Archive for the ‘Upstate SC Visual Arts’ Category

Leo Twiggs, Represented by Hampton III Gallery in Taylors, SC, Wins 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art

August 11, 2018

Orangeburg, SC, artist Leo Twiggs, represented by Hampton III Gallery in Taylors, SC, wins the1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art, sponsored by Society 1858 and the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC.


“Requiem for Mother Emanuel #5”, 2016, by Leo Twiggs; batik; 30 x 24 inches; courtesy of the artist.

Born in the Lowcountry town of St. Stephen, SC, in 1934, Leo Twiggs studied art at Claflin College in Orangeburg and went on to earn a Masters degree from New York University and a doctorate in art education from the University of Georgia. In 1964 he began his thirty-four year teaching career at South Carolina State University. A year later he began experimenting with batik, a wax-resist method of dyeing textiles. He was attracted to the medium for its rich tradition and improvisational nature.

Much of Twiggs’ work explores family history, cultural heritage, and how the past is manifest in contemporary life. His series titled “Requiem for Mother Emanuel” recently traveled throughout the southeast, earning acclaim as a powerful tribute to the nine church members slain during the horrific shooting at Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston.

A reception will be held for Twiggs at the Gibbes Museum of Art on Sept. 19, beginning at 7pm.

Hampton III Gallery is located at 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd., Suite 10, in Taylors, SC, 29687.

For further information call 864/268-2771.

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Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Adds #222 Quilt Block to Trail

August 10, 2018


222 Birchwood Bear’s Paw

The Birchwood Center, off Highway 11 in the far northern part of the Pickens County, SC, was the recipient of a quilt block sponsored through the Pickens County ATAX Grant awarded to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail.

The Birchwood Center for Art and Folk Life was founded in 2000 by Dot Jackson, Gayle Edwards, Tom Johnson, and Starkey Flythe to promote and enhance the study and awareness of the Arts and Humanities in this region. Their mission is to provide a free place to be used as a comfortable sanctuary or retreat to inspire creativity and enhance learning across the curriculum of Arts and Folk Life.  To this end, they have provided a variety of mostly free programs and activities to the public throughout the years. The Bear’s Paw block was placed on the Masters-Southerland House located on the Birchwood Center’s property in the mountains of northern Pickens County, SC, with Table Rock State Park as a backdrop.

The Bear’s Paw Quilt Block was chosen to represent the spirit and mission of the Birchwood Center. In the stories about the Underground Railroad, the Bear Paw was the symbol for a refuge for the slaves to find shelter, food, and safety. One of the founders, Dot Jackson, wrote a prize winning novel, Refuge. While the novel has nothing to do with the Birchwood Center, the title is a reminder of our mission and for the Bear’s Paw symbol on the Underground Railroad.

The Brown Bear is a native to this region and is a popular part of the local culture. In the Native American Spirit world and other mythology, the bear’s extreme power, size, courage, tenacity, confidence, and intelligence along with a touch of curiosity, mother-cub family connections, its gentle nature topped with a splash of cuteness has earned it the following title: The Great Protector and Defender of the peoples’ safety, and their freedom and resourcefulness to create a better life. The bear allows the people to be free to safely create a better life for themselves and their families. The Native Americans also believed that the bear was a messenger for dreams and visions. The Birchwood Board feels that all people who contribute positively to our history and the Arts share most of the bear’s characteristics.

Dot Jackson was a wonderful storyteller and told some wonderful tales about her bear encounters. Several tales were about a bear who loved snooping around at the Birchwood Center. We believe he just loved being around Dot. During the restoration of the Masters-Southerland House, Dot lived in a trailer on the property. After several sightings, that bear (or one bearing a striking resemblance) decided to snoop around under the trailer (called “Paradise” by Dot). It tore off some underpinning on the backside of Paradise and crawled in during the dead of the night. Dot woke to loud bumping noises and much shaking under her bedroom floor. This continued until he got settled in to rest. The bear must have decided that living close to Dot was a good thing. It bumped around under the floor anytime of the day or night. When was it going to come on in for a visit? Dot was concerned that the floor would collapse bringing down a wall. She never knew if that bear was lurking around outside. Dot was not sleeping well. The bear was happy. Dot was NOT. Somebody had to go! You know it was not going to be our feisty, fearless Dot. After a while, someone (maybe Dennis Chastain) volunteered to lure Dot’s bear out from his den under Paradise. He was taken to a more suitable home somewhere in the mountains. Dot was happy. The bear probably missed Dot.

