Posts Tagged ‘Chapman Cultural Center’

Hub City Empty Bowls in Spartanburg, SC, Launches 2017 Program

May 31, 2017

Hub City Empty Bowls – an annual fundraiser that uses handmade pottery bowls to feed hungry Spartanburg citizens – has set the 2017 dates for its well-attended events. There will be three regularly scheduled bowl-making events: Saturday, July 15, 2017, at 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s pottery studio at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC; Thursday, July 20, 2017, from 5-8pm at West Main Artists Co-Op, during ArtWalk; and Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017, at 10am-noon and 1-3pm at Chapman Cultural Center. Soup Day will be Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017, from 11am-4pm at Chapman Cultural Center. All events are free and family friendly.

Hub City Empty Bowls is a localized fundraiser inspired the international Empty Bowls decentralized program. Locally, the program’s spearhead Carolina Clay Artists coordinates public bowl-making sessions. At no charge, citizens of all ages are given supplies, tools, space, and instructions on how to make hand-shaped pottery bowls. Those unfinished bowls are left at the venue to be painted and fired by experienced potters. Bowls often made by children can be simple, primitive, and charming. Others made by experienced potters can be precise, intricate, and sophisticated.

With hundreds of bowls created by local citizens, Carolina Clay Artists then hosts Soup Day, an event where patrons receive the bowls – each for a $15 donation to TOTAL Ministries, a local charity that provides food and other resources to people in financial crisis. In addition to receiving bowls, the patrons can enjoy a meal of soup, bread, and tea donated by the community’s leading restaurants, hear live music, bid in a silent auction, and enjoy the fellowship and comradery of knowing they are helping to feed people in need. In 2016, the Carolina Clay Artists donated a record-breaking $33,000 to TOTAL Ministries.

“Coordinating Hub City Empty Bowls is a massive undertaking,” 2017 Chairman Bruce Bowyer said. “People want to know as soon as possible about our dates so they can plan accordingly. Some people come to all of the bowl-making sessions and Soup Day. Plus, by setting the dates early, we can better handle the large crowds of people who normally show up. It is not unusual for us to have several hundred people come to a bowl-making session. And come Soup Day, we’ll see more than a thousand.”

Despite the crowds, it is seldom anyone has to wait to make a bowl or enjoy Soup Day. Space, volunteers, and experience are plentiful enough to keep everyone engaged.

Carolina Clay Artists is a local group of hobbyist and professional potters who come together monthly to share ideas, hold workshops and demos, and tour pottery studios to see other artists’ work and learn new ideas. It is open to all who have an interest in learning and sharing about pottery. Annual dues are $35. Hub City Empty Bowls is the group’s annual charity fundraising event to help feed the hungry.

TOTAL Ministries got its start in 1982 as Project Eat. Founder Dannie Horne saw an unemployment rate of 9.7% and that many people in Spartanburg County were hungry. During the first 17 months of Project Eat’s existence, $190,000 of groceries were distributed in an effort to alleviate that problem. In 1983, TOTAL Ministries of Spartanburg County, Inc. was incorporated by 12 Spartanburg churches to carry on the work of Project Eat. Since then, additional emergency services have been added to the TOTAL mission in an effort to help those in need. For those in need, TOTAL can help with utility services, food, and medications.

Empty Bowls started in 1990 by Michigan art teacher John Hartom, who organized a charitable event to give his art students a way to make a personal difference in the lives of others in their community. Hartom’s students made pottery bowls in their high school art classes, and the finished products were then used as individual serving pieces for a fundraising meal of soup and bread. From that simple beginning, Empty Bowls has spread around the world, taking root in communities both small and large. Spartanburg had its first Empty Bowls program in 2009. All Empty Bowls efforts are locally based with all proceeds going to a local charity with a mission to alleviate hunger in its community. None of the money raised leaves the community. The lead agency, Carolina Clay Artists, donates all of its time and talents, and receives no monetary benefit. Locally, all proceeds go to TOTAL Ministries.

