Archive for the ‘Upstate SC Visual Arts’ Category

Greenville Center for Creative Arts in Greenville, SC, Announces Call for Exhibit Proposals – Deadline Jan. 12, 2018

December 9, 2017

Greenville Center for Creative Arts in Greenville, SC, invites established and emerging artists (ages 18+) to submit proposals for solo or group exhibitions for the 2019/2020 exhibition calendar. The GCCA Main Gallery provides approximately 4,000 square feet of exhibition space and features the work of local, regional, national, and international artists from all disciplines in 6 – 8 shows per year. All mediums will be considered for exhibition.

Deadline for Exhibition Proposals: January 12, 2018.

Exhibition proposals will be reviewed and scored by the GCCA Exhibition Committee using the following criteria:

Work reflects consistency of quality
Work reflects clear objectives and a strong overall concept or theme
Work represents GCCA’s mission to enrich the cultural fabric of the community through visual arts promotion, education, and inspiration
Only original artwork created and executed by the applicant will be considered for exhibition

Submission Requirements:
Artist Statement or Exhibition Description
Artist Bio
CV or Resume
6 – 8 images of work
$30 application fee submitted electronically with application form

CLICK HERE (https://podio.com/webforms/17017714/1144294) to submit a solo or group exhibition proposal to GCCA.

Notification e-mails will be sent mid March. A contract and additional information will be provided if the proposal is accepted. Work will be insured by GCCA while on display. The artist is responsible for delivery of work to and from GCCA. Shipping costs will be the responsibility of the artist.

Contact (exhibitions@artcentergreenville.org) if you have any questions or call 864/735-3948.

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Greenville Technical College in Greenville, SC, Offers Works by Alice Ballard, Katrina Majkut, Lynne Riding, and Katya Cohen

December 3, 2017

Greenville Technical College in Greenville, SC, is presenting an exhibition entitled, f word, featuring works by Alice Ballard, Katrina Majkut, Lynne Riding, and Katya Cohen, on view at RIVERWORKS Gallery, located along the Reedy River in Greenville, through December 16, 2017.

F word is usually a more palatable, polite, hushed version of a caustic, curse. This exhibition, f word, politely whispers an all too often misunderstood term, “feminist”– feminist as the curse of cuckolding, uppity women.

The f word defines feminist as regenerative, life-giving nature as seen in Alice Ballard’s exquisite ceramic wall pods. Ballard defines her process: “I spend countless hours contemplating a particular form in order to feel its energy.  It becomes a Zen-like connection not unlike a meditation.” Ballard, a grandmother, currently teaches at the SC Governor’s School for the Arts (SGCAH) and Humanities and Christ Church Episcopal Middle School and maintains a studio here in Greenville.


Work by Katrina Majkut

The f word is intricate, petite, cross stitched samplers of contraceptive products from Katrina Majkut’s “Control” series. She states, “Such mediums contain their own patriarchal or submissive history, and modernizing them to convey how particular cultural practices are often at odds with women’s parity.” Majkut is a visual artist and writer living and working in Brooklyn, NY. She is dedicated to exploring and understanding feminine narratives and civil rights.

Lynne Riding’s “Concerning Beings” fills the floor of RIVERWORKS with strikingly fragile white paper bowls – vessels, the ancient, mythological female symbol. According to Riding, “It occurred to me that the daily practice required when making these bowls references the daily chores and some of the tedium involved with many daily domestic chores, aligned with attention to detail and the care required.” Riding is a practicing artist in Charleston and on the faculty of the College of Charleston and the Art Institute of Charleston.


Works by Lynne Riding

Katya Cohen states, “Contemporary Art cannot be addressed without tracing its roots to Duchamp’s readymades; his most (in)famous being Fountain done in 1917…” In homage to the 100th Anniversary of Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain, Cohen paints, in the manner of Rubens, details of this classic male fixture as seductive, sensuous, female curves. Cohen lives and maintains a studio practice in Clemson after gracefully retiring from teaching classes, ranging from printmaking to seminars in contemporary art theory, at UGA, Clemson, Anderson, Furman and at the SGCAH.

f word’s subtle images and palette invite contemplation and possibly a rethinking of the cultural myths of feminism. Through its quiet images, forms, and tones it politely asks for consideration of women as equals.

RIVERWORKS Gallery is operated by and for the faculty and students of the Department of Visual and Performing Arts at Greenville Technical College. The gallery is located on River Street, Suite 202, along the scenic Reedy River in downtown Greenville.