One foggy morning at the Birchwood Center, Dot woke from a deep sleep in the comfort of Paradise to the sounds of loud grunting and other strange noises. She made her way to a front window to peer out in the direction of the noises but could see nothing unusual through the fog. When it got light enough, Dot came out to check out the area of the earlier noise. Well, she found a bear in her car and most of the contents thrown out onto the wet grass! Now, Dot was a lot like that Bear in that she was courageous, fearless, tenacious, and a protector (of her car) so she proceeded to try to get rid of her unwanted passenger. The intruder shared these traits so he was not moving out of her car. Dot was upset. The bear seemed pleased with himself. Since she was not supremely strong like the bear, Dot just went back into Paradise to call for help. In a few minutes she saw the bear slowly getting out of her car carrying the precious red bag that had gone with her everywhere for years. She was sorry to lose it but the bear looked so funny carrying that red bag slowly through the woods like he knew he had something important to take home. Dot could not help laughing at that memory even as she was looking at the mess he had made inside the car. Those paws could do some major damage!

The memories of Dot’s bear tales, along with the symbolism of the Bear, the popularity of this block in the local history, and with the original idea for the Birchwood Center, made choosing the Bear Paw a perfect choice. The Bear Paw Quilt Block represents the traditional quilt block and the colors chosen represent the new modern colors used today. Much of the material used in the block has light, softened dots in the background to represent our late Dot Jackson who was one of our cherished founders of the Birchwood Center.

The traditional Bear Paw with the modern, brightly colored materials comprised of contrasting muted backgrounds came together to make a beautiful quilt block for the Birchwood Center for the Arts and Folk Life. The square was created by Linda Blakeney, who met with the Birchwood’s Board of Directors to choose both the pattern and colors.

For further info call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Adds New Quilt Blocks to Its Ever Expanding Trail

July 28, 2018


#220 Autumn Compass

For more than 40 years, Lynn Brill of Anderson, SC, has been crafting quilts and perfecting her unique creations. After a stroke in January 2012, Lynn lost the use of her right arm. However, with an extension for her machine and the will to learn a new way to continue her quilting, she still makes beautiful quilts and wins ribbons in quilting shows. She and her husband, Glenn, have decided to honor her love of quilting with an UHQT block on their home.

The block chosen by Lynn is Autumn Compass and is a blaze of the glorious colors of autumn, Lynn’s favorite season. Adapted from several quilt designs, Lynn’s Autumn Compass was created in a class by Lynn Kirsch of Racine, Wisconsin. The circle for the Mariner’s Compass was created by drawing a circle around a pizza pan, then divided into quarters, eighths, and sixteenths to make paper foundations. After the compass was completed, it was hand appliqued onto the quilt. The border, comprised of a quilting technique called flying geese, is in greens, rust and gold. Because the Horicon Marsh in Wisconsin is a stopping place for thousands of Canadian geese each fall, Lynn decided to incorporate the flying geese into the border.

The block was installed above the garage door of their Anderson home in celebration of Lynn’s 70th birthday.


#221 Bursting in Air

Bursting in Air is a variation of the classic Greek Square quilt block. It is located on the Six Mile Farmers Market, once the site of the town’s volunteer fire department. This patriotic-themed block was sponsored through a Pickens County Accommodations Tax grant awarded to the Greater Pickens County Chamber of Commerce. Kim Smagala, Director and the Chamber selected Six Mile to receive this block to enhance the cluster of quilts already in the area.

