Posts Tagged ‘Carolina Clay Artists’

Hub City Empty Bowls in Spartanburg, SC, Says Soup’s On – Oct. 28, 2017

September 30, 2017

Hub City Empty Bowls will host its annual Soup Day, on Oct. 28, 2017, from 11am-4pm, at the Chapman Cultural Center, to raise money and awareness for hunger in Spartanburg, SC, where about 16 percent of the people are not sure where their next meal is coming from. Spearheaded by Carolina Clay Artists, Soup Day is a community event where citizens can make $15 donations to receive locally handmade pottery bowls and a simple meal of soup, bread, tea, and the fellowship of others who want to make Spartanburg a better place to live.

All money raised will be given to TOTAL Ministries, a local nonprofit charity that helps Spartanburg citizens in dire financial straits. Last year, 2016, Hub City Empty Bowls gave more than $33,000 to TOTAL Ministries. For every bowl taken by a patron, 83 pounds of food can be secured for those in need.

In addition to several hundred pottery bowls to choose from and about two dozen soups donated by local restaurants, patrons will be able to enjoy live music, a silent auction, and a drum circle on an autumn day.

During the summer, Hub City Empty Bowls hosted three public bowl-making events, where the general public was able to make handmade pottery bowls at no cost. All supplies, space, and instruction were donated. These were wholesome, creative, and well attended community events that welcomed everyone, even children who made some of the most endearing bowls. The hand-shaped bowls were left in at the host studios – West Main Artists Co-Op and Spartanburg Art Museum – for touch-ups, painting, and firing. In addition, several experienced and professional potters donated bowls, many of which were wheel thrown and of professional quality. All of those bowls will be available on Soup Day. Many people do their Christmas shopping at Soup Day, securing gifts that have significant social and creative meaning.

Empty Bowls is a worldwide charitable and social phenomenon without any oversight or headquarters. It was started in 1990-91 by a high school art teacher who wanted to involve his students in an art-based community project of making pottery bowls that could be used to raise money to feed the poor. From that humble beginning, the concept spread around the world, taking on many different aspects, but always keeping locally made pottery bowls as the source of the fundraising.

For more information about Hub City Empty Bowls’s 2017 Soup Day, please visit online at (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com).

This program is funded in part by Chapman Cultural Center, its donors, the County and City of Spartanburg, and the South Carolina Arts Commission that receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of SC.

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Hub City Empty Bowls in Spartanburg, SC, Launches 2017 Program

May 31, 2017

Hub City Empty Bowls – an annual fundraiser that uses handmade pottery bowls to feed hungry Spartanburg citizens – has set the 2017 dates for its well-attended events. There will be three regularly scheduled bowl-making events: Saturday, July 15, 2017, at 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s pottery studio at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC; Thursday, July 20, 2017, from 5-8pm at West Main Artists Co-Op, during ArtWalk; and Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017, at 10am-noon and 1-3pm at Chapman Cultural Center. Soup Day will be Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017, from 11am-4pm at Chapman Cultural Center. All events are free and family friendly.

Hub City Empty Bowls is a localized fundraiser inspired the international Empty Bowls decentralized program. Locally, the program’s spearhead Carolina Clay Artists coordinates public bowl-making sessions. At no charge, citizens of all ages are given supplies, tools, space, and instructions on how to make hand-shaped pottery bowls. Those unfinished bowls are left at the venue to be painted and fired by experienced potters. Bowls often made by children can be simple, primitive, and charming. Others made by experienced potters can be precise, intricate, and sophisticated.

With hundreds of bowls created by local citizens, Carolina Clay Artists then hosts Soup Day, an event where patrons receive the bowls – each for a $15 donation to TOTAL Ministries, a local charity that provides food and other resources to people in financial crisis. In addition to receiving bowls, the patrons can enjoy a meal of soup, bread, and tea donated by the community’s leading restaurants, hear live music, bid in a silent auction, and enjoy the fellowship and comradery of knowing they are helping to feed people in need. In 2016, the Carolina Clay Artists donated a record-breaking $33,000 to TOTAL Ministries.

“Coordinating Hub City Empty Bowls is a massive undertaking,” 2017 Chairman Bruce Bowyer said. “People want to know as soon as possible about our dates so they can plan accordingly. Some people come to all of the bowl-making sessions and Soup Day. Plus, by setting the dates early, we can better handle the large crowds of people who normally show up. It is not unusual for us to have several hundred people come to a bowl-making session. And come Soup Day, we’ll see more than a thousand.”