For further information call 864/271-0679, e-mail to (elizabeth.markel@gvltec.edu), or visit (www.gvltec.edu/dva) and click on RIVERWORKS.

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Added Number 203 Quilt Block

November 13, 2017

“The name of this quilt pattern is a Star Flower however, we call the quilt Granny Morris’s Dresses since my Maternal Grandmother, Julia Kemp Morris, sewed this quilt back in the early 1940s from fabrics of her old dresses and my grandfather’s shirts,” says Jeanie Morehead Christopher. Julia probably learned the art of quilting from her mother. Most likely, she and her 5 sisters passed the time away while quilting together. “My grandfather, Joseph Walker Morris, bought his first truck when he was 38 years old in 1927. He built a lucrative business known in the Anderson area as J. W. Morris Transfer. Later, the name was changed to Morris Van Lines as that is the name on all the advertising memorabilia (key chains, pencils, pens & business cards) we have in the family. Morris Van Lines moved to Belton Highway in July 1948 where it remained until liquidation by his children in 1993. Both of his children, O. V. Morris and Jeanette Morris Moorhead were involved in this business venture until their retirement. Mr. Morris’ son-in-law James Robert Moorhead was also employed by the company until his retirement in 1982,” adds Christopher.

This quilt is placed on the site of the Morris’ home at 2023 E. River Street (Belton Highway) in Anderson, SC. Hill Electric and Morris Van Lines were business neighbors for many years and Hill Electric bought the property in the 1990’s. They renovated the warehouses and office spaces to suit their electric business. “My grandparents’ home became their temporary offices while they did the remodeling. After a recent tour of the home and the warehouses, I found that much of it remains as it was when I was a child. Roller skating around the transfer trucks and having talent shows in my grandparent’s attic and basement are fond memories at Granny’s house,” say Christopher. “I also recall being able to see the double ferris wheel at the Anderson Fair Grounds from an attic window. We grandchildren would slide down the hill beside the house on broken down packing boxes from the moving business. Granny made fig preserves from her fig tree that is still standing at the bottom of this hill.”

“This quilt has already been a great example of how the Upstate Quilt Trail brings families back together. My first cousin and I have been in contact many times over the last few months while this quilt was being painted. I learned during those conversations that her daughter (the next generation!) has many fond memories of Granny’s house, her meals, her sewing, her garden in the back of the lot and playing as well around the transfer trucks. This would be Granny’s great-grand daughter and she hopes to come up to Anderson and see the quilt installed as well as get a current tour of the house where we all had such a good time!,” adds Christopher.

For further info about the Quilt Trail call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

SE Center for Photography in Greenville, SC, Call for Submissions for “Abstract Image” – Deadline Nov. 5, 2017

October 30, 2017

The SE Center for Photography in Greenville, SC, is looking for non-representational imagery, though it can be from found objects in nature, man made or figurative works. We’re seeking images that do not attempt to represent external reality, but seek to achieve its effect using shapes, forms, colors, and texture.

Our Juror for the Abstract Image is Adam Finkelston, who is the owner, publisher and co-editor of, “The Hand Magazine: A Magazine For Reproduction-based Arts”, an internationally- recognized quarterly art magazine. In addition to curating, Finkelston has also juried exhibitions for LA Photo Curator and Core New Art Space in Denver, CO. Mr. Finkelston holds an MA in Photography from the University of Missouri- Kansas City (UMKC), a BFA in Photography from the Kansas City Art Institute, and a BA in Art Education from UMKC.

Abstract Prospectus (http://www.sec4p.com/abstract-prospectus-1)

Submissions Close 11/5/17

Exhibition Opens 1/5/18

The SE Center for Photography, 1239 Pendleton St, Greenville, SC 29611

For further info call 864/605-7400, e-mail to (info@sec4p.com), or visit (sec4p.com).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Offers Studio Update

October 6, 2017

It’s been a busy summer for the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail (UHQT). We have opened a new studio in Pickens County at the Holly Springs Center and moved the Walhalla studio to the former Oakway Intermediate School in Westminster. The Anderson studio is still located at the Anderson Arts Center. All the studios are integral components of the UHQT and production of quilt panels. All our production teams are hard at work and looking forward to a busy fall and winter. Direct communication links are highlighted.

