Posts Tagged ‘Gibbes Museum of Art’

Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, Announces 2015/2016 Slate of Officers, New Board Members, and Philanthropy Award at Fellows Luncheon

June 17, 2015

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On Friday, May 19, 2015, the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, announced the new slate of officers and Board Members, and the winner of the 2015 philanthropy award at the museum’s Fellows Luncheon celebration. “This year we are thrilled to present Croghan’s Jewel Box with the 2015 James S. Gibbes Philanthropy Award. Croghan’s philanthropy and support of the Gibbes has spanned generations and is alive and strong today,” says Executive Director Angela Mack.

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James S. Gibbes Philanthropy Award – Each year the Board and staff of the CAA bestows on an individual or group the James S. Gibbes Philanthropy Award. Gibbes was deeply devoted to the betterment of Charleston’s young creative minds in the aftermath of Reconstruction. Through his 1885 bequest of $100K, which in today’s dollars is valued at $2.5M, Gibbes launched what we know today as the Gibbes Museum of Art.  His generosity and vision set the state for the visual arts in Charleston by providing the funds to build the oldest art museum in the South.

Croghan’s Jewel Box
William Joseph Croghan opened Croghan’s Jewel Box in 1919 on King Street. His daughter, Mary Croghan Ramsay, was owner and manager of the store and during this time was a tireless supporter of the Gibbes and a champion of the local arts community. Mary remained involved with the museum until her death in 2009. Her daughters, Mariana Hay and Rhett Outten have carried on this tradition of support. Rhett has been a faithful and hardworking board member since 2011 and was co-chair of the Street Party in 2013. She is a current member of the Cultivation Committee, and offers a boundless enthusiasm to her varied roles. Over the years Croghan’s has been a consistent donor to silent auctions, a sponsor of the Women’s Council’s annual Art of Design luncheon and the Gibbes Street Party, and has maintained a Fellows level membership.

Gibbes Museum of Art Board Slate

Chair, Laura Gates
Immediate Past President, Allan Anderson
Vice Chairs, Jill Almeida, Jane Beak, Daniel Gallagher, Dr. John Hallett, Eleanor Hale, Alice Wyatt, and Charles Wyrick

Class of 2018

Denise Barto
Sarah Donnem
Wendy Dopp
Milton Hearne
Deborah Kennedy
Mark Maresca
Gale Messerman
Harold Rhodes
Elizabeth Saal
Harriet Smartt
Lisa Weitz

Established as the Carolina Art Association in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art opened its doors to the public in 1905. In the fall of 2014, the Gibbes temporarily closed for major renovations and will reopen its doors in the spring of 2016. The renovation project is designed to showcase the museum’s collection, provide visitors with a history of American art from the early colonial era to the present, and engage the public with a center for education, artist studios, lecture and event space, a museum café, and store. During the renovation the museum will offer programs such as the Insider Art Series, Art With a Twist, Art of Healing, events including the Art of Design and annual Gibbes on the Street Party, and educational offerings such as Art to Go and Eye Spy Art. Highlights of the Gibbes permanent collection can be viewed on Google Art Project at (www.googleartproject.com).

Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, Presents Gibbes on the Street – May 7, 2015

March 12, 2015

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On Thursday, May 7, 2015, Meeting Street will be transformed into the glittering streets of Paris in the early 1900’s. Charleston’s top chefs will serve delicacies inspired by the French culinary tradition while guests enjoy live music, entertainment, and the opportunity to mingle under the stars. La Belle Époque is inspired by the “golden age” where the arts flourished and many masterpieces of literature, music, theater, and visual art gained recognition on a grand scale. Beaux Arts architecture, a theatrical and heavily ornamented classical style, originated in Paris during this time and the Gibbes Museum’s Beaux-Arts building, which is currently undergoing renovations, and will serve as the backdrop for this celebration under the stars.

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“This year’s event will highlight the connection between art created in the south and that of the European masters. The Gibbes beaux-arts building was created during this glorious time and after more than 100 years, the renovations will restore the museum to its original beauty. Gibbes on the Street provides us the opportunity to celebrate Charleston’s finest restaurants in the middle of the historic district, with the backdrop of a great institution in the making,” says Executive Director Angela Mack.