Despite the crowds, it is seldom anyone has to wait to make a bowl or enjoy Soup Day. Space, volunteers, and experience are plentiful enough to keep everyone engaged.

Carolina Clay Artists is a local group of hobbyist and professional potters who come together monthly to share ideas, hold workshops and demos, and tour pottery studios to see other artists’ work and learn new ideas. It is open to all who have an interest in learning and sharing about pottery. Annual dues are $35. Hub City Empty Bowls is the group’s annual charity fundraising event to help feed the hungry.

TOTAL Ministries got its start in 1982 as Project Eat. Founder Dannie Horne saw an unemployment rate of 9.7% and that many people in Spartanburg County were hungry. During the first 17 months of Project Eat’s existence, $190,000 of groceries were distributed in an effort to alleviate that problem. In 1983, TOTAL Ministries of Spartanburg County, Inc. was incorporated by 12 Spartanburg churches to carry on the work of Project Eat. Since then, additional emergency services have been added to the TOTAL mission in an effort to help those in need. For those in need, TOTAL can help with utility services, food, and medications.

Empty Bowls started in 1990 by Michigan art teacher John Hartom, who organized a charitable event to give his art students a way to make a personal difference in the lives of others in their community. Hartom’s students made pottery bowls in their high school art classes, and the finished products were then used as individual serving pieces for a fundraising meal of soup and bread. From that simple beginning, Empty Bowls has spread around the world, taking root in communities both small and large. Spartanburg had its first Empty Bowls program in 2009. All Empty Bowls efforts are locally based with all proceeds going to a local charity with a mission to alleviate hunger in its community. None of the money raised leaves the community. The lead agency, Carolina Clay Artists, donates all of its time and talents, and receives no monetary benefit. Locally, all proceeds go to TOTAL Ministries.

For more information about Hub City Empty Bowls, please visit online at (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com) or call 864.706-3739 or 864/585-9167.

Hub City Empty Bowls to Feed the Public and the Needy in Spartanburg, SC, During Soup Day – Sept. 26, 2015

September 13, 2015

Hub City Empty Bowls’s 7th annual Soup Day will be Saturday, Sept. 26, 2015, from 11am-4pm, at Chapman Cultural Center, in Spartanburg, SC, with a goal to feed both the socially responsible public and the community’s most needy citizens.

On Soup Day, more than 1,500 handmade pottery bowls will be available for purchase-donations of $15 each. Participants will then enjoy unlimited gourmet soup provided by more than 20 local restaurants. In addition, the event will feature continuous live music, a silent auction, and drum circles through out the day. The money raised will be given to TOTAL Ministries, a faith-based non-profit agency that provides assistance to Spartanburg’s most needy citizens. Last year, Hub City Empty Bowls, which is spearheaded by Carolina Clay Artists, gave a record-breaking $22,500 to TOTAL Ministries.

“This is one of Spartanburg’s most respected and enjoyable fundraisers,” Nancy Williamson, Empty Bowls’s chairwoman said. “It touches people in so many personal ways. It appeals to the creative community because of the pottery bowl-making. It appeals to shoppers who want unique handmade pottery for a great price. It appeals to foodies, who want all-you-can-eat gourmet soup. And it appeals to the socially responsible citizens who see this as a grassroots way to help make the world a better place. Plus it is a lot of fun on every level. What better way to spend a Saturday than coming together for a good cause, hearing great music, eating the best soups to be found in the city, banging on a drum, and taking home a few pottery bowls? The fellowship is amazing.”

For the past three months, Carolina Clay Artists led public bowl-making sessions in Spartanburg Art Museum’s Art School and at West Main Artists Co-op. These have been free events, where anyone could make pottery bowls for Soup Day. The clay and professional instruction were free. Those bowls were then glazed and fired.

Come Saturday, Sept. 26, more than 1,500 colorful bowls of all shapes and sizes will be laid out in the lobby of Chapman Cultural Center’s theater. “When we open the doors, there is a bit of mad rush by some people to get first dibs,” Williamson said. “It all depends on what you are looking for. If you want primitive child-like bowls, we have them. If you want professional bowls, we have them. And we have everything in between, and some people get stacks of them for Christmas presents. It is an impressive sight to see all of the bowls laid out on as many tables as we can cram into the lobby.”