Anderson County
110 Federal Street, Anderson
Painting studio located in the Old Carnegie Library Basement
Hours: Fridays 9:30 – Noon
Contact: Diane Schonauer by calling 864/231-9317

Oconee County
150 Schoolhouse Road, Westminster, former Oakway Intermediate School
Hours: Tuesday and Thursday, from 9:30 – Noon
Contact: Chris Troy by calling 864/985-1096

Pickens County
Holly Springs Center
120 Holly Springs School Road, Pickens, Room #110
Hours: Thursday and First and Third Saturdays, from 10:00 -2:00. Check Face Book for updates Holly Springs Center Quilt Painting Group
Contact: Cindy Blair by calling 864/973-3921

Visit our Face Book page for production updates and news. Please contact us at 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Hub City Empty Bowls in Spartanburg, SC, Says Soup’s On – Oct. 28, 2017

September 30, 2017

Hub City Empty Bowls will host its annual Soup Day, on Oct. 28, 2017, from 11am-4pm, at the Chapman Cultural Center, to raise money and awareness for hunger in Spartanburg, SC, where about 16 percent of the people are not sure where their next meal is coming from. Spearheaded by Carolina Clay Artists, Soup Day is a community event where citizens can make $15 donations to receive locally handmade pottery bowls and a simple meal of soup, bread, tea, and the fellowship of others who want to make Spartanburg a better place to live.

All money raised will be given to TOTAL Ministries, a local nonprofit charity that helps Spartanburg citizens in dire financial straits. Last year, 2016, Hub City Empty Bowls gave more than $33,000 to TOTAL Ministries. For every bowl taken by a patron, 83 pounds of food can be secured for those in need.

In addition to several hundred pottery bowls to choose from and about two dozen soups donated by local restaurants, patrons will be able to enjoy live music, a silent auction, and a drum circle on an autumn day.

During the summer, Hub City Empty Bowls hosted three public bowl-making events, where the general public was able to make handmade pottery bowls at no cost. All supplies, space, and instruction were donated. These were wholesome, creative, and well attended community events that welcomed everyone, even children who made some of the most endearing bowls. The hand-shaped bowls were left in at the host studios – West Main Artists Co-Op and Spartanburg Art Museum – for touch-ups, painting, and firing. In addition, several experienced and professional potters donated bowls, many of which were wheel thrown and of professional quality. All of those bowls will be available on Soup Day. Many people do their Christmas shopping at Soup Day, securing gifts that have significant social and creative meaning.

Empty Bowls is a worldwide charitable and social phenomenon without any oversight or headquarters. It was started in 1990-91 by a high school art teacher who wanted to involve his students in an art-based community project of making pottery bowls that could be used to raise money to feed the poor. From that humble beginning, the concept spread around the world, taking on many different aspects, but always keeping locally made pottery bowls as the source of the fundraising.

For more information about Hub City Empty Bowls’s 2017 Soup Day, please visit online at (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com).

This program is funded in part by Chapman Cultural Center, its donors, the County and City of Spartanburg, and the South Carolina Arts Commission that receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of SC.

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail of South Carolina to Honor Lucy Harward as the 2017 UHQT Quilter of the Year in Pickens, SC – Oct. 6, 2017

September 29, 2017

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail of South Carolina is pleased to announce a reception to honor Lucy Harward of Pickens, SC, as the 2017 UHQT Quilter of the Year. The Quilter of the Year Program was initiated in 2010 to recognize a quilter who has provided community service and leadership through their quilting. The UHQT receives much support from the quilting community, it is our way to say thank you to artists who provide service to their community.


Lucy Harward and her husband Dale.

The public is cordially invited to the Pickens Community Center in Pickens, SC, at 10am on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017, to celebrate Harward’s many contributions to the community. There will be an exhibition of some of her quilts, in the Granger Fiber Arts Room of the Center. Refreshments will be provided in the Jack Black Room by the UHQT and the Pickens Senior Center. Three of the quilts from the trail that Harward created will be on display in the Jack Black Room. Tours of the facility and its collection of fiber arts and antique sewing items will be available.

Lucy Harward is the driving force of the Granger Fabric Arts room at the Community Center in the City of Pickens. She resides, with her husband Dale, on a beautiful farm, located halfway between Pickens and Pumpkintown. She is a life-long seamstress, completing her first dress at nine years of age, with, as she says, “a zipper down the back.” Harward began quilting approximately 30 years ago when she and Dale lived in Winter Garden, FL. She was taking classes in a shop on tailoring and dressmaking and admired the quilts displayed there. The rest is history, as they say!

