Archive for the ‘Upstate SC Visual Arts’ Category

The 7th Annual Clemson Festival of Arts Takes Place in Clemson, SC – May 20, 2017

May 10, 2017

Many of the area’s best artists will present their work – including clay, painting, jewelry, fiber, glass, sculpture and more – at the 7th Annual Clemson Festival of Arts on Saturday, May 20, 2017, from 10am to 5pm.  A ‘Parade of Characters’ for all ages featuring princesses, superheroes and other popular costumes kicks off the event at 9:30am and is followed by art demonstrations, hands-on art projects, music and food throughout the day.

The Clemson Festival of Arts is unique in our area. Children, family and friends will enjoy an ‘art full’ Saturday that offers something for everyone.

In addition to the fine, handcrafted art for sale, everyone will enjoy the artist demonstrations and a visit to the outdoor ‘pop up’ gallery. This year’s Festival features the largest community artwork piece yet and everyone is invited to help create it – it’s an amazing, one-of-a kind work!

No child will be bored at the Kids Art Park! Creative, fun, hands-on projects available throughout the day include:
-a cardboard box maze to explore and decorate with graffiti
-teepees to decorate and enclose by yarnbombing
-a variety of devices to make and decorate bubbles
-a dress up stage and mini plays
-a woodworking area to hammer together individual creations
-hat making by transforming brown bags and scrap paper into crazy head gear
-a paint station offering three different painting techniques including pendulums, foam stamping and squirt bottles
-and, of course, the ever popular face painting

For adults who want to experience art in a ‘close up and personal’ way, the Art in Action tents offer projects throughout the day that are the perfect way to give it a try! Create a ‘make & take’ clay Angel or Pinwheel Christmas ornament, a mixed media piece under the guidance of Ellen Kochansky, a unique jewelry piece, or any of several painting projects.

Music abounds throughout the Festival with the sounds of Betsy Bish, Sam Winzenread & Accompanist, SEWA Drummers and Rob Seel.

Most everyone will work up an appetite, so the covered Food Court offers food and beverage selections from Friends of the Farm, The Arts Center’s Hot Dog Stand, Super Taco, Little Orbits and King of Pops.

Be sure not to miss this fun-filled Festival, which gets bigger and better with each passing year. The Festival is FREE and takes place in downtown Clemson at Catherine Smith Plaza, Jaycee Park and Edgewood Avenue.

Visit (www.explorearts.org) for Festival activity details and project and demonstration times.

City of Greenville, SC, Expands Arts District

April 27, 2017

The Gallery at West Greenville is an extension of the emerging Village of West Greenville arts district in the City of Greenville, SC.

The Gallery was conceived based on best practices in affordable artist housing as documented by Artspace, a lead developer of over 35 completed projects that provide affordable living and workspace for low income artists throughout the country.

Live in Community with Visual Artists

The Gallery at West Greenville is not just housing made available to artists; it is housing designed to support the distinct needs of visual artists.

The 12 residential units are live/work units that have enough additional space (approximately 150 square feet) to use as a working studio, thereby freeing the resident artists from the burden of renting separate space.

Each unit has one bedroom, a full service kitchen, living and dining area, one full bath and accessible half-bath in the studio space. Each unit offers a flexible open floor plan and modern appliances including an in-unit washer and dryer.

The Gallery will also include a community building that will provide each artist with exhibition space to support 1 month per calendar year for a solo exhibit.

For the 12 live/work studios, eligible artist applicants must demonstrate a commitment to being a visual artist and living in a cooperative and creative environment that exists to engage in the greater Greenville community.

A working artist shall be defined as:

A person who works in, or is skilled in any of the visual arts, including but not limited to: ceramics, drawing, fiber, jewelry, painting, photography, printmaking, mixed media and sculpture. *Please note: Kilns will not be permitted on site for artists working in ceramics.
In all visual art disciplines, a professional dedicated to using their expertise within the community to support, promote, present, and/or teach their art form through events, activities, and classes.
Derives the majority of their income from the production of original art and intends to pursue full-time engagement in the arts.
Intends to engage and integrate with the Village of West Greenville arts community.

Artist applicants will be screened and scored by the Artist Selection Committee to determine applicant’s’ commitment to pursuing a career in visual arts and quality of applicant’s artistic portfolio. The twelve top-scoring artists will be offered living/work space by The Greenville Housing Authority. A waiting list of interested artists will also be determined by the Artist Selection Committee.