When the town of Six Mile was contacted with the news that they had been chosen to receive a quilt block, Mayor Roy Stoddard chose this red, white and blue block to honor the four Congressional Medal of Honor recipients who grew up in the Six Mile and Liberty communities. It will serve as a reminder of the bravery and sacrifice of these men, who gave their all for their country. They are: Furman D. Smith, US Army, medal awarded January 17, 1945; William McWhorter, US Army, medal awarded September 27, 1945; Charles H. Barker, US Army, medal awarded June 13, 1955; James D. Howe, US Marines, medal awarded September 15, 1971. The stories of these men and their heroism can be found on the town of Six Mile’s website at (www.sixmilesc.org).

This patriotic themed square is modeled after one that quilter Doris Land included in a sampler quilt made for her son Karl Tubbs. Doris acquired the fabric and pattern for this square from Viking Sew ‘n’ Quilt, now in Maulden, SC, when she completed one of the Carolina Shop Hops. That year twelve quilt shops in the region participated, each offering its own pattern and fabric packet to use in a patriotic themed quilt. Doris was relatively new to quilting and assumed that all she had to do with each packet was sew the pre-cut pieces together. To her surprise, there were no little squares, triangles, and rectangles cut and ready to sew in the packet—just large strips of fabric and the directions for cutting. She laughs at her beginner’s mistake.

After joining a quilt guild she learned about their efforts to make Quilts of Valor for veterans. She was inspired to use her Shop Hop squares in a Quilt of Valor for her son Karl who served with the Army National Guard in the Iraq war. Doris’s sampler quilt uses the squares, including Bursting in Air, to frame a center Lone Star medallion. The quilt is machine pieced and machine quilted.

Doris resides in Pickens County and belongs to the Upcountry Quilters Guild and the Swamp Rabbit Guild in Traveler’s Rest.

For further info visit (www.uhqt.org).

Greenville Center for Creative Arts in Greenville, SC, Offers an Art Supply Flea Market – Aug. 25, 2018

July 28, 2018

The Greenville Center for Creative Arts in Greenville, SC, is askng artists & art students to mark your calendars for the Art Supply Flea Market, to be held on Saturday, August 25, 2018, from 10am – 3pm.

Artists, we need you! Clean out your studios and donate your gently used art supplies.

Drop off your donated supplies on Friday, Aug. 17 or Saturday, August 18, from 11am – 2pm at Greenville Center for Creative Arts. You may request a gift in-kind form for your contributions.

GCCA Members may also sell higher priced items ($40+) by consignment at the Flea Market, with 50% of the sale price returning to the artist.

What is the Art Supply Flea Market?
Artists and students of all ages and stages will find great bargains on gently used and new supplies in all mediums. Come shop for deals on paints, papers, tools, brushes, equipment, frames, display racks, and more.
Who is invited?
Anyone can donate supplies and materials!
What donations will be accepted?
Gently used or new art supplies and materials. Examples: paintbrushes, pencil sharpeners, viable paints and inks, printmaking equipment, mat cutters, papers, etc.

What donations will not be accepted?
Examples: Artwork (unfinished or finished), home goods (lamps, blinds, rugs, etc.), house paint, broken items, dried paints.

If you have questions, please e-mail (info@artcentergreenville.org).

Proceeds will benefit Art School scholarships for youth to attend classes, summer camps, and workshops at the Art Center.

Spread the word! Forward this info to high school students, art teachers, college students, and artists of all stages!

Cash accepted. $10 minimum on debit/credit purchases

The Greenville Center for Creative Arts is located at 101 Abney Street, Greenville, SC 29611.

For further info call 864/735-3948 or visit (www.artcentergreenville.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC Adds Another Quilt Block to the Trail in Anderson, SC

June 27, 2018

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC adds quilt block #219 Drunken Sailor to the ever expanding Quilt Trail.