Upon retirement 18 years ago, she and Dale moved back to Pickens where Harward grew up and attended her daddy’s church, Grace Methodist, went to school at Pickens Junior & Senior High, and walked down the old Doodle Trail with her friend Jane Eckman so many years ago.
Harward is also a long time member and past president of the UpCountry Quilt Guild. Her many accomplishments include fund raising and grant writing for the Pickens Community Center and the Hagood Auditorium, weekly volunteering and serving on the board of Canon Hospital, volunteer coordinator for Meals on Wheels and developing a variety of ministries and outreach throughout the county. She shares her expertise with any learners who come her way, creating a plethora of classes in the fiber arts.

As Harward states, “I help people achieve things that they would like to achieve!”

For further information call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in SC, Adds New Quilt Block

August 30, 2017

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in SC, continues to grow as a destination for travelers interested in quilts, barns, outdoor art and the history of the Upstate.

Heidi Wolko, a renowned quilter whose creations have been exhibited at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, Kentucky told us that this work was “one of 31 pieces from three different art quilt groups. They were all part of the Everchanging River that Bonnie Ouellette, our “Thread Heads Mother”, had dreamt up. Needless to say, all of us felt extremely honored about the invitation from the museum to exhibit after the “River” had traveled around the U.S. for about three years. Following the exhibit at the museum, the “River” made one more long trip – to Taiwan – until the individual pieces were returned to their creators.”

Her quilt, “Illusion”, is the two hundredth two addition to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail. The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail sponsored this quilt for the Anderson Arts Center and it will join the other painted art quilt already on display at the Art Center Building located at 110 W. Federal Street, Anderson, South Carolina. The inspiration fabric quilt was shown along with another of Ms. Wolko’s quilts at the Double Illusions show sponsored by the Anderson Arts Center in 2015. Attendees at the show cast their votes for the quilt they thought should be added to the Arts Center building. The Illusion quilt had been displayed in Wolko’s Fair Play, SC home but after its selection for the UHQT, Ms. Wolko donated the quilt for an auction to benefit the Arts Center.

Wolko is a self-taught quilter who designed and made this quilt in 2008. The quilt was inspired by the book Blockbender Quilts written by Margaret J. Miller. This book encouraged Wolko to experiment with color. Wolko is a fiber artist whose use of texture, color and design has made a name for herself in the quilting community. She is the recipient of several quilting awards and continues to share her ideas and encouragement with other quilters. “One thing is for sure – I certainly LOVE color.” Images of some of her creations can be found by Googling Heidi Wolko.

For further info call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Valerie Zimany Appointed as Interim Chairperson for the Department of Art at Clemson University in Clemson, SC

June 22, 2017

Valerie Zimany, Associate Professor of Art, Ceramics, has been appointed to serve as interim chairperson for the Department of Art at Clemson University as of May 16, 2017.


Valerie Zimany

Greg Shelnutt, who has served six years as department chair, has accepted the position of Chair of the Department of Art at the University of Delaware in Wilmington, DE.

Zimany began her career at Clemson in 2010 as the Ceramics Area Coordinator and lead faculty in Ceramics. Zimany teaches both undergraduate and graduate-level Ceramics as well as leads the highly successful Clemson Community Supported Art Creative Inquiry team. She was awarded a 2015-2017 Creativity Professorship in the College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities. A two-time Fulbright Scholar and Japanese Government Scholar, she holds an Master of Fine Arts in Crafts/Ceramics from Kanazawa College of Art in Kanazawa, Japan, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Crafts/Ceramics and Art Education from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, PA.

Accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design, Department of Art at Clemson University offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees in studio art with concentrations in ceramics, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, and sculpture.

The chair provides academic, artistic and administrative leadership and vision to the programs within the department. A national search for a new chair will commence in Fall 2017.

For questions, please contact Valerie Zimany by e-mail at (vzimany@clemson.edu).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC Installs Quilt Block #200 and #201

June 12, 2017

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC celebrated its 200th quilt square, To the Mountains, at the Greater Pickens Chamber of Commerce at 222 W. Main St. in Pickens, SC. For eight years, the Quilt Trail has grown, block by block, into a meaningful part of Upstate South Carolina’s landscape for locals who want to preserve the history and traditions of the area. While the Quilt Trail is built, perpetuated, and maintained by locals with a passion for their history, it is also a unique experience for visitors to the area. The Trail appeals to those who enjoy art, nature, history, crafting, story-telling, and even just taking a car ride through the countryside.