After you get your bowls, you are invited to eat all of the soup you want, provided by restaurants stationed around the room. “You are discouraged from eating out of the pottery bowls,” Williamson said. “They are clean but just not clean enough to eat out of until you take them home and wash them. We’ll have plenty of paper bowls to eat out of.” Also provided will be bread, tea, and water.

Throughout the day, various local musicians will provide continuous live music. There will also be a silent auction of donated items, many of which are pottery. Everyone is invited to participate in the drum circle.

“It is just a fun day,” Williamson said.

“It is a very important day for the community’s needy,” Traci Kennedy, Executive Director of TOTAL Ministries, said. “When someone gives us $20,000, we know we can feed a lot people who need it. In Spartanburg County about 43,000 people each day are in danger of going hungry, many of whom are children and elderly. With the money that Hub City Empty Bowls raised last year, we fed nearly 10,000 people. That’s a pretty good dent in the problem. We cannot thank Hub City Empty Bowls enough.”

This year’s sponsors are Chris Williams, Carolina Clay Artists, Chapman Cultural Center, West Main Artists Co-op, Spartanburg Art Museum, Action Printing, and Wheresville Productions.

The musicians will be Daniel Z, Fayssoux McLean and David Ezell, 2 Daves, mark Miller, Frank Walker, and drum circles led by Melisa Emkjer.

The restaurants and food providers will be Willy Taco, Fatz, Sun King, Cribbs Kitchen, Cribbs Catering, Gerhards, Farmer’s Table, Sparks Fire Inspired Grill, II Samuels, Palmetto Palate, Lime Leaf, Moveable Feasts, Renato’s, Basil’s, McClellan’s Urban Eatery, Andre Nguyen, Garner’s, NuWay, Wild Aces, Mon Amie, Southern BBQ, Episcopal Church of the Advent Young Adults, The Beacon, Cakehead Bakery, Little River Roasting Co., Long Horn’s, Chick-fil-A, and Wade’s.

This program is supported in part by The Arts Partnership of Greater Spartanburg, its donors, the County and City of Spartanburg and the South Carolina Arts Commission that receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina.

For more information, please contact Nancy Williamson at 864/621-2768 or visit (HubCityEmptyBowls.com).

Hub City Empty Bowls Raises $22,500 to End Hunger in Spartanburg, SC

December 31, 2014

Hub City Empty Bowls recently donated an additional $14,100 to TOTAL Ministries, bringing the sum for 2014 to $22,500. The money was made one hand-made clay bowl at a time in an effort to eliminate hunger in the Spartanburg community.

“The community seems to have really embraced this event, coming out to make the bowls, then coming back for ‘Soup Day’ to buy the bowls,” Nancy Williamson, chair of Hub City Empty Bowls, said.

For months, Carolina Clay Artists, a group of local potters, encouraged other potters and the general public to make and donate bowls at bowl-making events held mostly at Chapman Cultural Center and West Main Artists Co-op. These unfinished bowls were then glazed, fired, and used on “Soup Day,” when for a $15 donation, patrons select a pottery bowl to keep and enjoy gourmet soup from some of the best restaurants in town. Each bowl required a $15 donation, and some patrons bought several.

Sponsors for 2014 included: Chris Williams of Clay King, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg Art Museum, West Main Artists Co-op, Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Spartanburg Regional Healthcare Foundation, Action Printing, Wheresville Productions, and Carolina Clay Artists. Additionally, funds were received from individual donors to help pay for overhead expenses and for opening an account at Spartanburg County Foundation. This account provides Hub City Empty Bowls with a tax-exempt umbrella.

“We are just so grateful for every sponsor and donor who contributed,” Williamson said. “We had increased expenses this year, yet, we were able to pay all of our expenses, set up the fund with Spartanburg County Foundation, and increase the net donation to TOTAL Ministries by $4,000 over last year. Having the tax-exempt status helps us build our capacity to raise funds and improves our position to apply for larger grants and sponsorships for future years.”

The $22,500 (net) given to TOTAL Ministries is a record amount for Hub City Empty Bowls. In 2009, the donation to the Soup Kitchen was $10,000; in 2011, $6,000 to Mobile Meals; in January 2012, $6,677 to TOTAL Ministries; in November 2012, $12,000 to the Soup Kitchen; and in 2013, $18,593 to TOTAL Ministries. The goal was to make 1200 bowls for 2014; 1500 bowls were actually made.

