Collection to support local and statewide arts programs and initiatives. The Phifer-Johnson Foundation is a major benefactor of the South Carolina First Novel Prize, which is establishing a national profile for South Carolina’s most promising writers. They have been important to the success of Spartanburg’s Chapman Cultural Center, a centerpiece in Spartanburg’s active cultural scene. They are key supporters of arts organizations and activities that add vibrancy and attract youth and talent to their community, including the Hub-Bub Artist in Residence Program, Ballet Spartanburg, the Music Foundation of Spartanburg, Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Brookgreen Gardens, and more. Equally dedicated to arts advancement and arts accessibility, the Johnsons generously share their vision, energy, passion and resources to benefit the arts in South Carolina.

Elizabeth O’Neill Verner achieved an international reputation for her etchings and pastels, many of which capture the spirit of the South Carolina Lowcountry. She was also a teacher, writer and historian. Throughout her 96 years, Mrs. Verner traveled abroad extensively. Drawings of South Carolina residences, churches and street-life portraits are Verner trademarks recognized throughout the world for the way they capture South Carolina’s unique people and architecture. Mrs. Verner’s studio is located on Tradd Street in Charleston, SC.

Other 2016 Verner Awards include Charleston artist Mary Edna Fraser, Executive Director of the South Carolina Arts Alliance Betty Plumb, arts education agency Joye In Aiken, government agency The City of Greenville, and arts organization The Columbia Museum of Art. Special recognition was given to Hootie and the Blowfish, and writer/poet Nikky Finney.

For further info call Steve Wong, Marketing Director, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg, SC. at 864/278-9698 or e-mail to (sWong@SpartanArts.org).

USC Upstate in Spartanburg, SC, to Display Award-winning Photos from Annual Audubon Society Competition on Thursday, Apr. 21, 2016

April 15, 2016

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The University of South Carolina Upstate is proud to present a special exhibit featuring 10 award-winning photographs from the 2015 Audubon Photography Awards on Thursday, April 21 during Spartanburg, SC’s monthly Art Walk event.

The exhibit, which is free to the public, will be on display from 5 – 8pm at the George Dean Johnson, Jr. College of Business and Economics located at 160 E. St. John Street in downtown Spartanburg.

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“Great Egret” by Melissa Groo 2015 Audubon Photography Contest winner.

The sixth annual photo contest featured more than 9,000 entries from 2,300 participants submitting images in several categories, including Amateur, Professional, Fine Art and Youth.

This exhibit is sponsored by the USC Upstate galleries.

For more information, contact Jane Nodine, director of the USC Upstate galleries, at 864/503-5838 or e-mail to (jnodine@uscupstate.edu).

West Main Artist’s Co-op in Spartanburg, SC, Features Works by Debbie Harris and Rosemary McLeod

April 5, 2016

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Editor’s Note: We missed having this article in our Apr. 2016 issue of Carolina Arts because of an e-mail problem with out server. We’re sorry for this omission.

The West Main Artist’s Co-op announces a collaborative show by members and local artists Debbie Harris and Rosemary McLeod entitled “Pigments of Our Imagination”. The show opens during the Spartanburg Art Walk, April 21, 2016, from 5 – 9pm, and is a celebration of color, texture and form represented in jewelry, paintings and mixed media creations. The exhibit continues through May 14, 2016.

This spring exhibition will showcase their latest work in vibrant colors, geometric forms, and inspired design. Many of the Co-op’s followers are already familiar with both artists because of their active participation in wholesale and retail trade markets and festivals.

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Debbie Harris describes herself as a “late bloomer” and as a self-taught mixed media artist. Her technique relies on the inclusion of vintage textiles and found objects, incorporating inspirational poetry and song lyrics into her whimsical designs. She also combines a variety of substrates and mediums built into various layers as she works to create assemblages and colorful canvases.

Many of Harris’ creations begin with a base of organic design and abstract representation in vibrant color. She teaches her technique at Greenville Health Centers Cancer Center and at the Cyrill-Westside Library in Spartanburg. She is an active member of the West Main Artists Co-op and hosts her signature “Crazy Fun Art pARTies”.

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Rosemary McLeod is a jewelry artist and painter inspired by the colors, shapes and textures found in nature and in the elegant lines of geometry. She studied art while attending Winthrop University and attended various adult classes in metalsmithing, silversmithing and enameling.

The brilliant palette of Monet and the larger than life flowers of Georgia O’Keefe serve as inspiration for much of McLeod’s work. She is self-taught in the use of alcohol inks as a medium for her vibrant paintings and has extended this technique to copper metals for her jewelry creations. Her palette is bright, happy and playful as she manipulates organic shapes into unique works of art.

McLeod is an active member of The West Main Artists Co-op and serves on the board as Retail Committee Chair.

West Main Artists Cooperative is located at 578 West Main Street, in Spartanburg. WMAC is open from 10am until 6pm. Tuesday through Friday, and from 10am until 4pm on Saturdays.

For more information visit (www.westmainartists.org) or (https://www.facebook.com/westmaincoop/).