For more information about Hub City Empty Bowls, please visit online at (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com) or call 864.706-3739 or 864/585-9167.

Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, Celebrates the Opening of Northside Artlets

March 30, 2017

On Apr. 11, 2017 from 5-7pm the Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, along with their partners and the Northside community will celebrate the opening of four Northside Artlets. The celebration will take place on the corner of Brawley and Farley Streets at two of the Artlet locations.

An opening ceremony will begin at 5:15pm with lots of activities and performances to follow. Join us for hands-on arts and crafts like painting, carving, planting and more. Live music and spoken word poetry along with refreshments will be enjoyed by all.

The Northside Artlets are outlets for art, and serve as public spaces for the creation of art. Designed and built to nurture social, cultural, and physical connections to place, embedding art in daily ritual to evoke community memory, tradition, and meaning. Conceived by the Northside Voyagers during the 2014 master planning process led by Art-Force, the Artlets were designed by Spartanburg Artist, Eli Blasko. The Northside Artlets were built by Blasko, four Apprentices receiving NCCER Certification through Spartanburg Community College, and Northside residents. The Northside Artlets provided workforce training, skills, and jobs for apprentices, renewed focus and access for cultural exchange in the Northside neighborhood, and provided direct collaboration with a professional artist.

Jennifer Evins, President and CEO hopes that “by providing a unique place with free daily access to the residents and visitors of the Northside, these Artlets will help to increase the vibrancy of the neighborhood and attract new residents and businesses to this developing community. The arts are known to make neighborhoods livable and express the unique culture of residents.” Northside has a long history of excellence in the visual and performing arts and is home to Spartanburg’s music legend Pink Anderson, Visual Artist and Educator Winston Wingo and many others.

The Artlets were made possible by a design grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support the design, fabrication, and installation. The result is a resident-inspired cultural destination capturing and extending the history and unique identity of the Northside.

While the project is being led by Chapman Cultural Center, critical partners include Artlet Artist Eli Blasko, Project Director Janet Kagan with Art-Force, the Northside Neighborhood Association as well as contributions from:

Northside Development Group
The Northside Voyagers
Spartanburg Community College Corporate + Community Education
Spartanburg Housing Authority Youth Build Program
Leadership Spartanburg Alumni Association Led by Crystal Pace
Stephen M Poole Builders Inc
Northside Neighborhood Association
Eagle Metals Manufacturing
Duke Energy
Milliken
Creative Development LLC
Anonymous Donor
Dellfrio
Inman Mills
Bob Burnett’s Inc
Jethro Waters
Constance Jones
Contributions of time generously donated by residents

Chapman Cultural Center provides cultural leadership for Greater Spartanburg by developing, strengthening, and promoting the scope, excellence and educational role of the arts, humanities and sciences, and to further their significance in the life of our community and all of its citizens.

The Chapman Cultural Center is located in on East Saint John St in downtown Spartanburg, SC. Please visit (www.ChapmanCulturalCenter.org) for more information.

The Johnson Collection in Spartanburg, SC, Offers Lecture by Metropolitan Museum Curator, Sylvia Yount – Mar. 15, 2017

March 7, 2017

Before ascending to one of the most coveted curatorial jobs in New York, Sylvia Yount spent years working in the South, where she developed a deep appreciation for the region’s culture. As the keynote speaker for the fourth annual installment of Voices in American Art, Dr. Yount, who now serves as the first female curator of the Metropolitan Museum’s iconic American Wing, will deliver a lecture that connects her Southern experiences and her achievements as a pioneering female professional with a recurring theme in her scholarship: art created by women.

Her presentation, “A Region of Their Own: Southern Women Artists,” is the centerpiece of the popular yearly symposium sponsored by the Johnson Collection. Open to the public at no charge, the event will take place at Chapman Cultural Center on Mar. 15, 2017, at 7pm. No reservations or tickets are required.