Descendants of Ida Bell Nelson Turner, Quilt Maker, Variation of the “Drunken Sailor” Pattern. Created near Shellhorn, AL, around 1910/20.
Left front to rear: Diann Simms (granddaughter) and Nelson Brooks (great-grandson)
Right front to rear: Simms Brooks (great-granddaughter), Holland Simms (grandson), Eden Brooks (great-great-grandaughter) and Walt Brooks (great-grandson)

Experienced quilters will recognize Ida Bell Nelson Turner’s lovely, complex quilt as an example of the Drunkard’s Path pattern. This is one of the more challenging quilt blocks to construct because of its curved piecing and complicated block layout. Turner’s quilt is distinguished by its intricate arrangement of blocks and its balanced placement of color. Its block layout is more complicated than other common arrangements. Its bright early 20th century fabrics make this Drunkard’s Path an especially cheerful quilt.

Turner likely made this quilt sometime after 1920 while living with her husband, Newman Sebastian Turner, in Pike County, AL. She lived in close proximity to her many relatives and friends who joined with her to complete quilts for each other. Turner’s granddaughter Diann Simms—the owner of this quilt and sponsor of this block—says Ida told her she used to “put the pieces together” and then family and friends would gather and quilt. According to Turner, not everyone in the group got a completed quilt each year. They “took turn about.” While Ida’s quilt is admired for its beauty and craftsmanship today, its original purpose was covering beds and keeping warm. Like many quilts of the early 20th century, this quilt is backed with bright yellow fabric. The quilt top has a border of blue and bright yellow.

The Drunkard’s Path’s zig zag pattern of curved pieces resembles the path a drunk might walk after a night of drinking. Some quilt historians note that the Drunkard’s Path pattern was popular among quilters during the nation’s experiment with Prohibition. These historians believe that women who supported the temperance movement may have used this pattern to express their support of the anti-alcohol cause. There is, however, some disagreement among quilt historians about the theory’s validity. Turner’s granddaughter Diann doubts that her grandmother made this quilt as a political statement but thinks she’d have found its name, Drunkard’s Path, funny since Ida abstained from alcohol all her life.

Turner was born in 1880 and died in 1966. She is buried near Shelhorn, AL. This quilt block is located at 66 Oleander Drive, Anderson, SC.

For further information about the Quilt Trail call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Hub City Empty Bowls Celebrates 10 Years with a New Event in Spartanburg, SC – Sept. 28, 2018

June 7, 2018

Hub City Empty Bowls 2018 marks 10 years of pottery bowl-making as a way to raise funds that feed hungry people in Spartanburg, SC, who are not sure where their next meal is coming from.

To celebrate 10 years of helping the public make thousands of hand-shaped pottery bowls and donating tens of thousands of dollars to local charity that provides food to the needy, the lead agency Carolina Clay Artists will add a special event to its lineup of activities. In addition to three bowl-making sessions and Soup Day, “10 Years of Filling Empty Bowls” will be a ticketed party on Friday, Sept. 28, 2018 at Indigo Hall in downtown Spartanburg. Patrons will purchase $50 advance tickets that will admit them to the event and will include first dibs on selecting pottery bowls (one bowl is included in the ticket price); beer, wine, and finger foods; and a silent auction. The event starts at 5:30pm and ends at 8pm.

Tickets can be purchased by calling Traci Kennedy at 864/585-9167, ext. 202 or e-mailing her at (Director@TotalMinistries.org).

“This is a special year, and we wanted to do something special to celebrate,” Hub City Empty Bowls 2018 Chair Bruce Bowyer said. “After nine years of doing this, we’ve noticed some things that people really like about Hub City Empty Bowls. They like the pottery bowls. They like looking at them and getting the ones they really want based on shape, color, and personality. They like being together. People really have a good time when they attend bowl-making sessions or Soup Day. They like coming together for a common cause. So, we are giving them another opportunity to enjoy what they like the most. The night before Soup Day, we’ll host this party for people who want the best selection of bowls and who want another reason to get together in their efforts to end local hunger. I think a good time will be had by all, and, of course, all of the money will be given to TOTAL Ministries, the local faith-based charity that provides food to local people in dire financial straits.”