Spartanburg Art Museum in Spartanburg, SC, to Participate in Accreditation Academy

February 28, 2016

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Spartanburg Art Museum (SAM), in Spartanburg, SC, has been selected as one of 10 museums from across the country to participate in the Small Museum Accreditation Academy. This is a new initiative funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and assisted by an advisory panel of leaders in the museum field. It is a year-long readiness program to make the Alliance’s accreditation process more accessible to smaller institutions. At the end of the program, the participating museums will emerge with a stronger culture of excellence and be poised to apply for accreditation. Joseph Klem from the American Alliance of Museums writes: “The Academy is designed for high-performing organizations with five or fewer staff members who are striving to meet best practices and achieve accreditation.”

Spartanburg Art Museum has been working hard to re-position itself as a vital component within the cultural landscape of Spartanburg and beyond. Two years ago, Elizabeth Goddard was hired as the Executive Director, and since that time the museum has undergone significant transformation. “When I began there was a palpable risk of failure from a financial, governance, and programmatic perspective. The first year was spent finding the ground and rebuilding an organization that had minimal members, lackluster exhibitions, and weak programs for an increasingly diverse community,” Goddard said. “It is inspiring to see how far we have come.  Knowing that the Board of Directors is as committed as I am to become the destination for contemporary visual art in the Southeast keeps the wind in our sail as we continue to improve, strengthens and build our capacity to serve the community in relevant and meaningful ways.”

Last spring, SAM completed the American Alliance of Museums Assessment Program, which involved months of reflection about everything from finances, collections, governance, and programming. Todd Smith, the professional peer reviewer who spent a few days with the museum staff and Board of Directors last March, commented in his final report: “There is a renewed energy that surrounds the organization, an energy if well harnessed can be transformative for the museum.” SAM also graduated from the Healthy Organization Institute in 2015. A local education program developed by Spartanburg County Foundation, Spartanburg Regional Foundation, and Mary Black Foundation was designed for Executive Directors and Board Presidents to attend together and put a microscope over all aspects of daily and long-term operations.  “These experiences of rebuilding our infrastructure and truly understanding every aspect of the museum’s operations were invaluable for us to move forward,” SAM’s Board President George Nixon said. “SAM completed a strategic plan last spring, and we are energized to become a contemporary cultural leader in the region, serving our community in new and dynamic ways. We are also proud that our Executive Director was named Museum Educator of the Year recently by the South Carolina Arts Educator Association, which demonstrates her professional and personal commitment to education, which is a vital component of our mission.”

The Academy will involve the staff and members of the board as they move through a year-long process of preparation that includes, strengthening core documents, designing an emergency preparedness plan, finalizing a code of ethics, and collections management policies. All of these components are necessary for the accreditation process and signal SAM’s commitment to standards of excellence on a national scale. “Our size does not minimize our dedication to adhering to best practices put forth by the American Alliance of Museums,” Goddard said. “We are thrilled to be accepted into this vital program and look forward to getting started.”

For further information contact Elizabeth Goddard, Executive Director, Spartanburg Art Museum, 220 E. Saint John Street, Spartanburg, South Carolina 29306, call 864/582-7616 x 236 or e-mail to (egoddard@spartanarts.org).

Spartanburg Art Museum in Spartanburg, SC, Offers Classic Contemporaries Program

February 10, 2016

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The Spartanburg Art Museum in Spartanburg, SC, launches a new program, Classic Contemporaries, this February. Designed to provide senior citizens, ages 55 and older, a creative, educational, and social outlet, Classic Contemporaries encourages art enthusiasts to explore contemporary visual art through interactive presentations, exhibition tours, and art-making activities in a studio environment.

“This new initiative offers an in-depth look into our current exhibition, ‘Cognitive Dissonance’,” Executive Director Elizabeth Goddard said. “Classic Contemporaries encourages discussion about concepts and specific works of art within the exhibition. We will provide some historical connections that directly relate to the materials and creative practices within ‘Cognitive Dissonance’, which is a group show featuring contemporary ceramics by nine artists.”

The goal of this program is to provide an informal education and social outlet for those interested in the visual arts. There are four main components within the Classic Contemporaries program that bring education, socializing, and creative exploration together. Upon arrival participants will take part in a presentation that gives some historical background to the medium of ceramics, followed by a tour of the current exhibition, “Cognitive Dissonance”. Lunch is served, and for those feeling encouraged to stretch their creative muscles, there is time to learn about working with ceramics in an informal studio setting.

Spartanburg Art Museum and Janna Phillips, a graduate student of Savannah College of Art and Design, have been working together to develop this program over the course of many months. “Spartanburg is such a wonderful community. Classic Contemporaries is an excellent program for anyone who wishes to engage in the arts, education, meet new people, or become more involved in the SAM community,” Phillips said.

Classic Contemporaries launches on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016, from 10am-2pm, and includes the presentation, exhibition tour, and lunch. Space is limited, and registration is required. Tickets are $25 for SAM members ages 55 and older and $30 for non-members. The two-hour studio portion of the program is an additional $7 for members and $10 for non-members.

For more information please contact Goddard by calling 864/582-7616, ext. 236 or visit (www.SpartanburgArtMuseum.org).