Sylvia Yount became the Lawrence A. Fleischman Curator in Charge of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in September 2014. She is responsible for the administrative oversight of the Wing, with its ten curators and twenty-five other staff and volunteers. She also provides vision and leadership, while defining collecting, interpretation, and audience-engagement goals for the historic department of fine and decorative arts from the colonial period to the early-twentieth century. Before moving to the Met, she spent seven years as Chief Curator and the Louise B. and J. Harwood Cochrane Curator of American Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and six as the Margaret and Terry Stent Curator of American Art and department head at the High Museum of Art. She began her curatorial career at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, America’s oldest art school and museum, in 1993.

In addition to completing pivotal collection reinstallations at her former institutions, Yount has organized major exhibitions (with accompanying catalogues) on Cecilia Beaux, Maxfield Parrish, and American modernism, among other topics. She received a Ph.D. and a M.A. in the History of Art from the University of Pennsylvania, and a B.A. in Italian from New York University. Yount has lectured and published widely on late nineteenth and twentieth century American art and culture as well as on issues of curatorial responsibility and current museum practice.

Created in support of the Johnson Collection’s mission to increase understanding of the dynamic role that art of the South plays in the larger context of our national history, Voices in American Art brings arts professionals from across the country to Spartanburg for annual symposiums that engage the cultural and college communities. Previous VIAA speakers include Jane Panetta, Associate Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art; Jan Postma, Chief Financial Officer of the Museum of Modern Art; Elizabeth Pochoda, former editor of “The Magazine Antiques”; and Sarah Cash, Associate Curator of American and British paintings at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Hailed by “The Magazine Antiques” with staging a “quiet art historical revolution” and expanding “the meaning of regional,” the Johnson Collection offers an extensive survey of artistic activity in the American South from the late eighteenth century to the present day. In May 2016, the Spartanburg-based collection received the Governor’s Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award for the Arts, South Carolina’s highest honor in the field.

For more information, please visit (www.thejohnsoncollection.org).

Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, Announces Date for Spartanburg Soaring! 2017 – Apr. 22, 2017

February 28, 2017

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The Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, has set the date for its fourth annual Spartanburg Soaring! International Kite Festival for Saturday, April 22, 2017, from 11am-5pm. This free and family-friendly festival has quickly become a much-anticipated event for people of all ages from all over the world. Hundreds of kites fill the sky above Barnet Park in downtown Spartanburg, complemented by live music, food, and children’s activities. During the course of the day, individuals and kite club members float kites of every imaginable shape and size to the sky, from small kites to whale-size kites made from the latest technology and advanced materials. It is a colorful and creative experience.

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The Spartanburg community has embraced the kite as a symbol of its creative, progressive, and playful spirit. Last year, the event attracted more than 3,000 participants from as far away as Europe.

“Every year we grow the Festival in terms of creativity and attendance,” Jennifer Evins, President and CEO of Chapman Cultural Center, said. “It is part of our mission to increase community vibrancy and civic engagement. It is a beautiful showcase of what it means to live in Spartanburg. It is a symbol of our progressive mindset, our creativity, our curiosity, and our playful nature.”

Chapman Cultural Center is now accepting the participation of kite clubs, food vendors, artists, and musicians.

For more information about this event, please call 864/542-ARTS or visit our Facebook Event Page at (https://www.facebook.com/ChapmanCulturalCenter).

Hub City Empty Bowls Soup Day Slated for Oct. 15, 2016, in Spartanburg, SC

September 30, 2016

Hub City Empty Bowls’s annual Soup Day – a grassroots fundraiser to help feed local hungry people – will be Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016, from 11am-4pm at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC. The public is invited to select handmade pottery bowls and enjoy a wide selection of gourmet soups in exchange for $15 donations. All proceeds go towards feeding the hungry at TOTAL Ministries, a local non-profit, faith-based agency that helps citizens who are facing financial crisis.

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Last year, Hub City Empty Bowls donated $26,000 to TOTAL Ministries. Carolina Clay Artists has spearheaded Hub City Empty Bowls since its inception in 2009. Since then, this group of potters has raised tens of thousands of dollars to help feed people in Spartanburg County.