To learn more, contact: Liz Rundorff Smith, GCCA Art School Director by e-mail at (liz@artcentergreenville.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Adds Three New Quilt Blocks

April 27, 2017

# 196 “The Together Tree” and #197 “Star of Leadership”

The first two quilts displayed on Pickens County schools can be found at West End Elementary School on Pelzer Highway, just south of Route 123 as you enter Easley, SC, from the west. They are funded by the school and are the brainchildren of the principal, Angie Rodgers. Resident art teacher, Christina Covington’s 4th grade art students participated in the painting of both “Star of Leadership” and “The Together Tree.” The students also submitted names for the two squares, which were then selected by vote. Covington also was involved in painting, taking time off from her Christmas holiday to come to the Walhalla, SC, studio to paint the geometric details of the background in the “Star of Leadership” quilt square.

“The Together Tree” is based originally on an art project designed by a former art teacher, Erin Murphy, at the school. This framed painting hangs in the front entrance of the school and is decorated with the fingerprints of students and teachers at West End. “The fingerprints symbolize that we are all part of something bigger and how we all work together in our own unique and special ways,” states Covington.

The original quilts were also the inspiration of West End’s current principal, Angie Rodgers, who asked a group of quilters, mostly made up of retired West End teachers, to design and sew two hanging quilt squares for the school to display on the walls. Members of this quilting circle meet weekly to sew and also take sewing trips together. The group started approximately eight years ago and includes; Gail King, Janet Hadaway, Kathy Peot, Beth Holcombe and Paula Grant. King and Hadaway were former 4th grade teachers and Holcombe taught 5th grade. Peot is a retired nurse, but is also the mom of former West End students! Grant, a retired 5th grade Science teacher and the youngest of the quilters has recently retired from West End and can now participate fully in the fun.

“The Together Tree”, designed by Janet Hadaway, depicts a tree, surrounded by an appliqued window frame and decorated with actual buttons on a raindrop printed background. This quilt celebrates the diversity of West End as well as the many students who have come and gone through the school.

The “Star of Leadership”, also created as a quilted wall hanging was designed by Beth Holcombe. This block is a variation of the traditional “Star of the Alamo” block pattern. It was inspired by the bright, primary colored blocks in the tiled floors of the hallways of the school, especially where the halls meet at an intersection. This pattern was chosen for its likeness to a compass, directing students to move forward to reach their goals.

The two quilt squares are mounted in front of the school, on a brick marquee, formerly used for school signage and the fabric quilts will be displayed in the school building.

Quilt block #198 has been added to the array of quilts in Anderson, SC

Reagan Smith of 26 Oleander Drive selected a “LeMoyne Star” for placement on her backyard fence. Lystra Seymour from Anderson, SC, made the fabric quilt Smith told us:

“Mrs. Seymour husband is a physician that I call on and he proudly displays his wife’s quilts in his office waiting room as well as his patient rooms….this particular quilt happened to be in his back patient room several years ago when it truly caught my eye… knew that with its simplistic design and bold colors that this was the quilt block design I wanted!”

“This eight point star has many names ‘LeMoyne Star’, ‘Puritan Star’ and ‘Lemon Star’ to name a few. There are several theories on who created this pattern. One theory is that the LeMoyne brothers Pierre and Jean Baptist who founded New Orleans had this particular star pattern prominent in Jean Baptiste’s coat of arms. The earliest published date of the ‘LeMoyne Star’ is in a collection of patterns attributed to Joseph Doyle in 1911, according to Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of ‘Pieced Quilt Patterns’. The configuration falls into the category of ‘Eight-pointed/45 degree Diamond Stars’. Doyle called this pattern ‘Puritan Star’ as the design traveled throughout the country the name became corrupted into ‘Lemon Star’.”

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).

Where the Trail Will Lead: The 200th Quilt Square on the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail

April 3, 2017

by Victoria Hurst

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail, in Upstate, SC, is celebrating its 200th quilt square at the Greater Pickens Chamber of Commerce on April 7, 2017, at 12:30pm. For eight years, the Quilt Trail has grown, block by block, into a meaningful part of Upstate South Carolina’s landscape for locals who want to preserve the history and traditions of the area. While the Quilt Trail is built, perpetuated, and maintained by locals with a passion for their history, it is also a unique experience for visitors to the area. The Trail appeals to those who enjoy art, nature, history, crafting, story-telling, and even just taking a car ride through the countryside
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As the UHQT has grown over the years, it has forged a path through the lives of so many in its surrounding communities. The members of the Trail are comprised of people who have had the tradition of quilting passed down to them, those whose created the tradition for themselves, and those who are not quilters but still help make the trail possible in various ways. There are now two teams of over 20 volunteers in Anderson and Oconee Counties. This art form has woven its way into the hearts of this community.