In recent years, Hub City Empty Bowls as averaged donating about $33,000 a year to TOTAL Ministries, which now helps with the administration of the annual event, freeing members of Carolina Clay Artists to focus their efforts on actual pottery making.

“Carolina Clay Artists has filled many empty stomachs in Spartanburg in the past nine years,” TOTAL’s Director Traci Kennedy said. “So many people — not just the homeless but average people who have lost jobs or fallen on hard times — have been saved from the pangs of hunger because someone made a pottery bowl and someone else bought it. Hub City Empty Bowls is a grassroots effort that has struck a nerve in Spartanburg. It is much anticipated and much loved. It is a creative program, it is an inclusive program, it is an effective program. Look at it this way: a $20 pottery bowl produces about 100 pounds of food from the local food bank. One hundred pounds of food can feed a family of four for about a week.”

According to Feeding America, a leading national agency dedicated to stopping hunger, about 13.6 percent or 39,690 people in Spartanburg are “food insecure,” which is usually defined as people who aren’t sure if they will have their next meal. The State of South Carolina has a rate of 15.3 percent or 746,810 people out of the total population of 4,896,146, based on 2017 statistics.

“Spartanburg may not be the worst county in the state for food insecurity, but we certainly have a problem,” Kennedy said. “I see it every week as people who need help line up outside our doors.”

The first bowl-making session will be Saturday, June 16, 2018, at Spartanburg Art Museum (SAM), housed at Chapman Cultural Center. The morning session will be 10am to noon; the afternoon session will be 1-3pm. Anyone can attend, and there is no charge. All clay, studio space, and professional instruction are donated. This is an excellent family event.

The second bowl-making session will be Saturday, July 7, 2018, at West Main Artists Co-op, from 1-4pm. The third and final bowl-making session will be Saturday, July 14, at SAM, from 10am-noon and 1-3pm.

Soup Day will be Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, from 11am-4pm at Indigo Hall. Hundreds of finished pottery bowls will be on display and available for purchase/donation at $20 each. Included in the day’s activities will be about two dozen gourmet soups donated by local restaurants. The meal will include tea, water, and bread. Also, there will be live music.

“Bowl making is the creative part of Hub City Empty Bowl,” Bowyer said. “Individuals and families come to experience pottery or to scratch a creative itch. Soup Day is when it all comes together. I’ve seen people get a dozen or more bowls at a time. They use them for Christmas gifts, and I know of one lady who gets them to be used at her Thanksgiving meal. Then they all congregate to eat soup, listen to the music, and feel good about helping others. It really is one of Spartanburg’s most heartwarming events.”

This year’s sponsors are West Main Artists Co-op, Spartanburg Art Museum, Chapman Cultural Center, Allegra Printing, JM Smith Corp., and Chris Williams.

Empty Bowls is an international phenomenon that uses art to fight hunger in local communities. It started in 1990, when Michigan high school art teacher John Hartom wanted to create an outreach program for his students to use art as a means to raise money that would be used to feed local citizens. From there, the concept spread globally, with each community tweaking the concept to fit its unique circumstances. Most communities engage local potters to help citizens make pottery bowls that are eventually sold at a public event, such Hub City Empty Bowls’s Soup Day. Other communities use different types of art and/or different fundraising events. There is no centralized authority: each community coordinates its program based on the original concept but individualizes it to suit its ways, means, and goals.

For more information about “10 Years of Filling Empty Bowls” or Hub City Empty Bowls, please visit online (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Adds #216 to the Quilt Trail

June 7, 2018

The UHQT’s latest addition to the Trail in Pickens County is number 216 an 8×8 rendition of the traditional 1930s Puss-in-a-Corner quilt pattern, also known as Kansas City Star and Puss in Boots (1935). The design was also featured in the Aunt Martha series of Quilt Designs, ca. 1952. The quilt block is located at 446 Dacusville Highway Easley, SC.