For the past several months at Spartanburg Art Museum’s pottery studio and West Main Artists Co-Op, the general public has been making clay pottery bowls in preparation for Soup Day. Average citizens, as well as trained potters, have made hundreds of bowls at free bowl-making events. Those bowls have been glazed and fired by volunteers and will be displayed in Spartanburg Art Museum at Chapman on Soup Day. The display of hundreds of colorful bowls is an impressive sight. Patrons can select the bowls of their liking in an exchange for $15 donations. Afterward, the patrons may enjoy a simple meal of soup, bread, and tea while enjoying live music and fellowship.

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“As much fun is generated during Soup Day, we always want to keep in mind the real reason why we do this,” Bruce Bowyer, Chairman of the event said.

“Latest statistics say that about 15 percent of the people in Spartanburg are what professionals call ‘food insecure.’ Food Insecurity causes 43,000 Spartanburg County residents to struggle with putting food on the table or keeping a roof over a families head. TOTAL Ministries can help relieve the stress of these families by making sure they can put food on the table. The Carolina Clay Artists and all of the many people who help with Empty Bowls do it because we want to make sure everyone has enough food to eat. It really is just that simple.”

“The need in Spartanburg is dire,” Traci Kennedy, Executive Director of TOTAL Ministries, said. “If it weren’t for Hub City Empty Bowls, I don’t know what we do. Carolina Clay Artists is a Godsend. We literally have people lined up outside our door needing food. Our resources are limited, and I hate to admit that we cannot meet the entire need of the community. But thanks to Empty Bowls a lot more people are able to get much needed food. If you’ve never been in the situation of not knowing how you will feed your children, you’ll never fully understand how important Empty Bowls is.”

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TOTAL Ministries has become an official organizing partner with Carolina Clay Artists in the annual Hub City Empty Bowls project and the recipient of the proceeds. In past years, the proceeds were donated to various hunger-related agencies.

The soup – donated by local restaurants – will be served in Chapman’s theater lobby, where the music will also be performed. More than two dozen restaurants or food providers have been recruited to donate at least five gallons of soup. Those restaurants are Andre Nguyen, Basil’s Grille, Country Club of Spartanburg, Cribb’s Catering, Cribb’s Kitchen On Main, FATZ Café, Garner’s Cafe, Gerhards Cafe, Hub City Co-Op, Lime Leaf, Lowes, McClellan’s Urban Eatery, Mon Amie Morning Cafe, Moveable Feasts, Nu-Way Restaurant & Lounge, Palmetto Palate, Renato In Centro, Skillet Restaurant, Southern BBQ, Sparks, Sun King Chinese Restaurant, II Samuels Restaurant, Wild Ace’s, and Willy Taco. Donors of bread, tea, and supplies include The Beacon Drive In, Cakehead Bakery, Little River Roasting Co., Long Horn’s, Wade’s Southern Cooking, and Chick-fil-a.

During Soup Day, there will also a silent auction and live music. Collectors take note: the silent auction will feature finely crafted ceramics created by local and regional artists. The musicians donating their talents are Daniel Z, Fayssoux & Brandon, Rick Praytor, Frank Walker, and Mark Miller & Friends. Public drum circles, led by Melisa Emkjer, will be held in the plaza noon-1pm and 2-3pm.

“We are getting down to the wire on this year’s Hub City Empty Bowls’s project,” Bowyer said. “We’ve got the bowls, we’ve got the soup, now we need the people to come and get them.”

The event’s sponsors are Carolina Clay Artists, Spartanburg Art Museum, West Main Artists Co-op, Chapman Cultural Center, Chris Williams, Action Printing, The Healing Arts Fund at Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Milliken, Fairway Outdoor, The Arts Partnership of Greater Spartanburg, and Wheresville Productions. This program is supported in part by The Arts Partnership of Greater Spartanburg, its donors, the County and City of Spartanburg, and the South Carolina Arts Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina. Proceeds from this event will be directed to the Hub City Empty Bowls Project Fund, a component fund of The Spartanburg County Foundation established to increase awareness about the issues of hunger and food security, and to raise funds to help local organizations fight hunger. This year’s beneficiary organization is TOTAL Ministries.

