Archive for the ‘Triangle NC Visual Arts’ Category

North Carolina Museum of Art Director Lawrence J. Wheeler Announces Retirement

November 27, 2017

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s director, Lawrence J. Wheeler, has announced his plans to retire in November 2018. In his 23 years at the helm of the NCMA thus far, Wheeler has led the Museum, in Raleigh, NC, to new heights, shaping it into a top-tier art destination and, above all, a welcoming community space for a growing city and state. Wheeler will continue as director until a new director is appointed.

Wheeler was named director of the Museum in October 1994, having served as assistant director at the Cleveland Museum of Art and, before that, as deputy secretary at the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources in Raleigh. During his tenure the NCMA has become one of the leading art museums in America, attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors each year to the Museum galleries, special exhibitions, and Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park.

“North Carolinians of all walks of life have access to one of the most renowned art museums in the country thanks to Larry Wheeler’s visionary leadership,” Governor Roy Cooper said. “From overseeing construction of the original Museum building, to its ambitious expansion in 2010, to the creation of the new Museum Park, Larry has been the North Carolina Museum of Art’s guiding light. North Carolina is better for his service, and Kristin and I wish him all the best in his well-earned retirement.”

In 2006, under Wheeler’s leadership, the Museum unveiled its design for an ambitious expansion. His vision for a spacious, light-filled structure to house the Museum’s permanent collection became a reality in April 2010 with the opening of West Building. Today the American Institute of Architects award–winning space, surrounded by sculpture gardens and reflecting pools, presents works drawn from the NCMA’s outstanding permanent collection, spanning 5,000 years from ancient Egypt to the present day.

Wheeler also oversaw the innovative redesign and transformation of the Museum Park, which is among the largest museum parks in the world. The Park redefines the traditional museum experience as the site of outdoor art installations, community gathering spaces for social interactions, contemplative gardens, and the Joseph M. Bryan, Jr., Theater in the Museum Park, home to a celebrated outdoor performing arts series. “Ultimately, his complete trust in the vision and creative journey shaped the NCMA campus into the community gathering space it is today,” said Dan Gottlieb, director of planning, design, and the Museum Park, who worked closely with Wheeler throughout his entire tenure, and on the West Building and Park projects.

Wheeler worked passionately to develop the Museum’s collection, including securing a gift of 29 Auguste Rodin sculptures from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation in 2009, making the NCMA the largest repository of Rodin’s work in the American South. The large gift followed the tremendous success of the NCMA’s 1999 Rodin exhibition, which drew over 300,000 in attendance. “All Larry asked was to make the Rodin exhibition, which included 60-plus works from the Cantor Foundation, the best Rodin exhibition ever,” said David Steel, curator of European art. “Larry is never satisfied with ‘adequate’ or ‘good.’ What he demands is ‘superlative,’ ‘the best,’ and ‘more.’”

Wheeler strengthened the NCMA’s modern and contemporary collections, including overseeing a gift of works by masters of mid- to late-20th-century American art—Milton Avery, Richard Diebenkorn, Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Hans Hofmann, Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Motherwell, David Park, Sean Scully, Frank Stella, and many others—from the private collection of Jim and Mary Patton.

Wheeler’s awards include his 2017 induction into the Raleigh Hall of Fame, the Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters from the Republic of France, the Medal of Arts from the city of Raleigh, the Leadership Award from the Triangle Business Journal, the Design Guild Award from the North Carolina State University College of Design, and the Thad Eure Memorial Award from the Greater Raleigh Convention and Visitors Bureau. In 2000 he was named Tar Heel of the Year by the Raleigh News & Observer, which called him “the godfather of the Triangle’s cultural boom” and cited his skill at melding “arts, politics, and commerce into a powerful new cultural force.” In November 2010 Wheeler received the inaugural Mary D. B. T. Semans Award for Distinguished Service to the Arts from Duke University’s Nasher Museum of Art.

Wheeler grew up in Lakeland, Florida. He holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in history and French from Pfeiffer College and a Master of Arts and Ph.D. in European history from the University of Georgia. He has received honorary degrees from North Carolina State University and Pfeiffer University.

Details about events surrounding his retirement, including celebrations of Wheeler’s legacy and an installation on the Museum’s history during his directorship, are forthcoming.

For further information call the Museum at 919/839-6262 or visit (www.ncartmuseum.org).