This gorgeous family quilt was made by Hattie Porter Willis, nee Rampey, who was born and grew up in Liberty, SC. She created this quilt in 1954 with assistance from her sisters and friends who gathered after church services or when they were visiting the family to complete this piece. The quilt, when completed, was gifted to Wallace, (Hattie’s grandson), and Faye Rogers, on the occasion of their wedding. Wallace was also born in Liberty and then moved to Easley after his marriage.

Since that time, the quilt has been handed down to Wallace’s son, Bart Rogers, and his wife Kim. It is installed on a small barn on their property in Easley, SC. This property on Dacusville Highway was originally a grist mill owned by the father of Sarah Hamilton. Two of the millstones from the grist mill are displayed at the Hagood Mill in Pickens County. Sarah Hamilton gifted the property, as well as other parcels to the Easley Baptist Hospital. The Rogers, Bart & Kim purchased the property from the hospital in March of 2015 and have lived there with their family since that date. The old farm is adjacent to the Easley Baptist Park and Walking Trail and the block can be viewed from the park.

For further information about the Quilt Trail call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Adds Two New Quilt Blocks to the Trail

May 31, 2018

The 213th quilt block “Mai’aIho Lena – Our Beautiful Land” is inspired by the traditional quilts of Hawaii and is based on a quilt made by well-known local fiber artist Bonnie Ouellette. This block is found at Gateway Arts Center, 213 E. Windsor Street, Westminster, SC, and was commissioned by the Gateway Arts Council.

Ouellette’s first trip to Hawaii inspired her fascination with the special art of Hawaiian quilting. She has since traveled to Hawaii more than thirty times and has great respect for the artistry and skill of native quilters. Traditional Hawaiian quilts are generally characterized by their symmetrical designs which reflect the unique natural elements of the islands. Her quilt incorporates the ulu—breadfruit—into its design. The breadfruit is one of the foods that sustained Polynesian travelers on their remarkable ocean journeys. Generally, these quilts are constructed of a colored solid fabric (often green or red) on a white background. Modern quilters, however, such as Ouellette, sometimes deviate from this tradition. An elaborate design is cut from the colored fabric, much the way paper snowflakes are cut from a single sheet of paper. Then the fabric design is sewn to the background fabric using the needle-turn appliqué method. Finally, the piece is completed by echo quilting around the appliqué. In the true Hawaiian tradition, “Mai’aIho Lena – Our Beautiful Land”, is completely hand-sewn and hand-quilted and incorporates Bonnie’s own hand-dyed fabrics.

It is fitting that the Gateway Arts Council has chosen Bonnie Ouellette’s work for this quilt block. Her skill as a fiber artist is well recognized throughout the Upstate art and quilting community. She is best known for her often whimsical and heavily beaded art quilts. Ouellette is a member of a number of fiber art groups, including Thread Heads and Hi Fiber and her creative spirit continues to nurture the art community. Her work has traveled throughout the United States as well as internationally and has been featured in fiber art magazines such as Quilting Arts.

Melody and Alan Davis, owners of Gateway Arts Center where this block is located, are, like Ouellette, active promoters of the arts in Oconee County and the Upstate. They are pleased to have her work displayed on their building.

The hand painted quilt block was installed on the front of the Gateway Arts Center in Westminster, SC.

Announcing #215 “Around the World”

The view of Ernest and Flo Riley’s porch at 21 Westwind Court, Seneca, SC, has been enhanced by the addition of an historic, painted quilt block. A small, framed piece of the original quilt, created in the 1930s by Flo Riley’s grandmother, Mary Beardon, hangs in the dining room of the home. Mary was born and raised in Horse Cove, NC. She met and married a builder and farmer, William Walker from Oakway, (Seneca).