For more information about Bowls Soup Day, please visit (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com) or call 864/706-3739.

Hub City Empty Bowls 2016 Aims to Feed Local Hungry Citizens in Spartanburg, SC

July 12, 2016

Hub City Empty Bowls anticipates another great art-based campaign in 2016 to feed the hungry people in Spartanburg County, SC, and invites everyone to make hand-crafted pottery bowls at free public events this summer. The finished bowls will be used for the annual Soup Day fundraiser in the autumn. This year, there will be three bowl-making opportunities for public participation: Saturday, July 16, 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s studios at Chapman Cultural Center; Thursday, July 21, 6-8:30pm at West Main Artists Co-Op; and Saturday, Aug. 27, 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s studios at Chapman Cultural Center. The Soup Day fundraiser will be Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016, 11am-4pm at Chapman Cultural Center.  The food pantry at TOTAL Ministries will receive the proceeds from the fundraiser to help feed the needy in Spartanburg County.

According to a 2016 report by County Health Rankings & Roadmaps by University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, 15 percent of Spartanburg’s population – that’s 42,980 people – is “food insecure.” In Greenville County, the percentage is 14. The lowest ranking county in the state is Lexington with 12 percent, and the highest ranking county is Allendale with 28 percent. Overall, 17 percent of the people in South Carolina “lack adequate access to food.”

“We might not be the worst county in South Carolina with a hunger problem,” Traci Kennedy, Director of TOTAL Ministries, said. “But 42,980 is a lot of people – our friends and neighbors – who don’t have enough to eat. For children it is even worse. 22.5 percent of the children in Spartanburg – almost one out of every four – is going hungry. It is TOTAL Ministries’ mission to help feed the hungry, and thanks to Hub City Empty Bowls, we are making headway. I just pray we have another good turnout of people to make the bowls and then have them and their friends come back on Soup Day to make donations, take the bowls home, eat some truly wonderful soup, and take comfort in knowing they have helped someone in need.” TOTAL Ministries has an annual budget of about $300,000, normally helps more than 4,500 households each year.

But first, you need to make pottery bowls. Bowl-making events provide a unique opportunity for members of the community to experience the pleasure of working with clay at no cost and at any level of experience, including no experience. The clay, facilities, and instruction are all donated.  Members of Carolina Clay Artists and volunteers will be on hand to instruct participants in the techniques of bowl-making.  Many of the bowls will be simple and primitive, which has a beauty all of its own. Some participants are experienced potters, who make their bowls on pottery wheels, often producing professional-grade bowls. The events are open to anyone willing to give of their time and effort, and make for wholesome and free family activities. The bowls are left at the studios and are later glazed and fired by experienced volunteers.

“People look forward to our bowl-making events every year,” Nancy Williamson, publicity leader on behalf of Carolina Clay Artists, said. “I see some of the same faces and families come back each year. It’s fun, easy, creative, free, and, of course, it is for a good cause. I am truly amazed at some of the raw talent I is see. Even more amazing is to see all the finished bowls laid out on Soup Day for the public to take home. It’s almost like an art exhibit – a huge art exhibit with every color of the rainbow and shape imaginable.”

Proceeds from last year’s campaign allowed Hub City Empty Bowls to make an all-time high donation of $26,000 to TOTAL Ministries, a faith-based organization with a primary mission of helping the financially disadvantaged citizens of the community. Most of the money was raised on Soup Day, when citizens would receive the handmade bowls by donating $15. As part of the festive occasion, local restaurants donated gourmet soup that the donors could enjoy, along with live music and fellowship. 2016 marks the eighth year that Carolina Clay Artists has spearheaded the local effort of the internationally successful Empty Bowls concept of feeding the needy through the creation of pottery bowls.