Martha File is the one of the founding members of the trail and continues to work with the UHQT from her current home in Athens, OH. Martha was living in Seneca, SC, when she began working with the Quilt Trail and usually comes back to her home in Seneca for a week or two every month. Her favorite square is mounted there, which is based on a quilt made by her aunt. Martha is passionate about organizations that promote community service and fellowship, and “the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail would not be where it is today without all the community support it has received. This is truly a collaborative effort by many organizations, businesses and individuals in Anderson, Oconee and Pickens Counties. Some of our quilts have been painted by students in the schools, community groups, families, as well as by our volunteers.” Martha has been on this journey since 2009 and has watched as quilt squares have been added to homes, historic buildings, destination venues, and businesses in the Upstate.

Nancy Warmath, who lives outside of Seneca, had both a grandmother and mother who quilted, and she has a quilt that her mother made at the age of 12. She also has a quilt square above her mailbox, #139 “Dogwood Quilt,” based on one of her grandmother’s. Nancy is in the process of making a quilt herself for the first time in 30-something years. After getting involved through Gil Huggins on the Walhalla production team, she has worked on painting several of the quilt squares, beginning with #80, “Wedding Ring” in Central. She also did work on the 200th Quilt, which will be unveiled April 7th. She loves the stories behind the quilts and hopes to see wider promotion of the trail, as it brings more visitors to our area and inspires residents to learn more about their heritage.

One resident of Seneca, Lyn Geibens, has a quilt square on her home (quilted by Gil Huggins) and got involved in the quilt trail through her friend, Jane Bolling. Lyn and Jane worked with the students at Keowee Elementary School to paint their quilt square, #10 “Compass Rose”, and recalls how proud the students were to write their names on the back of what they helped create. Lyn also finds it gratifying to work with a group of “strong willed woman…there is very little criticism and loads of encouragement.”

Oconee County Production Team Leader Chris Troy is an artist based in Bountyland, between Seneca and Walhalla. She also has a quilt square on her house, which represents the first and only quilt that she actually created herself. While Chris’s medium of choice is ceramics rather than textiles, she really values being involved in the UHQT and says “the hands on, face to face interaction of people of diverse backgrounds coming together for the purpose of creating public art has always been a positive endeavor.”

Jim and Barbara Schoonover of Wynward Point in Salem are a husband/wife duo that have been involved with the UHQT since 2009. Barbara is a quilter, and she is on the production team for painting the quilt patterns. Jim cuts the board, paints the primer, and draws the patterns. At this time, he holds the title of only man on the team. He and Barbara both enjoy working with an organization that they see as a great asset to the community and a great “way to connect with locals who have grown up here and those who have moved to this area for the beauty of the Upstate.”

Abby Heid is another resident of Seneca, SC, who finds a strong sense of identity and community from being involved in UHQT: “The people who participate in the UHQT have a strong camaraderie…[they] bring together their individual skill sets with each new quilt project. The talents of artists, quilters, crafters, and those who want to learn come together to turn someone’s hand or machine-sewn quilt into a fantastic work of art. The teamwork is amazing. It is the people, who come weekly to the studio and contribute their talents, laughter, and chatter that make you feel welcomed and come back to learn more.”

The members of the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail put in over 7,000 volunteer hours per year, giving presentations, painting quilt squares with members of the community, and finding ways to improve and promote this priceless resource. As these proud members reveal their 200th milestone along a winding, scenic, and sometimes uphill road, they also have announcements about how this project will continue to grow and reach even more people across the region and beyond. Join the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail at the Pickens Chamber of Commerce at 222 W. Main St. in Pickens, SC on April 7th at 12:30pm to see where the trail will lead!

Victoria Hurst is a writer, traveler and Clemson native who is now based in Charleston, SC.

For further information visit (www.uhqt.org).

Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, Celebrates the Opening of Northside Artlets

March 30, 2017

On Apr. 11, 2017 from 5-7pm the Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, along with their partners and the Northside community will celebrate the opening of four Northside Artlets. The celebration will take place on the corner of Brawley and Farley Streets at two of the Artlet locations.

An opening ceremony will begin at 5:15pm with lots of activities and performances to follow. Join us for hands-on arts and crafts like painting, carving, planting and more. Live music and spoken word poetry along with refreshments will be enjoyed by all.

The Northside Artlets are outlets for art, and serve as public spaces for the creation of art. Designed and built to nurture social, cultural, and physical connections to place, embedding art in daily ritual to evoke community memory, tradition, and meaning. Conceived by the Northside Voyagers during the 2014 master planning process led by Art-Force, the Artlets were designed by Spartanburg Artist, Eli Blasko. The Northside Artlets were built by Blasko, four Apprentices receiving NCCER Certification through Spartanburg Community College, and Northside residents. The Northside Artlets provided workforce training, skills, and jobs for apprentices, renewed focus and access for cultural exchange in the Northside neighborhood, and provided direct collaboration with a professional artist.