Each year Charleston Grill’s General Manager Mickey Bakst is instrumental in selecting and managing Charleston’s finest restaurants for the Street Party. “The Street Party is unconditionally the best party of the year! All restauranteurs love doing this event,” says Bakst.

Participating Restaurants include: Brasserie Gigi, Baguette Magic, Caviar & Bananas, Charleston Grill, Christophe Artisan Chocolatier-Patissier, Circa 1886, Cypress, Edmund’s Oast, FIG, Goat.Sheep.Cow, The Grocery, Halls Chophouse, McCrady’s, Oak Steakhouse, The Obstinate Daughter, 167 Raw, Rue De Jean, Saveurs Du Monde, Slightly North of Broad, WildFlour Pastry, and Wild Olive. Guests will enjoy a full bar with featured libations from Cîroc and Bulleit.

Sponsors include: Gibbes on the Street corporate sponsors include Bank of America, U. S. Trust, Carriage Properties, SCE&G, Lynch Cracraft, Croghans Jewel box, PDA, Event Designs by Denise Barto, and Charleston Magazine.

Tickets are $150 for museum members and $175 for non-members. Tickets can be purchased online at (www.gibbesmuseum.org/streetparty) or by calling 843/722-2706 x21. Tickets must be purchased in advance and all ticket holders must be at least 21 years of age. The event will be held rain or shine.

Established as the Carolina Art Association in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art opened its doors to the public in 1905. In the fall of 2014, the Gibbes temporarily closed for major renovations and will reopen its doors in the spring of 2016. The renovation project is designed to showcase the museum’s collection, provide visitors with a history of American art from the early colonial era to the present, and engage the public with a center for education, artist studios, lecture and event space, a museum café, and store. During the renovation the museum will offer programs such as the Insider Art Series, Art With a Twist, Art of Healing, events including the Art of Design and annual Gibbes on the Street Party, and educational offerings such as Art to Go and Eye Spy Art. Highlights of the Gibbes permanent collection can be viewed on Google Art Project at (www.googleartproject.com).

For further info visit (www.gibbesmuseum.org).

Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, is Accepting Online Entries for 2015 Mary Whyte Art Educator Award Through June 1, 2015

February 7, 2015

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The Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, is pleased to accept submissions for the annual Mary Whyte Art Educator Award. Established in 2007, this award is designed to highlight a high school visual art teacher in South Carolina school districts who has demonstrated superior commitment to their students and to their craft. The award is accompanied by a cash prize of $2,500 and is administered and presented annually by the Gibbes Museum of Art.

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“Since 2008, the Gibbes Museum of Art has been privileged to present the Mary Whyte Art Educator Award. With the award now statewide, it is an even bigger honor for the finalists and winner. Quality teachers deserve recognition and the Gibbes is making every effort to do this for our state,” says Rebecca Sailor, Gibbes Museum Curator of Education.

Entries for the annual award and $2,500 cash prize can be made exclusively online at (www.marywhyteaward.org) through June 1, 2015 Artists who have applied previously for the Mary Whyte award must update their online entry form in order to remain eligible for the 2015 award. The award is being offered to educators throughout the state. The review panel will select the finalists in June, and the Gibbes Museum of Art will announce the winner at the South Carolina Art Educators Association annual meeting in the fall.

Watercolor artist Mary Whyte is a teacher and author whose figurative paintings have earned national recognition. A resident of Johns Island, SC, Whyte garners much of her inspiration from the Gullah descendants of coastal Carolina slaves who number among her most prominent subjects. Her portraits are included in numerous corporate, private, and university collections, as well as in the permanent collections of the Gibbes Museum of Art and the Greenville County Museum of Art. Her paintings have been featured in International Artist, Artist, American Artist, Watercolor, and American Art Collector, L’Art de Aquarelle, and numerous other publications. Whyte is the author of numerous books and her work can be found at Coleman Fine Art in Charleston, where her husband, Smith Coleman, manages the gallery and makes gilded and carved frames.