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FRANK Gallery in Chapel Hill, NC, to Relocate to University Place in 2018, Will Conduct Preview Show There in November and December 2017

November 13, 2017

FRANK Gallery, a nonprofit artists’ collective showcasing the work of local and regional fine artists, announces that it will relocate to University Place in Chapel Hill, NC, in early 2018. The organization will celebrate the relocation with a grand re-opening at the new FRANK Gallery location on Friday, Feb. 9th, 2018. FRANK will conduct a preview pop-up show in the new University Place location during the upcoming holiday season, running from Nov. 24, to Dec. 24, 2017.

“We are excited about the broader accessibility and the larger space for outreach exhibits and programs that the move will provide” said Gordon Jameson, FRANK founding member and acting Gallery Manager. “We see the potential for great synergies with the other businesses and organizations located at University Place. We have been a long-time outreach program collaborator with Kidzu Children’s Museum, which is located there,” said Jameson.

FRANK will continue to operate its gallery at the current location in downtown Chapel Hill through Dec. 22, 2017.

FRANK gallery is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit operated by member artists of the Franklin Street Arts Collective, with support from community leaders and art lovers. The mission of the Franklin Street Arts Collective is to support the arts community of Chapel Hill and the region, strengthen community appreciation of the arts through educational outreach, and promote Chapel Hill and North Carolina as a major arts destination. FRANK offers workshops, salons, and innovative programs that reach out to diverse groups within the community.

For more information about FRANK Gallery call 919/636-4135 or visit (www.frankisart.com).

Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC, to Open Store within its Building – Oct. 6, 2017

August 30, 2017

The Ackland Art Museum announced today that its Museum Store, currently located on East Franklin Street in downtown Chapel Hill, NC, will relocate to inside the Museum building, opening for business on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. The Store will be open at its current location on Franklin Street through Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017.

“It feels like a homecoming,” said Katie Ziglar, Director of the Ackland Art Museum. “We are very pleased that we can bring the Museum Store to the Museum. It is an amenity people wish for while visiting the Ackland.”

“We have valued being a part of the fabric of Franklin Street since May of 2011, and have felt very supported by the town of Chapel Hill, the Downtown Partnership, and our customers,” said Alice Southwick, store manager. “As we have always been part of the Ackland Art Museum, it does feel right to be setting up shop inside the Museum’s building. We think our customers will be very pleased.”

The new Ackland Museum Store will include more products that tie to art and exhibitions on view in the Ackland’s galleries, a move that reflects popular demand. The Store will continue to sell works of art by local, regional, and international artists.

“We look forward to being able to offer shopping at the Museum Store—which, in turn, financially supports the Ackland’s exhibitions and programs—as an experience that immediately follows visiting our galleries,” said Ziglar.

Once inside the Museum building, the Store’s hours will follow the Museum’s: Wednesday through Saturday 10am to 5pm and Sunday 1 to 5pm. Like the Museum, the Store will be open until 9pm during the Chapel Hill-Carrboro 2nd Friday ArtWalk evenings.

Featuring a year-round calendar of special exhibitions and dynamic public programs, the Ackland Art Museum—located on the historic campus of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill—encourages visitors to engage with the artistic past as well as with living artists from around the world. The Ackland’s holdings consist of more than 18,000 works of art, featuring significant collections of European masterworks, twentieth-century and contemporary art, African art, and North Carolina pottery. In addition, the Ackland has North Carolina’s premier collections of Asian art and works on paper (drawings, prints, and photographs). Its global collection of artworks from antiquity to the present makes the Ackland uniquely able to advance the teaching and research missions of the University.

The Ackland Art Museum is located at 101 South Columbia Street, just south of Franklin Street, on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.

Admission to the Ackland Art Museum is free.

More information is available at (ackland.org).

Monster Drawing Rally Returns to the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, NC, Aug. 25, 2017

July 30, 2017

The second annual Monster Drawing Rally, featuring more than 70 artists at all stages of their careers taking shifts to draw for an hour in front of a live audience. As spectators spy on the creative process, sketches morph into full-fledged works of art. Finished drawings are immediately available for $50 each. DJ Forge will be spinning beats, and a variety of food trucks will be on hand. The evening also includes a collaborative art project sponsored by Flight Fund.


View from past event

Monster Drawing Rally makes art more accessible as a way to view new talent, interact with North Carolina’s artistic community, and support NCMA programming. Inspired by the San Francisco artist-centered nonprofit Southern Exposure, whose mission is to show support to local artists, we’ve adopted this fund-raising idea to bring North Carolina artists to the Museum for a night of creating, mingling, drinking, and fun.