Jennifer Evins, President and CEO hopes that “by providing a unique place with free daily access to the residents and visitors of the Northside, these Artlets will help to increase the vibrancy of the neighborhood and attract new residents and businesses to this developing community. The arts are known to make neighborhoods livable and express the unique culture of residents.” Northside has a long history of excellence in the visual and performing arts and is home to Spartanburg’s music legend Pink Anderson, Visual Artist and Educator Winston Wingo and many others.

The Artlets were made possible by a design grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support the design, fabrication, and installation. The result is a resident-inspired cultural destination capturing and extending the history and unique identity of the Northside.

While the project is being led by Chapman Cultural Center, critical partners include Artlet Artist Eli Blasko, Project Director Janet Kagan with Art-Force, the Northside Neighborhood Association as well as contributions from:

Northside Development Group
The Northside Voyagers
Spartanburg Community College Corporate + Community Education
Spartanburg Housing Authority Youth Build Program
Leadership Spartanburg Alumni Association Led by Crystal Pace
Stephen M Poole Builders Inc
Northside Neighborhood Association
Eagle Metals Manufacturing
Duke Energy
Milliken
Creative Development LLC
Anonymous Donor
Dellfrio
Inman Mills
Bob Burnett’s Inc
Jethro Waters
Constance Jones
Contributions of time generously donated by residents

Chapman Cultural Center provides cultural leadership for Greater Spartanburg by developing, strengthening, and promoting the scope, excellence and educational role of the arts, humanities and sciences, and to further their significance in the life of our community and all of its citizens.

The Chapman Cultural Center is located in on East Saint John St in downtown Spartanburg, SC. Please visit (www.ChapmanCulturalCenter.org) for more information.

Upstate (SC) Heritage Quilt Trail Presents 193rd Quilt Block “Ode to Dave”

March 18, 2017

David and Diane Schonauer have added another quilt block to their 1892 Victorian house located at 707 West Market Street in the Westside Historic District in the city of Anderson, SC. The name of this pattern is Railroad Crossing.

Diane took several quilting classes in an adult continuing education program when I lived in Illinois. Each class offered a new pattern, making full size quilt tops. Since she did not have a lot of fabric at the time, nor the need for so many large quilt tops, she miniaturized each pattern the teacher gave them. The quilt is no exception in that the strips only measure ½” by 1 1/2”, and the overall quilt is 17 inches square. It was the first quilt Diane made “on point”. The backing fabric depicts old fashioned locomotives.

She named the quilt “Ode to Dave” in honor of her husband, David Schonauer. “We both worked for Electro-Motive Division of General Motors Corporation, where we helped produce diesel electric locomotives. Dave spent his 31 year working career there, holding a variety of management level positions, including running the Aftermarket Business Unit and overseeing the installation of the SAP computer system.”

For further information visit (www.uhqt.org).

The Johnson Collection in Spartanburg, SC, Offers Lecture by Metropolitan Museum Curator, Sylvia Yount – Mar. 15, 2017

March 7, 2017

Before ascending to one of the most coveted curatorial jobs in New York, Sylvia Yount spent years working in the South, where she developed a deep appreciation for the region’s culture. As the keynote speaker for the fourth annual installment of Voices in American Art, Dr. Yount, who now serves as the first female curator of the Metropolitan Museum’s iconic American Wing, will deliver a lecture that connects her Southern experiences and her achievements as a pioneering female professional with a recurring theme in her scholarship: art created by women.

Her presentation, “A Region of Their Own: Southern Women Artists,” is the centerpiece of the popular yearly symposium sponsored by the Johnson Collection. Open to the public at no charge, the event will take place at Chapman Cultural Center on Mar. 15, 2017, at 7pm. No reservations or tickets are required.

Sylvia Yount became the Lawrence A. Fleischman Curator in Charge of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in September 2014. She is responsible for the administrative oversight of the Wing, with its ten curators and twenty-five other staff and volunteers. She also provides vision and leadership, while defining collecting, interpretation, and audience-engagement goals for the historic department of fine and decorative arts from the colonial period to the early-twentieth century. Before moving to the Met, she spent seven years as Chief Curator and the Louise B. and J. Harwood Cochrane Curator of American Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and six as the Margaret and Terry Stent Curator of American Art and department head at the High Museum of Art. She began her curatorial career at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, America’s oldest art school and museum, in 1993.