Established as the Carolina Art Association in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art opened its doors to the public in 1905. In the fall of 2014, the Gibbes temporarily closed for major renovations and will reopen its doors in the spring of 2016. The renovation project is designed to showcase the museum’s collection, provide visitors with a history of American art from the early colonial era to the present, and engage the public with a center for education, artist studios, lecture and event space, a museum café, and store. During the renovation the museum will offer programs such as the Insider Art Series, Art with a Twist, Art of Healing, events including the Art of Design and annual Gibbes on the Street Party, and educational offerings such as Art to Go and Eye Spy Art. Highlights of the Gibbes permanent collection can be viewed on Google Art Project at (www.googleartproject.com).

For further info visit (www.gibbesmuseum.org).

Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, Calls for Applications for the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art

January 6, 2015

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The Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, is accepting applications for the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. Sponsored by our young patrons auxiliary group Society 1858, the prize will be awarded annually to acknowledge an artist whose work demonstrates the highest level of artistic achievement in any media, while contributing to a new understanding of art in the South.

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Unlike any other award of its type, the 1858 Prize is designed to create an online archive of information about Southern artists that can be used by curators, collectors, academicians, and the public. Past winners include photographers Jeff Whetstone and Stephen Marc, mixed-media artist Radcliffe Bailey, sculptor Patrick Dougherty, and mixed-media artist Sonya Clark.

Entries for the annual award and a $10,000 cash prize opened on Jan. 1, 2015, and can be made exclusively online at (1858prize.org) through May 29, 2015. Artists from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia are eligible to apply.

Supported by the museum’s auxiliary group, Society 1858, the prize is administered annually by the Gibbes Museum of Art.

For more information, please visit (1858prize.org).

Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, Receives $150,000 from The Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation

December 15, 2014

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The Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, has received a grant award in the amount of $150,000 from the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation to support the installation of the museum’s miniature portrait collection in the renovated building. The Donnelley Foundation supports efforts to preserve and provide greater access to regionally significant collections. The Foundation’s strategy is to support a range of specific projects including stabilization, cataloguing, preservation and restoration, digitization, enhanced opportunities for access by both the general public and scholars, and reinterpretation.

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American eye miniature, unknown, ca. 1830’s, watercolor on ivory; 1 inch diameter. Gift of Mr. James Sellers in memory of James Nelson Sellers

“We are thrilled to receive this grant from the Donnelley Foundation for the installation and preservation of the miniature collection. The first-ever American miniatures were painted in Charleston, and today the Gibbes is home to one of the most prestigious American portrait miniature collections in the country,” says Gibbes Museum of Art Executive Director, Angela Mack.

A major highlight of the newly renovated museum will be a dedicated gallery space featuring the nationally-acclaimed collection of portrait miniatures. With over 600 miniature portraits, the Gibbes collection is the third largest in the United States and ranks in quality among those of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Yale University Art Gallery, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. New state-of-the-art display cases featuring accessible open storage drawers will allow visitors to experience, up-close, nearly three hundred portrait miniatures by some of America’s most significant painters while simultaneously providing custom microclimates to preserve this sensitive collection.

“Prior to the renovation, gallery conditions at the museum allowed for the exhibition of just 30-35 miniatures at a time—a fraction of the total collection. The new, dedicated miniature portrait gallery will introduce visitors to the refined colors and exquisite draftsmanship of these tiny treasures,” says Sara Arnold Gibbes Museum of Art Curator of Collections. This unprecedented access to the collection will be accompanied by digitally enhanced interpretive materials that will offer visitors of all ages, in-depth insight into painting techniques, materials, jeweled casework, conservation, and the social and cultural significance of these unique objects.

Gaylord Donnelley was a former chairman of the R.R. Donnelley Company, a Chicago-based publishing company founded by his grandfather in 1864. Gaylord and his wife, Dorothy, were avid lovers of the outdoors. They contributed to numerous land conservation efforts in the Chicago region and their adopted home in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. They were equally devoted to the arts and preserving collections. The Donnelley’s legacy lives on in the Foundation they established in 1952. Today, the Foundation supports land conservation, artistic vitality and collections of regional significance in the Chicago region and the Lowcountry of South Carolina.