Artists include Ben Shafer, Miriam Zimil, Drew Hill, Greg Baldwin, Kiki Farish, Maya Freelon Asante, Rio Aubry Taylor, Sean Kernick, Marx Myth, Bart Cusick, and more.

Food trucks include The Parlour, Stuft, Flirting with Fire, Bulkogi, and Soomsoom Pita Pockets.

The event takes place in the East Building at the North Carolina Museum of Art, 2110 Blue Ridge Road in Raleigh, NC, Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, from 5:30 to 9pm.

Tickets: $5 for members, $10 for nonmembers, free for children under 6 with ticket. Purchase online or through the Box Office at 919/715-5923

The NCMA hosts a special related event, ArtCast Live Podcast, on Thursday, August 3, featuring artists from the Monster Drawing Rally and local podcasters Jen Dasal, NCMA associate curator of contemporary art (ArtCurious) and Jeff Bell, host (Don’t You Lie to Me). The event is free with ticket. The ArtCast Live event is also the debut of the Art-o-Mat art vending machine. For $5, attendees can get a unique piece of art, dispensed through a one-of-a-kind vintage vending machine. Learn about the podcast hosts and artists on the Museum site.

For further info visit (http://ncartmuseum.org).

FRANK Gallery in Chapel Hill, NC, Launches Apprentice Program for Emerging Artists

March 30, 2017

The Franklin Street Arts Collective (FRANK Gallery) in Chapel Hill, NC, will begin accepting applications for a one-year emerging artist apprentice program on April 1, 2017. The program will provide the selected artist(s) with opportunities for professional development, exposure, sale of artwork, and collaboration with the gallery, its members and local arts organizations.

“The apprentice program allows FRANK to give promising young artists an opportunity to learn the business of art through a truly hands-on experience, and from within a creative and supportive community,” said Torey Mishoe, Gallery Manager.

The program seeks to foster mutual growth between the apprentice, and the gallery artists. The apprentice’s participation in the collective offers the benefits of a FRANK membership, including exhibition opportunities in the gallery, mentorship from professional artists, and unrivaled access to the professional arts community in Chapel Hill and the Triangle. As an apprentice artist, the selected artist(s) will be expected to fulfill the duties of a member artist which include working in the gallery and serving on gallery committees, hosting artist talks, demonstrations, and/or workshops, and assisting in developing a community outreach exhibit.

Artists will be selected primarily on the strength of their artwork; apprenticeship will last for one year. Applicants must be 35 years of age or younger. Individuals from groups underrepresented in visual arts organizations are encouraged to apply. All qualified applicants will receive consideration without regard to race, color, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, or national origin.

Applications will be accepted from April 1 – 30, 2017 online at (www.frankisart.com/emerging). We will not accept mailed or e-mailed applications. Questions can be directed to (info@frankisart.com). Candidates will be notified by May 15, 2017. The residency will run from Aug. 2017 to July 2018.

FRANK Gallery is the art heartbeat of Downtown Chapel Hill – offering access to contemporary art by established local artists and a welcoming place for art lovers to gather on historic Franklin Street. Featuring work from more than 70 artists, FRANK is a 501(c)(3) non-profit collective, founded by the area’s finest artists working together to open the door for creative innovation in the arts.

The Mission of the Franklin Street Arts Collective is to support the local arts community and promote a vibrant downtown Chapel Hill through exhibits, events, programs, and educational outreach through FRANK Gallery.

Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC, Receives Largest Gift Ever, Valued at $25 Million, including 7 Rembrandt Drawings

January 27, 2017

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The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC’s Ackland Art Museum has received its largest gift ever, donated from alumnus Sheldon Peck and his wife Leena – valued at $25 million.

The unprecedented commitment includes an $8 million endowment to support a new curator and future acquisitions and an art gift of 134 primarily 17th-century European masterworks, valued at $17 million, including seven works by Rembrandt van Rijn.

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Rembrandt van Rijn, Dutch, 1606 – 1669: Canal and Boats with a Distant View of Amsterdam, c. 1640; reed pen and finger rubbing in dark brown (iron-gall) ink, 4-1/16 x 8 in. Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The Peck Collection.

With the Peck Collection gift, the Ackland becomes the first public university art museum in the United States to own a collection of drawings by Rembrandt and only the second university art museum in the nation to do so.

