Posts Tagged ‘UNC-Chapel Hill’

Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC, to Open Store within its Building – Oct. 6, 2017

August 30, 2017

The Ackland Art Museum announced today that its Museum Store, currently located on East Franklin Street in downtown Chapel Hill, NC, will relocate to inside the Museum building, opening for business on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. The Store will be open at its current location on Franklin Street through Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017.

“It feels like a homecoming,” said Katie Ziglar, Director of the Ackland Art Museum. “We are very pleased that we can bring the Museum Store to the Museum. It is an amenity people wish for while visiting the Ackland.”

“We have valued being a part of the fabric of Franklin Street since May of 2011, and have felt very supported by the town of Chapel Hill, the Downtown Partnership, and our customers,” said Alice Southwick, store manager. “As we have always been part of the Ackland Art Museum, it does feel right to be setting up shop inside the Museum’s building. We think our customers will be very pleased.”

The new Ackland Museum Store will include more products that tie to art and exhibitions on view in the Ackland’s galleries, a move that reflects popular demand. The Store will continue to sell works of art by local, regional, and international artists.

“We look forward to being able to offer shopping at the Museum Store—which, in turn, financially supports the Ackland’s exhibitions and programs—as an experience that immediately follows visiting our galleries,” said Ziglar.

Once inside the Museum building, the Store’s hours will follow the Museum’s: Wednesday through Saturday 10am to 5pm and Sunday 1 to 5pm. Like the Museum, the Store will be open until 9pm during the Chapel Hill-Carrboro 2nd Friday ArtWalk evenings.

Featuring a year-round calendar of special exhibitions and dynamic public programs, the Ackland Art Museum—located on the historic campus of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill—encourages visitors to engage with the artistic past as well as with living artists from around the world. The Ackland’s holdings consist of more than 18,000 works of art, featuring significant collections of European masterworks, twentieth-century and contemporary art, African art, and North Carolina pottery. In addition, the Ackland has North Carolina’s premier collections of Asian art and works on paper (drawings, prints, and photographs). Its global collection of artworks from antiquity to the present makes the Ackland uniquely able to advance the teaching and research missions of the University.

The Ackland Art Museum is located at 101 South Columbia Street, just south of Franklin Street, on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.

Admission to the Ackland Art Museum is free.

More information is available at (ackland.org).

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Katie Ziglar Named Director of Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill in Chapel Hill, NC

April 15, 2016

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The Ackland Art Museum at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, announced today that, following a national search, Katie Ziglar has been appointed as the Director of the Museum. Ziglar is currently the Director of External Affairs at the Freer|Sackler Galleries, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, a position she has held since 2003.

Katie Ziglar, who will begin as Director of the Ackland on July 6, 2016, brings to the position nearly 30 years’ experience as a museum professional. While at the Freer|Sackler, she substantially increased annual fund-raising, from $3M in FY07 to $12M in FY12, and participated in the leadership of the $1.5B Smithsonian campaign.

She has also contributed substantially to the successful management of other major cultural organizations including the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, and the National Gallery of Art.

“We are delighted that Katie Ziglar will join the Ackland Art Museum as the new director,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. “Katie brings significant experience from her work at the Smithsonian Institution, where she contributed to increasing visibility and financial stability. We look forward to her leadership and vision for the Ackland Art Museum.”

“Katie’s experience with the Smithsonian Institution, most recently at the Freer|Sackler Galleries, brings a great depth and knowledge of building community affinity groups in working with collections, especially their Asian collection,” said James Keith Brown, chair of the Ackland Art Museum’s National Advisory Board. “Her background is key for the Ackland, given our various constituents, and our focus on Asian and contemporary works of art.”

Ziglar received a BA in history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a John Motley Morehead scholar, and an MA in Islamic art and architecture from American University in Cairo. She currently serves as a board member of UNC-Chapel Hill’s Morehead-Cain Scholarship Fund.

“I am honored to have been selected to serve as Director of the Ackland Art Museum, and I look forward to returning to UNC-Chapel Hill in this position,” said Ziglar. “The Ackland is a vibrant, inspiring resource for this important global public research university as well as the entire Triangle community, the state of North Carolina, and our nation. I am eager to build on the incredible work of the Museum’s staff to further and deepen the Ackland’s role in scholarship and especially public engagement.”