As the UHQT has grown over the years, it has forged a path through the lives of so many in its surrounding communities. The members of the Trail are comprised of people who have had the tradition of quilting passed down to them, those whose created the tradition for themselves, and those who are not quilters but still help make the trail possible in various ways. There are now two teams of over 20 volunteers in Anderson and Oconee Counties and soon Pickens County who contribute over 7,000 hours per year giving presentations, painting quilt squares with members of the community, and finding ways to improve and promote this priceless resource. This art form has woven its way into the hearts of this community and beyond.

The original quilt, To the Mountains, a small landscape piece, was created by Joy duBois of Seneca. Joy met a quilter by the name of Gail Sexton, at the Upcountry Quilters Guild which meets at the Pickens Presbyterian Church in Pickens. Joy subsequently took a class that Gail was teaching in a new landscaping technique at the former local quilt shop, Heirlooms and Comforts. She enjoyed the class and the teacher so much that she went on meeting Gail for weekly sessions where they quilted together. Joy has many quilts in her “stash,” both landscape and appliqued borders that Gail designed and Joy has hand quilted.

When it came time to choose the quilt to adorn the Greater Chamber of Commerce building for the 200th block installment, this landscape quilt of mountains, rivers and a foreground of flowers and a tree was chosen from a group beautiful little landscape quilts by Kimberly Smagala, a life-long friend of Joy’s as well as the newest Chamber Executive Director.

For Kim and Joy, it all began 30 years ago. “My family moved from Texas when I was 5 years old and my baby quilt had shouldered a lot of love and use. My mother started working in a real estate with Jere, Joy’s husband. That is when we first met she mended and refurbished my quilt several times for me as I grew up. Joy has made myself, my mother, and my children many quilts throughout the years, including baby quilts. She and her husband are like family. ”

“The chamber office is the first stop for many visitors who visit our city. It is our hope to highlight more quilts throughout the Main Street corridor and around town as a part of a walking/bike tour. Quilting is part of our rich heritage and we are surrounded by so many talented quilters locally, especially those from the Upcountry Quilters’ Guild. We look forward to not only seeing more renderings of these beautiful quilts throughout downtown Pickens, but also creating a destination spot similar to what Landrum and Westminster, SC have accomplished.”

“A quilt warms the body and the soul, having this remarkable painted quilt panel by these talented artists portraying the beautiful craftsmanship that Joy put into this piece is amazing,” stated Smagala. This quilt panel was funded through the Pickens County ATAX Commission to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail.

201st UHQT Quilt The Cross

The Cross quilt is the 201st quilt added to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail. It is displayed on the Westminster Baptist Church, 212 East Windsor in Westminster, SC. The painted quilt block was sponsored by members of the Westminster Baptist Church. The Cross quilt block was designed by Janet Houts and taught during a quilting retreat at Kanuga Episcopal Camp in Hendersonville, NC attended by Paige Price and Denise McCormick.

Paige and Denise knew it would be perfect for their church and fellow quilters, Deanna DeFoor and Beckie DeFoor. Together they joined efforts and worked to piece and quilt a wall hanging, measuring 30 inches by 42 inches, as a gift to the members of the congregation. It was first displayed in the church on Easter Sunday, 2015. Several member of the church helped to paint the quilt block and it was presented to the congregation on Easter Sunday 2017. Being on the quilt trail allows everyone who passes by to enjoy the beauty of the fabric and painted quilts.

The cross is a Christian symbol that represents Jesus’s victory over sin and death. We are reminded about God and His plan of redemption through the symbolic significance of colors in the Bible. The two main colors of Westminster Baptist Church quilt are blue and gold. Blue is the color of the sky and a reminder of the heavenly realm. It also signifies the Healing Power of God. Gold represents God’s love because His love is more precious and more valuable than all the gold in the world. Love is the gold of God.

Westminster Baptist Church has been in the heart of town for more than 130 years. In the 1870’s, the town of Westminster, named after the original church located in a log building situated on the site of the Westminster First Baptist Church, grew up along the railroad and soon developed into a bustling business area. As the population shifted more toward the commercial area, some members of the church decided to build a church nearer the center of town. In 1884, they established a church ‘in the heart of town’. Now, more than 130 years later, the motto “In the heart of town, with a heart for the people” is still a principle held by its members. Located on E. Windsor Street, the church strives “to reach and develop devoted followers of Jesus Christ who love Him, grow in Him, and serve others in His name.”

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).