The masterworks are a major collection of Dutch and Flemish drawings built by the Pecks over the last four decades. Along with the Rembrandts, the collection includes nearly 100 17th-century Dutch landscape, genre and figural compositions by artists such as Aelbert Cuyp, Jan van Goyen and Jacob van Ruisdael, as well as a dozen 17th-century Flemish drawings by masters like Pieter Paul Rubens, Jacob Jordaens and Paul Bril. A group of 15 18th- and 19th-century Dutch drawings is also part of the collection.

One of the Rembrandt drawings in the collection bears an inscription in the artist’s own handwriting, which until this donation was the last known drawing with such an inscription remaining in private hands.

“This amazing gift of European Golden Age art treasures – preserved for nearly 400 years and lovingly collected by the Pecks over the past 40 years – delights us today with its timeless beauty and will forever inspire future generations of students, scholars and visitors that come to our historic campus,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “These drawings are a remarkable window through which we glimpse past cultures and times through the eyes of masters. We are honored by the inestimable value of the Pecks’ gift because it advances Carolina’s public mission to serve the people of North Carolina and makes the university a destination for people of all ages from around the world for all time.”

The Pecks’ gift includes the Peck Collection Endowment Fund and the Sheldon Peck Curatorship Fund, dedicated to the care and enhancement of the Peck Collection, including conservation, digitization and cataloging, as well as funds for the acquisition of other European and American masterworks created before 1950.

The endowment will also enable the Ackland to create and support a new position at the museum: the Sheldon Peck curator of European and American art and curator of the Peck Collection. This is the Ackland’s first full-time endowed position.

“We are overjoyed with the Pecks’ exceptionally generous gift of art, funds for its stewardship and support for future acquisitions,” said Ackland Art Museum Director Katie Ziglar. “Thanks to the new curatorial position their endowment also provides, we look forward to organizing a series of special exhibitions focusing on masterworks from the Peck Collection. Works of such high achievement and quality will fascinate and delight Ackland visitors for decades to come.”

With their gift, the Pecks aspire to offer the public a deeper appreciation for the Dutch masters’ celebration of beauty in the everyday.

“The exceptional vision and profound humanity of the Dutch masters’ drawings still have the power to surprise and delight 400 years after their creation. I hope many will experience the pleasure and awe these works still elicit in me every time I study one,” said Sheldon Peck. “I am thrilled the Ackland, with its distinguished tradition of commitment to the research and exhibition of drawings, will now be the steward of what Leena and I have brought together.”

Peck, a native of Durham, is a prominent orthodontic specialist, educator and art collector. After receiving his undergraduate degree from Carolina in 1963 and his doctorate from the UNC School of Dentistry in 1966, he moved to Boston for a residency in orthodontics and then entered private practice and academics. Peck was a clinical professor of developmental biology at the Harvard University School of Dental Medicine for 20 years, and served as an adjunct professor of orthodontics at Carolina’s School of Dentistry.

He has generously donated art to the Ackland since 1988, when he gave a drawing by Allart van Everdingen to the museum in honor of his much-admired older brother and Carolina alumnus, Harvey Peck. Works of art from the Pecks’ collection, many of them exhibited for the first time, were on view in the 1999 Ackland travelling exhibition “Fresh Woods and Pastures New.”

Peck has been a member of the Ackland’s national advisory board since 1987, and he and his wife are longtime supporters of the museum’s “Art For Lunch” lecture series.

“We are thrilled that a longtime board member has made such an unparalleled gift to the Ackland, which brings the museum to a new level of importance in the region and in our country,” said Kate Nevin, Ackland advisory board chair.

About the Ackland Art Museum

Featuring a year-round calendar of special exhibitions and dynamic public programs, the Ackland Art Museum – located on the historic campus of UNC-Chapel Hill – encourages visitors to engage with the rich legacy of the artistic past as well as with living artists from around the world. The Ackland’s holdings consist of more than 18,000 works of art, featuring significant collections of European masterworks, 20th-century and contemporary art, African art, North Carolina pottery and folk art. Additionally, the Ackland holds North Carolina’s premiere collections of Asian art and works on paper (drawings, prints and photographs). This universal collection of artworks from antiquity to the present makes the Ackland uniquely able to advance the teaching and research missions of the University.

About the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 110 master’s, 64 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s 317,000-plus alumni live in all 50 states and 156 other countries. More than 167,000 live in North Carolina.

For further information contact Emily Bowles by calling 919/843-3675 or by e-mail to (emily.bowles@unc.edu).