The Ackland Art Museum is located on the historic campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Ackland’s holdings consist of more than 17,000 works of art, featuring significant collections of European masterworks, twentieth-century and contemporary art, African art, North Carolina pottery, and folk art. In addition, the Ackland has North Carolina’s premier collections of Asian art and works on paper (drawings, prints, and photographs). In 2016-17, the Ackland-organized exhibition “Fever Within: The Art of Ronald Lockett” will travel to the American Folk Art Museum, New York, and the High Museum of Art, Atlanta. GA.

The Ackland Art Museum is located at 101 South Columbia Street on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.

Museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday 10-5, and Sunday 1-5. Admission is free.

More information about the Ackland is available at (www.ackland.org).

UNC–Chapel Hill and Wake Forest University to Debate at North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, NC – Mar. 29, 2014

March 19, 2014

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On Mar. 29, 2014, the North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA) in Raleigh, NC, East Building, Museum Auditorium, will host a debate between the Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Wake Forest University Debate Team. The debaters will respond to the statement “The objectification of culture into art is damaging to that culture” and will address issues also highlighted in the Museum’s spring exhibition “Estampas de la raza: Prints for the People/The Romo Collection”. The event is free; ticket from Box Office is required.

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Lawrence Colación, “Veterano,” 1995, screen print, 37 5/8 x 25 ¾ in., Collection of the McNay Art Museum, Gift of Harriett and Ricardo Romo, 2009.43, © 2013 Lawrence Colación

At the conclusion of the debate, audience members will be invited to ask the students questions, offer commentary, and join in a conversation about the topics and perspectives introduced during the arguments.

“The debate explores issues of tradition and identity in works of art and will be a great lead-in to “Estampas de la raza,” which addresses these topics as pertaining to Hispanic culture in particular,” says Jennifer Dasal, the NCMA’s associate curator of contemporary art and the curator of “Estampas de la raza”. “We are hoping for lively, thought-provoking audience involvement to start a discussion about these extremely important issues.”

This is the third college debate that the Museum has held in conjunction with a special exhibition and the first to feature two universities taking opposing sides of an argument.

Deborah Reid Murphy, the Museum’s coordinator of adult programs, says college debates are valuable for both the students and the Museum. “This is a special opportunity for college students to take center stage—literally—and discuss issues addressed by these significant works of art,” Reid Murphy explains. “The debate allows us to start a multigenerational conversation between the students and members of the audience that is sure to uncover many different viewpoints and stories.”

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years, from ancient Egypt to the present, making the institution one of the premier art museums in the South. The Museum’s collection provides educational, aesthetic, intellectual, and cultural experiences for the citizens of North Carolina and beyond. The 164-acre Museum Park showcases the connection between art and nature through site-specific works of environmental art. The Museum offers changing national touring exhibitions, classes, lectures, family activities, films, and concerts.

For further information call the Museum at 919/839-6262 or visit (www.ncartmuseum.org).

Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC, Brings Interactive, Large-scale Chalk to UNC-Chapel Hill Campus – Mar. 25-27, 2013

March 21, 2013

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In conjunction with the final week of its current exhibition of contemporary art, “More Love: Art, Politics, and Sharing since the 1990s,” the Ackland Art Museum, Chapel Hill, NC, is pleased to present the interactive, ephemeral art work “Chalk” by Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla.

From 1pm on Monday, Mar. 25, 2013, through 1pm, Wednesday, Mar. 27, 2013, twelve large pieces of chalk – each 64 inches long, eight inches in diameter, and weighing approximately 100 pounds – will be publically on view and available for use in Union Plaza, in front of the F.P. Graham Student Union, at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Since 1998, Allora and Calzadilla have placed oversized chalk sticks within public spaces in many different cities around the world. Made available to passers-by, “Chalk” encourages written and drawn exchanges between citizens and engagement with the urban landscape itself. Like many other works of art in the exhibition “More Love,” the pieces of chalk are catalysts, requiring action on the part of individuals other than the artists to activate them. Although Chalk has been staged in several different cities, each iteration of the project brings its own idiosyncratic response and allows the work to maintain a sense of site-specificity, reflecting the particular concerns and conditions of a given locale. By enlarging and unleashing a conventional stick of chalk on the campus of a leading research university, Allora and Calzadilla transform a pedagogical tool of the classroom into an instrument of communication and critique. The Union Plaza, already a popular forum for self-expression and knowledge sharing, will be further transformed, if only temporarily, by drawings, commentary, and other forms of written and illustrated expression.