This quilt was pieced in a star pattern, stuffed with cotton grown on the family farm and carded by hand. Quilting was done at a Quilting Bee, where Mary was assisted by her Aunt Ella Beardon and others. Mary was noted for her hot gingerbread with lemon sauce and locust brew. She also played violin, banjo, guitar and piano.

This quilt was certified and archived by the South Carolina State Museum during the time period from 1983-85, when the McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina sent out a call for historic quilts from throughout the state. All the accepted quilts received were cataloged; stating maker, material, date and pattern at that time. Pattern names included Trip Around the World, Bow Tie and Sands of Time. After the certification, this quilt was cut up, framed and given to each of Mary’s eleven grandchildren by the aunts of the family and keepers of the quilt, Helen and Flora Beardon in the 1990’s.

The framed artifact now graces the home of E, (Ernest) and Flo, (Flora Helen) Riley. “E” has retired from a teaching, (History), and administration career in the Oconee County Schools, as well as serving on Seneca City Council for a number of years. Flo, grand-daughter of the original quilter, Mary Hill Beardon, was the Executive Director of the Michelin Career Center at Clemson University.

For further information about the Quilt Trail call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Cherokee Alliance of Visual Artists in Gaffney, SC, Calls for Entries in “Anything Goes!” – Deadline is May 21, 2018

May 6, 2018

The Cherokee Alliance of Visual Artists (CAVA) is a non-profit organization located in the Gaffney Visitors Center and Art Gallery in Gaffney, SC. CAVA’s exhibit, “Anything Goes!” is open to local and area artists. The exhibit is a prelude Gaffney’s annual Peach Festival, July 20 – August 4.

Dates:
Entry form and entry fee: May 14 – May 21
Delivery of art: May 26, 28, 29, 30 and 31
Exhibit: June 7 – July 31, 2018
Reception: Thursday, July 12, 6 – 8pm
Pick-up art: July 21, 23, 24, and 25

Entry Form: On index-sized cards, send your name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, title of work, size of work, and price or insurance value if not for sale to CAVA Gallery: “Anything Goes!”, 210 W. Frederick Street, Gaffney, SC 29341.

Entry Fee and Sale of Works: Entry fee is $20.00 for one or two pieces; there is no fee for CAVA members. Works may be for sale. A commission of 30% for non-members will be charged. Artists will be paid at the end of the exhibit.

Delivery and Pick Up are the responsibility of the artist. If hand-delivery is not possible, pieces may be shipped. Return shipment must be included along with the entry fee. Shipped entries must be received by Monday, May 21. The gallery is open weekdays 9am – 5pm and Saturdays, 9am – 1pm. Call CAVA at 864/489-9119 or 864/489-9817 for questions concerning delivery and return.

Specifications
–Artists eighteen and older may submit two pieces for exhibition, both two and three dimensional; all works submitted will be displayed.
–2-D works must be wired for hanging. No saw-tooth or clip hangers.
–The Gallery will try to accommodate all submissions. However, anything over 48” square or 30 pounds might be problematic for exhibition.
–Works must remain on display until the close of the exhibit.

Awards: $1000.00 in awards including a $50.00 People’s Choice Award. Additional awards may be available. Juror is Jane Allen Nodine, Professor of Art and Gallery Director at the University of South Carolina Upstate. Her exhibition record and awards are extensive.

Liability: CAVA will use the utmost care in handling the artwork. It is the artist’s responsibility to insure the work during transport. Works will be insured by CAVA during exhibition. For publicity purposes, CAVA reserves the right to photograph and reproduce any entry submitted. The receipt of an entry in the show constitutes an agreement by the artist to the conditions set forth in this prospectus.

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail Installs #210 Bee Well Honey Quilts in Pickens, SC

May 6, 2018

Donna and Kerry Owen, owners and operators of the Bee Well Honey business in Pickens, SC, are now also the proud owners of an array of quilt blocks on their Natural Market & Gift Store. The original quilts were fashioned by a variety of quilters and reproduced in graphic form, to display on the exterior of the business that will be enjoyed by visitors to downtown Pickens, the Doodle Trail and Park. These quilts were supported through the Pickens County ATAX Commission grant to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail.