Established as the Carolina Art Association in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art opened its doors to the public in 1905. In the fall of 2014, the Gibbes temporarily closed for major renovations and will reopen its doors in the spring of 2016. The renovation project is designed to showcase the museum’s collection, provide visitors with a history of American art from the early colonial era to the present, and engage the public with a center for education, artist studios, lecture and event space, a museum café, and store. During the renovation the museum will offer programs such as the Insider Art Series, Art With a Twist, Art of Healing, events including the Art of Design and annual Gibbes on the Street Party, and educational offerings such as Art to Go and Eye Spy Art. Highlights of the Gibbes permanent collection can be viewed on Google Art Project at (www.googleartproject.com).

For further info call the Museum at 843/722-2706 or visit (www.gibbesmuseum.org).

Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, Announces 2014 Mary Whyte Art Educator Award

November 22, 2014

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The Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, is pleased to announce Donna Shank Major as this year’s recipient of the annual Mary Whyte Art Educator Award. Established in 2007, this award is designed to highlight a high school visual art teacher in South Carolina school districts who has demonstrated superior commitment to their students and to their craft. The award is accompanied by a cash prize of $2,500 and is administered and presented annually by the Gibbes Museum of Art. The winner was announced at the South Carolina Art Educators Association annual meeting in Greenville, SC, on Nov. 21, 2014. “Mary’s support of art educators in South Carolina is immeasurable. The Gibbes is honored to support the award. There are so many teachers worth recognizing and we hope they will continue to apply year after year,” says Curator of Education Rebecca Sailor.

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Donna Shank Major is the instructor for 2D and 3D Design courses, teaches in the ARMES program at the Fine Arts Center, in Greenville, and serves as the Coordinator for Explore the Arts summer program. The ARMES program is a tuition-free arts program designed to meet the needs of students in grades 4 through 8 who have demonstrated outstanding talents and a deep interest in theatre, visual arts, strings or dance. Major grew up in Greenville and was an art student at Fine Arts Center for three years. She graduated from Converse College and continued studies at Converse College earning a Master’s Degree in Education. She has been teaching art for 18 years in Greenville and Spartanburg County, and works in a variety of media and techniques including clay, printmaking, painting, and bookmaking. She has received many grants, including a Fulbright Memorial Fund grant to study in Japan, and fellowships to study at Arrowmont School of Crafts and Penland. Her work has been exhibited in shows at the Art Bomb, Open Studios with the Metropolitan Arts Council, the Belton Juried Professional Show, the Anderson Art Show and the Union Juried Professional Show.

“I am so pleased to announce Donna Shank Major as this year’s recipient of the Art Educator Award. Major is an instructor at the Fine Arts Center of Greenville, and together with the other two state finalists, Josh Drews and Mary Catherine Peeples, represents the finest this state has to offer in art education. South Carolina has most definitely set the bar high in fine art instruction,” says Mary Whyte.

Watercolor artist Mary Whyte is a teacher and author whose figurative paintings have earned national recognition. A resident of Johns Island, SC, Whyte garners much of her inspiration from the Gullah descendants of coastal Carolina slaves who number among her most prominent subjects. Her portraits are included in numerous corporate, private, and university collections, as well as in the permanent collections of the Gibbes Museum of Art and the Greenville County Museum of Art. Her paintings have been featured in International Artist, Artist, American Artist, Watercolor, and American Art Collector, L’Art de Aquarelle, and numerous other publications. Whyte is the author of numerous books and her work can be found at Coleman Fine Art in Charleston, where her husband, Smith Coleman, manages the gallery and makes gilded and carved frames.

Applications for the 2015 Mary Whyte Award opened in September, 2014. For more information, please visit (www.marywhyteaward.org).