Local restaurants and musicians contributed to the project’s success. Delicious gourmet soups, breads, and beverages were donated by local restaurants. These included: II Samuels, Andre Nguyen, Basil’s, Bull Hawg’s, Chef  Bill McClellan Catering Services, Cribb’s Catering, Cribb’s Kitchen, Farmer’s Table, Fatz (Pottery Road), Garner’s, Gerhard’s, Lime Leaf, Monsoon Noddle House, Moveable Feast, NuWay Restaurant and Lounge, Palmetto Palate, Renato’s, Sparks Fire Inspired Grille at Marriott, Sun King, Wild Ace Pizza and Pub, Willy Taco, Cakehead Bakery, Chick-fil-A, Little River Roasting Company, Long Horn’s, The Beacon, and Wade’s.

Mark Miller of Wheresville Productions recruited local musicians who donated their talents. Participants included Anna V, Fayssoux, Not Even Brothers, Grey Ally, Josie Pettit Band, and the Brianna Hamilton Band. Melisa Emkjer led drum circles that added to the grassroots environment.

TOTAL Ministries was the beneficiary of Hub City Empty Bowls for the second year in a row. Staff, volunteers, and board members from TOTAL Ministries participated in the bowl-making events, worked “Soup Day” and recruited the restaurants.

“The folks from TOTAL Ministries were with us every step of the way,” Williamson said. “We asked a lot of them, and they did not hesitate to work with us.”

“TOTAL Ministries is forever grateful to Hub City Empty Bowls for making us the beneficiary of their efforts,” Traci Kennedy, Executive Director of  TOTAL Ministries, said. “This money is already being put to good use… feeding Spartanburg citizens who would go hungry otherwise. Empty Bowls is a Godsend to us. We can’t say ‘thank you’ enough.”

For folks who missed Soup Day, there is still a chance to purchase a pottery bowl made for Hub City Empty Bowl 2014. Mary and Gerhard Grommer at Gerhard’s Café in Spartanburg generously purchased most of the leftover bowls. Cups or bowls of Gerhard’s soups are available to be served in one of the “Empty Bowls” (just ask your server), and if a patron wants to keep the serving bowl, he or she need only pay an additional $2 charge. Gerhard’s will donate the money from bowl sales to TOTAL Ministries.

Soup Day 2015 is already scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 26 at Chapman Cultural Center. Bowl-making events will start in the summer.

For further info call 864/278-9698 or e-mail to (sWong@SpartanArts.org).

Hub City Empty Bowls Sets Schedule to Help Feed the Hungry in Spartanburg, SC

May 29, 2014

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Hub City Empty Bowls 2014 is set to start making pottery bowls and money to feed needy Spartanburg, SC, citizens. There will be five bowl-making days that will lead up to Soup Day, Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014 at Chapman Cultural Center.

For the past five years, Hub City Empty Bowls has raised tens of thousands of dollars to feed local citizens by having the general public make clay bowls that were used on Soup Day. On Soup Day, the hundreds of colorful and handmade bowls are set out on display for the public’s choosing. For a $15 donation per bowl, the patron may enjoy unlimited gourmet soup donated by local restaurants at the community event that also features live music, a silent auction, and the fellowship of helping others. All of the money raised goes to an established charity that feeds local and needy citizens.

Last year, Empty Bowls raised a record amount of more than $20,000 and netted $18,600 that was given to TOTAL Ministries for its food pantry. The beneficiary of the funds raised this year will once again be TOTAL Ministries, a local non-profit charity that provides assistance for basic needs to Spartanburg County families who are facing financial crisis.

This year, all of the public bowl-making events will be held at either Spartanburg Art Museum School, located at Chapman Cultural Center, or West Main Artists Co-op in Spartanburg. At these events, the public is invited to make handmade pottery bowls. No experience is necessary, and all materials, including instruction by Carolina Clay Artists, are free. The bowls are left to be glazed and fired, and eventually used on Soup Day. Organizers hope to have 1,400 bowls made this year. Here is the bowl-making schedule:

• June 14, Spartanburg Art Museum School, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-3 p.m.
• June 19, West Main Co-op, 6-8:30 p.m. (ArtWalk)
• July 19, Spartanburg Art Museum School, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-3 p.m.
• Aug. 16, Spartanburg Art Museum School, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-3 p.m.
• Aug. 21, West Main Co-op, 6-8:30 p.m. (ArtWalk)

This year’s sponsoring partners are Carolina Clay Artists, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg Art Museum, West Main Artists Co-op, and Chris Williams of Clay-King.com.