On Soup Day, the hundreds of finished and colorful bowls will be displayed in Spartanburg Art Museum at Chapman Cultural Center. For every $15 donation, the donor gets to keep a bowl of his or her choice and enjoy a simple meal of soup, bread, and tea, served in Chapman’s theater lobby. Along the perimeter of the lobby will be various serving stations set up by local restaurants that donate a wide selection of soups to the occasion. Patrons can enjoy soups from some of the best restaurants in Spartanburg, while dining under a large canopy set up in the outdoor plaza, and enjoy listening to live music and sharing in the fellowship of knowing they are helping feed citizens in the local community. A silent auction of donated items also takes place as another means of raising money. The tradition of having a drum circle in the lobby or plaza will continue this year.

Empty Bowls was started by a high school teacher in Michigan in 1990 as a high school student project to help feed the needy and has grown into an international phenomenon.  There are hundreds of Empty Bowls projects around the world, raising millions of dollars to feed the hungry. Each Empty Bowls organization is independent and self-governed.

Thus far, this year’s sponsors are Spartanburg Regional Foundation Healing Arts Fund, Carolina Clay Artists, West Main Artists Co-Op, Action Printing, Milliken & Company, Wheresville Productions, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg Art Museum, and Chris Williams. The project is still seeking more sponsors: companies and individuals willing to donate funds; restaurants to donate soup, bread, and tea; other businesses to donate eating utensils, such as paper cups, plastic spoon, and napkins; individuals and businesses to donate silent auction items; and potters to make the bowls.  Those willing to donate should contact Traci Kennedy by e-mail at (Director@TotalMinistries.org) or call 864/585-9167. For more information about TOTAL Ministries please visit (www.TotalMinistries.org).

Hub City Empty Bowls is a component fund of the Spartanburg County Foundation. It was established to increase awareness about the issues of hunger and food insecurity, and to help local organizations fight hunger.  For more information, please visit online at (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com). For the latest information on Hub City Empty Bowls, please like the organization on Facebook.

Mayo Mac Boggs Sculpture on Display at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC

May 30, 2016

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Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, has received the modern stainless steel sculpture — “Chariot” — made by the late Mayo Mac Boggs, one of Spartanburg and South Carolina’s most noted artists. It is now proudly displayed on Chapman’s campus, thanks to the artist’s widow Ansley Boggs, Ed.D., an education professor at Converse College.

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Created in 2005, the piece was first named “Constellation” by Boggs. However, in 2010, during Boggs’ “40th year Retrospective Exhibition” on the college campuses of Converse, Wofford, and USC-Upstate, he redubbed it “Chariot”. In recent years, the piece has been showcased at USC-Upstate’s library. Boggs passed away in March 2014.

Boggs had a long and celebrated career in the arts, after humble beginnings as the son of a welder in a Kentucky industrial city. In addition to his more than 40 years of teaching art at Converse College, he kept an active and productive career in creating art. Some of his noted achievements include receiving a 2013 Verner Award, the highest art award given in South Carolina; being named “Professor Emeritus of Art” by Converse College in 2013; and being named “Honorary Artist of Spartanburg” in 1991. Boggs’ art is placed in the Presidential Libraries of Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter. His work is located also internationally in permanent collections of numerous corporations. In addition, he has received many sculpture commissions for city parks, public libraries, college campuses, schools, local businesses, and private residences, one of which was for the home of author Lillian Jackson Braun.

In regards to his inspiration and preferred medium, Boggs once said, “The welded steel sculpture has remained a constant as my medium of expression. I love the look, feel, taste, smell and sound of steel. My great-grandfather was a blacksmith in Kentucky; both my grandfathers and my father were welders and steelworkers. I grew up watching steel pouring from the blast furnaces and the nightly spectacular display of slag being dumped from huge, railroad-sized crucibles. I walked the railroad tracks and picked up scrap metal that had fallen from freight cars. The ironworker’s material and process were an everyday part of my childhood in Ashland, KY. I have taken this material and its process and made art, continuing a family tradition of ironwork.”

In his artist statement, dated March 2011, he wrote: “There are many things one can do to occupy his time while on this earth. I prefer to have non-verbal conversations with my soul. My art is the residue.”