North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, NC, Installs Two Sculptures by Mark di Suvero in Museum Park

December 23, 2016

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The North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA), in Raleigh, NC, has installed two large-scale steel sculptures by New York–based artist Mark di Suvero in its Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park. The sculptures, 26-foot-tall Ulalu and 32-foot-tall No Fuss, are on long-term loan to the Museum.

“We’re thrilled to install not one but two of Mark di Suvero’s striking, vibrant, and imaginative sculptures at the NCMA,” says Linda Dougherty, the Museum’s chief curator and curator of contemporary art. “These sculptures—appearing to defy gravity with a tremendous sense of dynamism, energy, and movement—will be a perfect addition to the Park, engaging with both the landscape and our visitors.”

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Mark di Suvero, “Ulalu”, 2001, stainless steel, painted steel, 26′ 7″ h x 30′ w x 15′ d, © 2016 Mark di Suvero. Photo courtesy of the North Carolina Museum of Art

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Mark di Suvero, “No Fuss”, 2003-2008, steel, 32 x 50 x 30 ft, © 2016 Mark di Suvero. Photo courtesy of the North Carolina Museum of Art

Internationally renowned for the monumental steel sculptures he has created for over five decades, Di Suvero employs the industrial tools of cutting and welding torches and cranes to create massive, architectural works out of steel I-beams. The improbable angles and sharp lines of his constructions, like giant 3-D drawings, activate the landscapes they are placed in with enormous, forceful, sweeping gestures.  Playing with balance and suspension, some works, like No Fuss, have movable parts that swing and rotate.

“The enormous, bold sculptures will energize the Museum Park in a whole new way—drawing visitors into the new gardens and rolling meadow, welcoming passersby from the street front, and adding a new element of color and geometric line that will contrast beautifully with the natural landscape,” says Dan Gottlieb, the NCMA’s director of planning, design, and the Museum Park. “Placing Ulala at Blue Ridge Road and No Fuss in the meadow will help unify the campus and visually signify to visitors that they are at the NCMA.”

The dynamic geometry, powerful size, and expansive scale of his work are the result of his creative process. “I don’t build small models or draw detailed plans first,” says Mark di Suvero. “I start with a vision, a dream of what I want to do, and see where it goes.”

Di Suvero lives and works in New York, NY.

The two installations are made possible by the NCMA’s Art in the Environment Fund, which was established to support temporary, permanent, and loaned installations of public art in the NCMA Park and community. It is dedicated to the investment in significant and engaging public art and to providing accessible and meaningful experiences with art and nature for the people of North Carolina.

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years, from ancient Egypt to the present, making the institution one of the premier art museums in the South. The Museum’s collection provides educational, aesthetic, intellectual, and cultural experiences for the citizens of North Carolina and beyond. The 164-acre Museum Park showcases the connection between art and nature through site-specific works of environmental art. The Museum offers changing national touring exhibitions, classes, lectures, family activities, films, and concerts.

The Museum opened West Building, home to the permanent collection, in 2010. The North Carolina Museum of Art, Lawrence J. Wheeler, director, is located at 2110 Blue Ridge Road in Raleigh. It is the art museum of the State of North Carolina, Pat McCrory, governor, and an agency of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, Susan Kluttz, secretary.

Professional Art Quilters Alliance – South Calls for Entries for Annual Exhibit in Cary, NC – Deadline Feb. 10, 2017

December 23, 2016

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PAQA-South (Professional Art Quilters Alliance – South) announces a call for entry for its “13th International juried exhibit ARTQUILTSrespite” at Page-Walker Arts & History Center, Cary in Cary, NC, April 20 – June 24, 2017.

Registration is open Jan. 1 – Feb. 10, 2017.

Prospectus available online at (http://paqa-south-juried.org/).

Raleigh Fine Arts Society in Raleigh, NC, Calls for Entries of Its “39th Annual NC Artists Exhibition” – Deadline Jan. 9, 2017

November 11, 2016

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The “39th Annual North Carolina Artists Exhibition” is an annual juried exhibit for two-dimensional and three-dimensional visual art featuring established and emerging artists from across North Carolina. It  is the largest all media, juried artists exhibition in the state. Prizes totaling $6,000 are awarded. All North Carolina residents ages 18 and over are eligible.

Deadline for entry is Jan. 9, 2017.