Empty Bowls is an international grassroots effort to fight hunger, started in 1990 as a student art project in Michigan. The basic premise is simple: Potters and other craftspeople, educators and others work with the community to create handcrafted bowls. Guests are invited to a simple meal of soup and bread. In exchange for a cash donation, guests are asked to keep a bowl as a reminder of all the empty bowls in the world. The money raised is donated to an organization working to end hunger and food insecurity. Events have now taken place across the United States and in at least a dozen other countries. Many millions of dollars have been raised and donated to hunger-fighting organizations.

The Carolina Clay Artists are seeking sponsors and donations for Hub City Empty Bowls. Funds are needed for expenses. Donations are tax deductible. Anyone wishing to contribute should make checks payable to Spartanburg County Foundation with an indication that the gift is for the Hub City Empty Bowls Project Fund; mail checks to 424 E. Kennedy St, Spartanburg, SC 29302.

For sponsorship opportunities or to learn more about Hub City Empty Bowls 2014, please contact Nancy Williamson by calling 864/621-2768 or e-mail to (NanWilliamson@gMail.com).

Hub City Empty Bowls’ Soup Day Takes Place Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC

November 6, 2013

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After five months of coordinating the making of more than 1,400 handmade pottery bowls – made mostly by the untrained yet very enthusiastic general public – Hub City Empty Bowls is ready to serve soup and raise money on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, 11am to 7:30pm.

“Soup Day is upon us, and I think we are ready,” Nancy Williamson, the project’s co-coordinator, said. “We have the bowls, we have the soup, we have the music, and we have the need. Now all we need is for the people to come out on Saturday, Nov. 9, to Chapman Cultural Center and enjoy the experience of eating gourmet soup, fellowship, and the moral reward of knowing that for $15 many of the needy, poor and hungry citizens of our community will have their next meal.”

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All of the money raised at this annual event will go to TOTAL Ministries, a local charity that provides food to the community’s most impoverished citizens. Last year, Empty Bowls raised more than $12,000 for the Spartanburg Soup Kitchen.

Empty Bowls is a national social phenomenon where the potters in individual communities spearhead an effort to raise money for a local charity whose mission is to feed the hungry. With no oversight and little overhead, Carolina Clay Artists, an organization of local potters, organizes the event and coordinates several bowl-making sessions for the general public. Most of the bowls were made at the Spartanburg Art Museum School at Chapman Cultural Center and at West Main Artists Co-op, shaped by hand, rather than thrown on a wheel. The potters instruct the citizens on how to make the bowls, and the clay is provided at no charge. During the months of preparation, the bowls are painted and glazed.

1113empty-bowls-Soup-being-served

In addition, professional potters, Carolina Clay Artists members, and Spartanburg Art Museum students and teachers have donated soup bowls for the event. Spartanburg School District 7 has donated bowls that were made from start to finished bowls by their teachers, Spartanburg High pottery students, and Jessie Boyd’s Art Club. Interspersed in the offering of very basic bowls the public can find some treasures. “There’s the feeling of a treasure hunt to the event,” Williamson said. “People look for special bowls, some made by professionals and some made by little children.”

On Soup Day, all of the colorful and various size bowls are brought out. For a $15 donation, a citizen can pick out his or her favorite bowl and have it filled with the soup of his choice. This year, there are about 20 restaurants providing soup. In addition, bread and iced tea will be provided. There will be an ongoing silent auction in the midst of the bowls and soup. “Soup Day is the most amazing experience,” Williamson said. “It is always one of those feel-good experiences. You have such a grassroots atmosphere of handmade bowls, top-quality soup, live music, and the fellowship of kindred souls all coming together to make Spartanburg a better place to live.”

“I’ve bought several bowls over the years,” supporter Steve Wong said. “Soup Day is great fun, but for me the best part is getting to keep the bowl. It never fails that when I go to my kitchen cabinet for a bowl, I always choose one from Empty Bowls. It just means something special. It’s a reminder of how lucky I am to have food to put in my bowl.”

In addition to the bowls, soup, and live music, a new element is being introduced to the Hub City Empty Bowl experience: drum circles. There will be two drum circles: one starts at 11am; the other starts at 5pm. Both will happen outdoors in the Chapman Cultural Center plaza. The public is invited to join the communal drum circles by bringing whatever percussion instrument available and adding sound to the rhythms that will be lead by experienced drum circle enthusiasts.