In addition to completing pivotal collection reinstallations at her former institutions, Yount has organized major exhibitions (with accompanying catalogues) on Cecilia Beaux, Maxfield Parrish, and American modernism, among other topics. She received a Ph.D. and a M.A. in the History of Art from the University of Pennsylvania, and a B.A. in Italian from New York University. Yount has lectured and published widely on late nineteenth and twentieth century American art and culture as well as on issues of curatorial responsibility and current museum practice.

Created in support of the Johnson Collection’s mission to increase understanding of the dynamic role that art of the South plays in the larger context of our national history, Voices in American Art brings arts professionals from across the country to Spartanburg for annual symposiums that engage the cultural and college communities. Previous VIAA speakers include Jane Panetta, Associate Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art; Jan Postma, Chief Financial Officer of the Museum of Modern Art; Elizabeth Pochoda, former editor of “The Magazine Antiques”; and Sarah Cash, Associate Curator of American and British paintings at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Hailed by “The Magazine Antiques” with staging a “quiet art historical revolution” and expanding “the meaning of regional,” the Johnson Collection offers an extensive survey of artistic activity in the American South from the late eighteenth century to the present day. In May 2016, the Spartanburg-based collection received the Governor’s Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award for the Arts, South Carolina’s highest honor in the field.

For more information, please visit (www.thejohnsoncollection.org).

Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, Announces Date for Spartanburg Soaring! 2017 – Apr. 22, 2017

February 28, 2017

chapmanculturalcenterlogo

The Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, has set the date for its fourth annual Spartanburg Soaring! International Kite Festival for Saturday, April 22, 2017, from 11am-5pm. This free and family-friendly festival has quickly become a much-anticipated event for people of all ages from all over the world. Hundreds of kites fill the sky above Barnet Park in downtown Spartanburg, complemented by live music, food, and children’s activities. During the course of the day, individuals and kite club members float kites of every imaginable shape and size to the sky, from small kites to whale-size kites made from the latest technology and advanced materials. It is a colorful and creative experience.

217spartanburg-kite-festival

The Spartanburg community has embraced the kite as a symbol of its creative, progressive, and playful spirit. Last year, the event attracted more than 3,000 participants from as far away as Europe.

“Every year we grow the Festival in terms of creativity and attendance,” Jennifer Evins, President and CEO of Chapman Cultural Center, said. “It is part of our mission to increase community vibrancy and civic engagement. It is a beautiful showcase of what it means to live in Spartanburg. It is a symbol of our progressive mindset, our creativity, our curiosity, and our playful nature.”

Chapman Cultural Center is now accepting the participation of kite clubs, food vendors, artists, and musicians.

For more information about this event, please call 864/542-ARTS or visit our Facebook Event Page at (https://www.facebook.com/ChapmanCulturalCenter).

Anderson Arts Center in Anderson, SC, Calls for Entries for Its “42nd Annual Juried Show” – Deadline Apr. 1, 2017

February 27, 2017

The Anderson Arts Center’s “42nd Annual Juried Show” and Partnership for Public Arts: SculpTOUR will accept entries on Thursday, Mar. 30, 2017, through Saturday, Apr. 1, 2017, from 10am–4pm in Anderson, SC. Over $18,000 in prizes for Best In Show, Second, Third with specials awards in photography, watercolor, fine craft, and purchase awards are available. Awards for outdoor sculpture total $6,000. The announcement of winners will be held at the Awards Ceremony on Friday, Apr. 28. The show will run until May 26, 2017.

Entries for the annual juried show should be delivered to 110 Federal Street in Anderson, SC. Sculpture entries may be entered as photographs with full description by e-mail at (sydneyb@andersonarts.org). A prospectus may be obtained by calling 864/222-2787 or online at (www.andersonarts.org).

The Arts Center of Greenwood in Greenwood, SC, Offers Fundraiser on Feb. 4, 2017

December 30, 2016

arts-center-of-greenwood-logo

The Arts Center of Greenwood in Greenwood, SC, will be presenting all the glitz and glamour of Las Vegas on Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017 at 7-10pm, with Hearts for the Arts Goes to Vegas!. Guests will enjoy extravagantly decorated tables by local artists, an elegant buffet dinner, and fabulous Vegas entertainment from local “rat-pack” styled performers and ELVIS will be in the building!

Attire: Cocktail Glitz
Admission: Members, $95 couple/$50 single | Non-Members, $110 couple/$60 single advanced ticket sales only, guaranteed seating, cash bar available.

For further info call 864/388-7800 or visit (http://www.emeraldtriangle.us/arts-center).