“Buzz In” a quilt square created by Joy duBois and Sue Hackett, was made at the request of the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail to honor the Owens’ honey business. Joy found a pattern that everyone loved, pieced and quilted a lovely wall hanging that is now hanging inside the market. Sue Hackett, a quilter and member of the Oconee County Quilt Trail Production Team, did the embroidery on the quilted wall hanging. Joy loved the square so much that she has also produced the entire quilt for fun!

“Star Puzzle”, a vintage quilt from Donna’s side of the family, was discovered on a shelf at her mother, Pat Fisher’s, home in Rosman, NC. It was quilted by Donna’s grandmother, Alma Galloway Bruner, whom she called “Nanny.” Alma was born in Transylvania County, NC, on December 24, 1912. She married Addison William Bruner and lived on Highway 64 in that same county. The Bruners had 3 children, Pat Fisher, who was Donna’s mother, Jimmy who died in a drowning accident in his early 20s, and Bill Bruner who is a preacher at Rocky Bottom Baptist Church in Pickens County. “Star Puzzle” was made during the 1940-50s, squares sewn by Alma and quilted with the help of Geniva Holcombe and Madari Powell.

Donna’s fondest memories of Alma’s quilts were their comfort and heaviness while sleeping at her Nanny’s home, where there was no central heating. “The weight of those quilts would make me feel toasty on the coldest of nights and made me feel safe during summer thunderstorms!”

“Ode to a Sunflower”, was created by Vivian Perry, a member of the Upcountry Quilters’ Guild in Pickens County. Vivian and her husband, Tommy, moved to the upstate 5 years ago and live in Easley. She bought a long-arm quilting machine in 2004 and began quilting for customers, which she continued for 12 years. She now makes T-shirt quilts, has an Etsy shop called EggMoneyQuilts and an internet business: (https://tshirtquiltcompany.com).

Vivian’s inspiration for the “Sunflower Quilt” came from her love of the outdoors. She grew up in the country and she’d rather be outside than inside! She has always loved how sunflowers seem to stretch to soak in all the sunshine. There’s no pattern for this quilt; Vivian doesn’t use patterns. She prefers to make it up as she goes!

“Landscape” created by the well-known art quilter, Dottie Moore, whose work can be found in fine galleries throughout the world, was found at Boxwood Manor, the home of Annette Buchanan, during a UHQT Board meeting. Kim Smagala, Director of the Greater Pickens Chamber of Commerce, took one look at this tiny wonder, and said, “We have to paint this!”

Dottie has been creating what she calls visual conversations with fabric and thread since the 1980s. She is inspired by nature and every piece she fashions includes some part or all of a tree. Dottie lives in Rock Hill, SC. She teaches, lectures throughout the country and is the founder of Piecing a Quilt of Life, an international project dedicated to empowering senior women by recognizing their creative abilities. Her web site is (http://www.dottiemoore.com).

Bee Well Honey is known across the Southeast as a producer of delicious raw honey. They also offer a full line of beekeeping supplies. Kerry Owen was introduced to honeybees as a child growing up in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. His father, grandfather and neighbors had beehives or “bee gums” as a source of honey for the family. “You know sometimes, you just trip and stumble into the path you’re supposed to take,” Kerry explains, “but that is exactly what happened to me and my family. Bee Well Honey started in our kitchen, expanded into the garage, then into a rough sawn lumber barn and now we have buildings and honeybees scattered all across South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia. We are still paying our dues and if it where not for my beekeeper friends there would be no Bee Well Honey and I will always remember that.”

Bee Well Honey and the Owens family offer a full line of beekeeping supplies, honeybee packages, queens and 100% pure raw honey, as well as a natural market featuring organic and natural foods. For further info visit (http://www.beewellhoneynaturalmarket.com).

For further info about the Quilt Trail call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).