“Chariot” can be viewed daily at Chapman Cultural Center.

For further info contact Steve Wong, Marketing Director, Chapman Cultural Center by calling 864/278-9698 or e-mail to (sWong@SpartanArts.org).

Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, Receives Hayes Sculpture for Public Display

May 21, 2016

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For public display, Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, has received a painted-steel nonobjective sculpture by the noted artist David Hayes. The multisided sculpture is painted in bright primary colors and sits at the entrance of Chapman’s theater. It is on permanent loan from an anonymous patron.

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Hayes, 1931-2013, was an American sculptor noted for pioneering sculptures in metal and for his work’s graceful curves, shapes abstracted from sketches of objects and ideas. His earlier works were usually black, however, early in this century, he began adding bright and bold colors to his work, which became his iconic style. The unnamed piece at Chapman is a fine example of his later work.

Hayes’s work is sought after around the world and displayed in the most prestigious galleries, such as the Museum of Modern Art, Guggenheim Museum, and Smithsonian American Art Museum.

In reference to his work, Hayes once said: “Each sculpture begins with the ink and gouache drawings that I do each day. The forms and shapes, and their interaction, are delineated on paper, with the color showing each different form. The drawings themselves are derived from copious notebooks of sketches that I make to depict objects and shapes that I respond to in nature and the environment around me. Later they are painted with several coats of primer and weather resistant colors. The coloration of the pieces is determined by what I see in the shapes themselves. And though the pieces have individual titles, I leave the interpretation of each to the realm of the viewer’s imagination. The sculptures are out in the open and can be viewed under different weather and light conditions as they are all made for out of door exposure. I have a strong conviction about art in public areas where it can be seen and enjoyed in uninhibiting surroundings.”

The Hayes sculpture at Chapman can be viewed daily. For extensive information about Hayes, please visit his website at (www.DavidHayes.com).

Phifer-Johnson Foundation/The Johnson Collection Receives State’s Highest Art Award – Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award

May 12, 2016

The Phifer-Johnson Foundation/The Johnson Collection has been named the recipient of the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner 2016 Business/Foundation Award, by the South Carolina Arts Commission. The Johnson Foundation was nominated by Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC.

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The Johnsons with Gov. Haley

The Johnson Foundation received the award Wednesday, May 11, 2016, at a ceremony at the Statehouse in Columbia, SC. The Foundation received a handcrafted bronze statue, designed by Columbia-based artist Jean McWhorter.

The Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Awards recognize outstanding achievement and contributions to the arts in South Carolina, and are the highest honor the state gives in the arts. These awards honor South Carolina arts organizations, patrons, artists, members of the business community, and government entities who maximize their roles as innovators, supporters and advocates of the arts. In 1980, the Verner Awards took on a special significance with their designation as the official “Governor’s Awards for the Arts.”

“On behalf of Chapman Cultural Center’s artists and patrons, we are thrilled that the Johnsons have been recognized as leaders in the supports of the arts, not only in Spartanburg, but through out South Carolina, the South, and the nation,” Chapman President and CEO Jennifer Evins said. “Over the years, the Johnsons have supported the arts with their wisdom, influence, resources, and time. We can never thank them enough. Receiving this award speaks to the world-class appreciation of and commitment to the arts that the Johnsons have.”

When Susu and George Johnson’s personal art collection outgrew their home and office space, they decided to share it. What began as an interest in paintings by Carolina artists in 2002 has grown to encompass over 1,200 objects that chronicle the cultural evolution of the American South. Three scholarly books have been published around the Johnson Collection’s holdings. Each of the books is accompanied by a touring exhibition that travels to leading museums in South Carolina and across the South for two to four years. In contrast to most touring shows, the Johnsons share these exhibitions with all participating museums at no cost. These efforts to provide broad access to the arts for free have attracted national attention from such prominent publications as “American Art Review”, “The Magazine Antiques” and “Garden & Gun”. A website for the collection features images and notes on hundreds of Southern artists and a searchable catalog of the collection’s library of over 4,000 volumes. The collection’s curator serves as a visiting scholar and lecturer at local colleges, and students are invited to apply for curatorial internships. A gallery in downtown Spartanburg presents regular exhibitions from the collection and loans artwork to a variety of public and educational institutions, making the collection highly accessible to the public.