The Juror for this year’s exhibition is Michael Rooks the Wieland Family Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the High Museum in Atlanta, GA. He has served as juror for numerous exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad. The High Museum is one of the leading art museums in the Southeastern United States, with more than 15,000 works of art in its permanent collection and dedicated to supporting and collecting works by Southern artists.

The Raleigh Fine Arts Society mission is to encourage the pursuit of art, music and the written word. Since the 1970s The Raleigh Fine Arts Society (RFAS)  has been involved in a variety of projects in support of arts in the community. The “North Carolina Artists Exhibition” is one of three signature arts projects executed by RFAS annually. The Literary Contest is a short story writing contest for Wake County high school students in grades 10, 11 and 12. The Choral Celebration offers choral groups in grades 4 and 5 in Wake County Schools a chance to share their music as well as enjoy the successes of other elementary school choruses performing in Meymandi Concert Hall at the Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts.

Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts: Exhibition Opening Reception and Juror’s Lecture Mar. 12, 2017  4pm Meymandi Hall. Exhibition Dates: Mar. 12 – Apr. 27, 2017 at Betty Ray McCain Gallery

For further information e-mail Susan Garrity at (artistsexhibition@gmail.com).

North Carolina Museum of Art’s Stacey Kirby in Raleigh, NC, Awarded 2016 ArtPrize Juried Grand Prize

October 17, 2016

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The North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA), in Raleigh, NC, announces that NCMA conservation assistant Stacey Kirby has been awarded the Juried Grand Prize at the eighth annual international art competition ArtPrize. A jury of art experts selected Kirby’s work, “The Bureau of Personal Belonging,” as the winner out of 1,453 submissions. As one of two Grand Prize winners—one juried and one selected by popular vote—Kirby was awarded $200,000.

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Pictured left to right: Heather Gordon, Warren Hicks, Stacey Kirby, Harriet Hoover. Photo by Alex Maness.

“ArtPrize was an expansive journey for me as an artist,” says Stacey Kirby. “The vision that I had for the work came to fruition as a result of the hard work of fellow North Carolina artists, the Grand Rapids, MI, community members, and ArtPrize’s incredible staff. I am honored and delighted to represent North Carolina’s thriving arts community through this award.”

ArtPrize, an international art competition decided equally by public vote and expert jury, is held annually in Grand Rapids, MI. It has been named the most attended public art event in the world for two consecutive years by “The Art Newspaper”—average daily attendance at the 19-day event is on par with that of the Louvre in Paris and surpasses that of the British Museum in London and the Met in New York. This year’s ArtPrize began Sept. 21, and the award ceremony was held Oct. 7, 2016.

Kirby’s interactive, performative installation, “The Bureau of Personal Belonging,” was selected as the Grand Prize winner by jurors Michelle Grabner, artist and professor at School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Paul Ha, director at the MIT List Visual Arts Center; and Eric Shiner, senior vice president at Sotheby’s. The second Grand Prize, based on smartphone-enabled popular vote, was awarded to James Mellick for his work “Wounded Warrior Dogs”.

“The Bureau of Personal Belonging” is a site-specific installation comprising three ongoing works where visitors interact with the artist and other performers within a re-created bureaucratic office setting. With this interactive work, Kirby critically examines governmental process and policy while encouraging visitors and the public to trust in the validity of their own voices.

“Stacey has been a creative force on the NCMA team for several years,” says Lawrence J. Wheeler, director of the NCMA. “It is most gratifying—and exciting—to watch her emerge as an artist of international importance. She has a lot to say. We congratulate her on her ArtPrize honor.”

As conservation assistant at the NCMA, Kirby assists conservators with treatment and maintenance of the Museum’s collection, outdoor sculptures, and special exhibitions.

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years, from ancient Egypt to the present, making the institution one of the premier art museums in the South. The Museum’s collection provides educational, aesthetic, intellectual, and cultural experiences for the citizens of North Carolina and beyond. The 164-acre Museum Park showcases the connection between art and nature through site-specific works of environmental art. The Museum offers changing national touring exhibitions, classes, lectures, family activities, films, and concerts.

The Museum opened West Building, home to the permanent collection, in 2010. The North Carolina Museum of Art, Lawrence J. Wheeler, director, is located at 2110 Blue Ridge Road in Raleigh. It is the art museum of the State of North Carolina, Pat McCrory, governor, and an agency of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, Susan Kluttz, secretary.

For further information contact Emily Kowalski by calling 919/664-6795 or e-mail to (ekowalski@ncartmuseum.org).