Established as the Carolina Art Association in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art opened its doors to the public in 1905. In the fall of 2014, the Gibbes temporarily closed for major renovations and will reopen its doors in the spring of 2016. The renovation project is designed to showcase the museum’s collection, provide visitors with a history of American art from the early colonial era to the present, and engage the public with a center for education, artist studios, lecture and event space, a museum café, and store. During the renovation the museum will offer programs such as the Insider Art Series, Art With a Twist, Art of Healing, events including the Art of Design and annual Gibbes on the Street Party, and educational offerings such as Art to Go and Eye Spy Art. Highlights of the Gibbes permanent collection can be viewed on Google Art Project at (www.googleartproject.com).

For further info visit (www.gibbesmuseum.org).

Society 1858 Announces Sonya Clark as the 2014 Winner of the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art in Charleston, SC

September 19, 2014

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Society 1858, an auxiliary group of the Gibbes Museum of Art, in Charleston, SC, is pleased to announce Sonya Clark as the 2014 winner of the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. Awarded annually with a cash prize of $10,000, the 1858 Prize acknowledges an artist whose work demonstrates the highest level of artistic achievement in any media, while contributing to a new understanding of art in the South.

This year, over 250 artists from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia submitted applications. Clark is the first female artist to be awarded the 1858 Prize. Her work examines contemporary issues of gender and race through a variety of mediums.

“Sonya Clark is a phenomenal artist whose intellectual rigor and thoughtful approach to materials stands out from the crowd. Her work truly embodies the spirit of the 1858 Prize and its mission to contribute to a new understanding of contemporary southern art,” says Gibbes Museum Curator of Exhibitions, Pam Wall.

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“My Hair Craft Project (Jamilah)” 2013, by Sonya Clark, photograph, 28″ x 28″.

Clark holds an MFA (Cranbrook Academy of Art), a BFA (Art Institute of Chicago), and a BA in psychology (Amherst College) and chairs the Department of Craft/Material Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. Her work has been exhibited in over 250 museums and galleries in Europe, Africa, Asia, South America, Australia, and throughout the United States.  She uses objects such as cloth, hair, and combs to give voice to the complexity of American identity and history. Simple objects become an interface for dialog that ranges from the vernacular to the political to the poetic.  Her work includes a variety of mediums. In “My Hair Craft Project (Jamilah)” she engages Southern hairdressers to use her body as canvas to re-frame Black hairdressing as art.

“Given the caliber of the finalists, I am absolutely humbled to be chosen for the 1858 Award. The complexities and the simplicities that drive the content of my work will be amplified by this generous support. I am both buoyed by this endorsement of my past work and eager to delve into the well of the next possibilities. To the folks in Society 1858 at the Gibbes Museum: thank you, thank you, thank you,” says Sonya Clark.

Established as the Carolina Art Association in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art opened its doors to the public in 1905.  Located in Charleston’s historic district, the Gibbes houses a premier collection of over 10,000 works, principally American with a Charleston or Southern connection, and presents special exhibitions throughout the year. In addition, the museum offers an extensive complement of public programming and educational outreach initiatives that serve the community by stimulating creative expression and improving the region’s superb quality of life. Highlights of the Gibbes collection can now be viewed on Google Art Project at (www.googleartproject.com).

For further information contact Amy Mercer, Marketing and Communications Manager, Gibbes Museum of Art by calling 843/722-2706 x38 or e-mail to (amercer@gibbesmuseum.org).

The Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, Receives $250,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities

July 23, 2014

On Monday, July 21, 2014, The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced $34 million in grants for 177 humanities projects. The Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston is pleased to be one of two recipients in the state of South Carolina with an award in the amount of $250,000 to improve storage conditions for the Gibbes Museum’s collections, which focus on American art.

Storage furniture will be installed in a new collections suite that is being created as part of the major renovation and expansion of the museum, which will begin in the fall of 2014. The renovation and storage/study suite will go far to help make this knowledge accessible to diverse audiences, and add richness to the visitor experience.

“The National Endowment for the Humanities is proud to support these exceptional research, educational, and public programs in the humanities,” said NEH Acting Chairman Carole Watson. “The projects made possible by these grants will enrich our knowledge of our history and ourselves, encourage reflection on the traditions and values that have shaped our culture, and help preserve and make accessible our nation’s diverse wealth of humanities materials and resources.”