The Johnsons’ philanthropic commitment to community, arts and culture extends beyond the Johnson Collection to support local and statewide arts programs and initiatives. The Phifer-Johnson Foundation is a major benefactor of the South Carolina First Novel Prize, which is establishing a national profile for South Carolina’s most promising writers. They have been important to the success of Spartanburg’s Chapman Cultural Center, a centerpiece in Spartanburg’s active cultural scene. They are key supporters of arts organizations and activities that add vibrancy and attract youth and talent to their community, including the Hub-Bub Artist in Residence Program, Ballet Spartanburg, the Music Foundation of Spartanburg, Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Brookgreen Gardens, and more. Equally dedicated to arts advancement and arts accessibility, the Johnsons generously share their vision, energy, passion and resources to benefit the arts in South Carolina.

Elizabeth O’Neill Verner achieved an international reputation for her etchings and pastels, many of which capture the spirit of the South Carolina Lowcountry. She was also a teacher, writer and historian. Throughout her 96 years, Mrs. Verner traveled abroad extensively. Drawings of South Carolina residences, churches and street-life portraits are Verner trademarks recognized throughout the world for the way they capture South Carolina’s unique people and architecture. Mrs. Verner’s studio is located on Tradd Street in Charleston, SC.

Other 2016 Verner Awards include Charleston artist Mary Edna Fraser, Executive Director of the South Carolina Arts Alliance Betty Plumb, arts education agency Joye In Aiken, government agency The City of Greenville, and arts organization The Columbia Museum of Art. Special recognition was given to Hootie and the Blowfish, and writer/poet Nikky Finney.

For further info call Steve Wong, Marketing Director, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg, SC. at 864/278-9698 or e-mail to (sWong@SpartanArts.org).

Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, Seeks Woodworking Artist – Deadline is Feb. 12, 2016

January 16, 2016

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Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC, is looking for a professional South Carolina artist/craftsperson with experience in producing functional and large-scale wood sculptures. That person will lead a design team that will make four performance stages — Artlets — as part of Spartanburg’s redevelopment of its Northside neighborhood.

The lead artist will be paid $15,000, with additional funds for materials, civil and structural engineers, and other project expenses. Tools and workshop space will be made available. Volunteer college students and community residents will assist with construction and landscaping. As a collaborative endeavor, Chapman Cultural Center staff, community residents, the City of Spartanburg, and Northside Development Group will participate in this public art project. The project schedule is expected to run approximately 3-4 months for design, three months for fabrication, and one month for installation. The overall schedule is from January 2016 to January 2017. The artist will need to participate in one or two community meetings to explain the project designs and answer questions.

Chapman Cultural Center was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts (NEA ) Artworks Grant to design the prototype four Artlets as part of a larger neighborhood-wide redevelopment initiative to create a more livable neighborhood. This project is the next step in the cultural planning process funded by an Our Town Grant. The plan for the Northside Neighborhood of Spartanburg identified short-term and long-term goals for arts infusion in this underserved neighborhood with innovative approaches to how the arts may be experienced and appreciated.

The team will design and build four Artlets, measuring roughly 10’ x 10’ with movable/shifting walls at the perimeter edges that will provide a background for performers using the space as a stage, a private zone, a play area, or other impromptu activities. Each unique Artlet will sit on a concrete pad.

For additional information about the Northside redevelopment, please visit online at (SpartanburgNDG.com) and (ChapmanCulturalCenter.org) (search “northside”).

For more info on this Call for Artists, contact Melissa Earley at 864/278-9685. Please submit a letter of interest, a resume or CV, a summary of project oversight experience (or experience working with volunteers), and up to five JPGs of recent works, or include a link to an online gallery of your work, by Feb. 12, 2016, to (mEarley@SpartanArts.org).