“We think having drum circles will be a great new thing for Soup Day,” Williamson said. “It seems like a natural pairing, both being so basic and in touch with nature. I kind of think of the drums as calling people to come join in.”

It is by the very nature of the Empty Bowls phenomenon that the bowl making, Soup Day, and fundraising are accomplished by many people working together for a common cause. “So much credit must be given to Carolina Clay Artists,” Williamson said. “They are the heart and soul of this project and Empty Bowls in Spartanburg would not happen without them. They secure the clay, the locations, the instruction: They basically do all of the heavy lifting and spend their weekends glazing, painting, washing and just doing whatever needs to be done. Others who need to be recognized are Spartanburg Art Museum’s Art School, Chapman Cultural Center, West Main Artist Co-op, and donors Chris Williams of Clay-King and Steve and Joanne Metcalf.”

Live music by…

• 11am – The Lovely Jodie
• noon – Fayssoux
• 1pm – Rich Nelson and the acoustic trio “176”
• 2pm – Anna V
• 3pm – The Windjammers
• 4pm – Frank Walker
• 5pm – Mark Miller
• 6pm – Matthew Knights

Soup & Other Food Provided by…

Soup…
Backporch, Basil’s Grille, Billy D’s, Blue Moon Catering, Chef Bill McClellan, SCC, Cribb’s Kitchen, Cuzina’s, Farmer’s Table, Garner’s, Gerhards, Holden’s Ranch, Ice Cream/Coffee Beans, LaTravena, Lime Leaf, Mon Amie, Movable Feasts & Spartanburg ARP Youth, Palmetto Palate, Terrace at Spartanburg Marriott, and Wild Aces.

Beverages and Bread…
Beacon Drive-In, Cakehead Bakery, Little River Roasting, Dutch Plate, Jimmy John’s, Longhorn, and Wade’s Southern Cooking.

For more information, please call Nancy Williamson at 864/621-2768.

Hub City Empty Bowls Returns to Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC – Nov. 10, 2012 – Help Make Bowls Now

August 17, 2012

For the next three months, community-minded citizens will make soup bowls as part of Spartanburg, SC’s fourth annual Hub City Empty Bowls project that will raise and donate money to the Spartanburg Soup Kitchen.

At various scheduled bowl-making events, the public will be invited to make clay bowls at either the Chapman Cultural Center or the West Main Artists Co-op in Spartanburg. The bowl-making events are free and professional instruction from members of the Carolina Clay Artists group is provided. The bowls will be made in preparation of Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, when they will be used to serve soup to the general public at the Chapman Cultural Center. The soup will be donated by various restaurants in the region, and patrons will be asked to donate $15 for a handmade pottery bowl. The bowls will be kept by the patrons as souvenir reminders of the constant need to help hungry citizens in Spartanburg. A silent auction for larger serving-type bowls is being considered. All of the money raised through this project will be donated to the Spartanburg Soup Kitchen.

In addition to soup being served, the daylong event—11am -7:30pm – will feature live music, drinks, and plenty of community fellowship.

Empty Bowls is a national grass-roots program that started in 1990 in Michigan. Throughout the county, hundreds of communities have since held their own Empty Bowls projects that simply ask people to make bowls, restaurants to donate soup, and the public to enjoy the soup and keep the bowls for a modest donation. This year’s event coordinator is Jim Cullen, a pottery instructor at the Spartanburg Art Museum Art School from Campobello, SC, who first brought the concept to Spartanburg four years ago.

The major sponsors for the Hub City Empty Bowls 2012 are the Carolina Clay Artists (providing professional instruction and assistance), Chapman Cultural Center (providing location), the Spartanburg Art Museum (providing studio space and kilns), West Main Artists Co-op (providing studio space and kilns), and Clay-King.com (providing clay).

Here is a schedule of bowl-making events for the next few weeks…

• Saturday, Aug. 18, 10am-noon and 1-3pm, Chapman Cultural Center.
• Saturday, Aug. 25, 10am-noon and 1-3pm, Chapman Cultural Center.
• Thursday, Sept. 20, 6:30-8:30pm, West Main Artists Co-op.

More bowl-making events to be announced.

To be involved in this community event, please visit online (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com) or (www.FaceBook.com/HubCityEmptyBowls2012).

For more information, please contact Cullen by e-mail at (jcullensc@gmail.com) or call at 864/320-5358.