“We are thrilled to receive this wonderful recognition from the National Endowment for the Humanities as the Gibbes Museum is at a defining moment in its history.  The storage project is at the core of our renovation design to ensure long-term, energy-efficient, sustainable preservation upon the collection’s return,” says Zinnia Willits, Director of Collections Administration and project manager for the grant.

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at (www.neh.gov).

Established as the Carolina Art Association in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art opened its doors to the public in 1905. Located along Charleston’s Museum Mile in the heart of historic district, the museum is dedicated to collecting and presenting Southern art from the Colonial period through today. The Gibbes’ permanent collection consists of over 10,000 works, principally American with a Charleston or Southern connection.  The museum offers an impressive roster of special exhibitions and public programs throughout the year.

For further information visit (www.gibbesmuseum.org).

Society 1858 in Charleston, SC, Announces Short List of Finalists for the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art

June 30, 2014

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The Gibbes Museum of Art and Society 1858, in Charleston, SC, announced the 2014 Short List of finalists for the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. Awarded annually with a cash prize of $10,000, the 1858 Prize acknowledges an artist whose work demonstrates the highest level of artistic achievement in any media, while contributing to a new understanding of art in the South. Over 250 artists from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia submitted applications during this time period.

The seven artists (profiled below) selected for the 2014 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art short list are Jim Arendt, Sonya Clark, Andre Leon Gray, Jackson Martin, Jason Mitcham, Damian Stamer, and Stacy Lynn Waddell. The artists were selected by a distinguished panel of judges including Charles Ailstock, Society 1858 Board Member; Jamieson Clair, Society 1858 Board Member; Jennifer Dasal, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art at the North Carolina Museum of Art; Marilyn Laufer, Director of the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University; Frank McCauley, Assistant Director and Curator of the Sumter County Gallery of Art; Pam Wall, Curator of Exhibition at the Gibbes Museum of Art; and John Westmark, artist and 2012 Prize winner.

“We are thrilled to have received so many qualified applicants to the 1858 Prize. Narrowing the list to seven artists was a tough task, but we feel this group represents the great talent and creativity of the contemporary southern art scene,” says Gibbes Museum Curator of Exhibitions Pam Wall.

This prize was established in 2007 by Elizabeth and Mallory Factor to honor an artist whose work contributes to a new understanding of the South. Artist John Westmark was the 2012 prize winner and his work is on view at the Gibbes Museum of Art through August 3 in the exhibition entitled, “John Westmark: Narratives”. After a 1-year hiatus, Society 1858 has rebranded the annual artist award and will focus its fundraising efforts on cultivating the prize. The winner of the 1858 Prize will be announced on Sept. 18, 2014, during an event hosted by Society 1858 and the Gibbes Museum of Art.

2014 Short List Bios

Jim Arendt – Based in Conway, SC, Arendt creates narrative paintings, sculpture, and installations that investigate how individual lives are affected by transitions in economic structures. Made from cut denim, Arendt’s figurative work draws upon his rural upbringing and concepts of work, labor, and connections to the land. Arendt received his BFA from Kendall College of Art & Design and his MFA with a concentration in painting from the University of South Carolina. (www.jimarendt.com)

Sonya Clark – Clark is a fiber and mixed media artist working in Richmond, VA, where she chairs the Department of Craft and Material Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University. She uses objects such as cloth, hair, and combs to give voice to the complexity of American identity and history. Clark’s work has been exhibited in over 250 museums and galleries in Europe, Africa, Asia, South America, Australia, and throughout the United States. (www.sonyaclark.com)

André Leon Gray – A native of Raleigh, NC, Gray is a self-trained artist who works is a variety of media to examine the impact of history and memory on present day power structures and social hierarchies. Gray’s mixed media assemblages, sculptures, and installations combine recycled and reclaimed objects, materials, and imagery. He transforms mundane objects into powerful social commentary with the intent of creating dialogue among his audience. (www.andreleongray.com)