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“More Love: Art, Politics, and Sharing since the 1990s” at the Ackland Art Museum is the first major exhibition to investigate the ways in which contemporary artists have addressed love as a political force, as a philosophical model for equitable knowledge exchange, and as social interaction within a rapidly changing landscape of technology and social media.

Organized by consulting curator Claire Schneider, “More Love” includes 48 works of art by 33 emerging and established contemporary artists who actively engage with love and the many ways it can be expressed through beauty, emotion, humor, texts, elaborate craft, sound environments, and interactive projects. For each of these artists, love is a significant tool or strategy that constitutes a creative practice built on generosity, inclusiveness, sharing, and questioning.

The Ackland Art Museum is located on the historic campus of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  The Ackland’s holdings consist of more than 16,000 works of art, featuring significant collections of European masterworks, twentieth-century and contemporary art, African art, North Carolina pottery, and folk art.  In addition, the Ackland has North Carolina’s premier collections of Asian art and works on paper (drawings, prints, and photographs).  As an academic unit of the University, the Ackland serves broad local, state, and national constituencies.

The Ackland Art Museum is located on South Columbia Street, near the corner of East Franklin Street, on the campus of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Parking is available at several nearby municipal and private parking decks, and at meters on Franklin Street.

More information is available by calling 919/966-5736 or visiting (www.ackland.org).

Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC, Offers Art for Lunch – Dec. 5, 2012

December 3, 2012

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The Ackland Art Museum in Chapel Hill, NC, will offer an Art for Lunch event on Dec. 5, 2012, from noon-1pm, entitled, “The Art and Politics of Samurai Sociability” by Morgan Pitelka, UNC-Chapel Hill – Asian Studies

Bring a bag lunch (yes, people do!) and enjoy an hour of inspiration and information about art currently on view at the Ackland.

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Utagawa Kunisada, Japanese, 1786-1864, Actor: Samurai in Black, color woodblock print. UNC Art Department Collection

Although usually thought of as individualist swordfighters and rigid adherents to the honorable Bushido code of ethics, Japan’s pre-modern warriors, the samurai, were profoundly social animals. This talk will illustrate the role of art in the interactions between elite warriors in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with a particular focus on banqueting, gift-giving, and other forms of politicized sociability.

Presented in connection with the exhibition Pictures of Vanity Fair: The Traditional Japanese Print, on view through Jan. 6, 2013.

RSVP to by e-mail to (acklandRSVP@unc.edu). Free to members and valid UNC One Card holders or $5 for all others.

Art For Lunch is supported in part by Drs. Leena and Sheldon Peck.

Ackland Art Museum at UNC- Chapel Hill, NC, Presents Lecture by Eric L. Muller on Japanese American Incarceration During WWII – Oct. 10, 2012

October 8, 2012

Ackland Art Museum at UNC- Chapel Hill, NC,  will present the lecture, “Colors of Confinement: Rare Color Photographs of Japanese American Incarceration in World War II”, by Eric Muller, of University of North Carolina School of Law, on Oct. 10, 2012, at 2pm.

In 1942, Bill Manbo (1908-1992) and his family were forced from their Hollywood home into a Japanese American internment camp at Heart Mountain, Wyoming. While there, Manbo documented both the bleakness and beauty of his surroundings, using Kodachrome film, a technology then just seven years old, to capture community celebrations and to record his family’s struggle to maintain a normal life under the harsh conditions of racial imprisonment. In this talk, Eric Muller will present a number of Manbo’s photographs and talk about what they show – and what they conceal – about the wartime imprisonment of Japanese Americans.

Eric L. Muller is the Dan K. Moore Distinguished Professor in Jurisprudence and Ethics at the University of North Carolina School of Law and director of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Center for Faculty Excellence. He is author of “American Inquisition: The Hunt for Japanese American Disloyalty in World War II” and “Free to Die for Their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters in World War II”.

Free to Ackland Members and $10 each for Members’ guests. Reservation required; e-mail to (acklandRSVP@unc.edu).

Following his talk, Muller will be signing his new monograph of the same title at the Ackland Museum Store.