Jackson Martin – Martin’s artistic practice entails an interdisciplinary approach to sculpture, installation, and photography. He utilizes a wide variety of materials and processes, ranging from sewing nontraditional fabrics to steam-bending hardwoods to planting trees in dumpsters. A native of Tennessee, Martin currently resides in Asheville, NC where he teaches at the University of North Carolina – Asheville. (www.jacksonmartin.com)

Jason Mitcham – Mitcham combines painting and stop-motion animation to investigate suburbia, modern ruins, and temporality within the landscape. His animations are created by digitally recording thousands of slight alterations on paintings; approximately ten miniscule changes are made for every second of footage. Mitcham was born in Greensboro, NC, and currently resides in New York. (www.jasonmitcham.com)

Damian Stamer – Stamer depicts barns, abandoned buildings, and other vernacular structures of the rural south. His heavily layered canvases blur the line between abstraction and representation as they seek to express the solemn beauty of the old and overlooked. A native of Durham, NC, Stamer earned a BFA from Arizona State University and an MFA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (www.damianstamer.com)

Stacy Lynn Waddell – Waddell creates work that explores American history, culture, and the ways individual consciousness is formed through generations. She combines watercolor, gold leaf, and collage with heat-based techniques that burn, brand, and singe works on paper. Waddell has exhibited at museums throughout the country, including the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the Gibbes Museum of Art, in the solo exhibition, “The Evidence of Things Unseen”. (www.stacylynnwaddell.com)

Society 1858 is a group of dynamic young professionals who support the Gibbes Museum of Art with social and educational programs tailored for up-and-coming art patrons. Membership to Society 1858 is open to any member of the Gibbes Museum of Art. Society 1858 takes its name from the year that the Carolina Art Association was established. Although the Gibbes Museum of Art opened its doors in 1905, the museum’s art collection began in 1858. Society 1858 aims to continue the strong legacy of art appreciation in Charleston. Members of Society 1858 have access to private exhibition previews and receptions, invitations to social events throughout the year, and free or reduced admission to Society 1858’s exciting programs.

Established as the Carolina Art Association in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art opened its doors to the public in 1905. Located in Charleston’s historic district, the Gibbes houses a premier collection of over 10,000 works, principally American with a Charleston or Southern connection, and presents special exhibitions throughout the year. In addition, the museum offers an extensive complement of public programming and educational outreach initiatives that serve the community by stimulating creative expression and improving the region’s superb quality of life. Highlights of the Gibbes collection can now be viewed on Google Art Project at (www.googleartproject.com).

For further information call the Museum at 843/722-2706 or visit (www.gibbesmuseum.org).

Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, Offers Lecture and Book Signing with Virginia Christian Beach – June 12, 2914

June 11, 2014

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The Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, SC, invites you to join them to celebrate the publication of “Rice & Ducks” with a lecture by author Virginia Christian Beach, on Thursday, June 12, at noon. Following the discussion, books will be available for sale and signing.

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The fee is $15 per person with a box lunch included.

“Rice & Ducks” records the history of the South Carolina rice lands, a landscape that stretches all the way from the Pee Dee River to the Savannah. It is based on a wealth of personal interviews, letters, family papers, plantation and game journals, and other primary source materials. It also draws from experts and scholars in the fields of rice cultivation and plantation history, African-American studies, wetland and waterfowl biology, and wildlife and habitat conservation.

It is a story full of interesting and memorable characters, and unlikely allies. They include English Lords Proprietors, southern plantation owners and slaves, northern industrialists, powerful US Senators, daring scientists, media magnates, Trappist monks, and Wall Street financiers.

“Rice & Ducks” is a beautiful full-color, coffee table  book generously illustrated with archival and  modern photography, as well as maps, drawings  and paintings from both public and private collections.

Virginia Christian Beach is a graduate of the University of Virginia and a former Peace Corps volunteer in East Africa. She writes for numerous local and regional publications on the subjects of conservation and natural history, and is the author of “Medway”, a history of a South Carolina plantation. She has served on the staffs of The Nature Conservancy, the Lowcountry Open Land Trust and the SC Sea Grant Consortium.

For further information visit (www.gibbesmuseum.org/events) or call 843/722-2706 x22 to purchase tickets.


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