Posts Tagged ‘Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail’

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail Installs #210 Bee Well Honey Quilts in Pickens, SC

May 6, 2018

Donna and Kerry Owen, owners and operators of the Bee Well Honey business in Pickens, SC, are now also the proud owners of an array of quilt blocks on their Natural Market & Gift Store. The original quilts were fashioned by a variety of quilters and reproduced in graphic form, to display on the exterior of the business that will be enjoyed by visitors to downtown Pickens, the Doodle Trail and Park. These quilts were supported through the Pickens County ATAX Commission grant to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail.

“Buzz In” a quilt square created by Joy duBois and Sue Hackett, was made at the request of the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail to honor the Owens’ honey business. Joy found a pattern that everyone loved, pieced and quilted a lovely wall hanging that is now hanging inside the market. Sue Hackett, a quilter and member of the Oconee County Quilt Trail Production Team, did the embroidery on the quilted wall hanging. Joy loved the square so much that she has also produced the entire quilt for fun!

“Star Puzzle”, a vintage quilt from Donna’s side of the family, was discovered on a shelf at her mother, Pat Fisher’s, home in Rosman, NC. It was quilted by Donna’s grandmother, Alma Galloway Bruner, whom she called “Nanny.” Alma was born in Transylvania County, NC, on December 24, 1912. She married Addison William Bruner and lived on Highway 64 in that same county. The Bruners had 3 children, Pat Fisher, who was Donna’s mother, Jimmy who died in a drowning accident in his early 20s, and Bill Bruner who is a preacher at Rocky Bottom Baptist Church in Pickens County. “Star Puzzle” was made during the 1940-50s, squares sewn by Alma and quilted with the help of Geniva Holcombe and Madari Powell.

Donna’s fondest memories of Alma’s quilts were their comfort and heaviness while sleeping at her Nanny’s home, where there was no central heating. “The weight of those quilts would make me feel toasty on the coldest of nights and made me feel safe during summer thunderstorms!”

“Ode to a Sunflower”, was created by Vivian Perry, a member of the Upcountry Quilters’ Guild in Pickens County. Vivian and her husband, Tommy, moved to the upstate 5 years ago and live in Easley. She bought a long-arm quilting machine in 2004 and began quilting for customers, which she continued for 12 years. She now makes T-shirt quilts, has an Etsy shop called EggMoneyQuilts and an internet business: (https://tshirtquiltcompany.com).

Vivian’s inspiration for the “Sunflower Quilt” came from her love of the outdoors. She grew up in the country and she’d rather be outside than inside! She has always loved how sunflowers seem to stretch to soak in all the sunshine. There’s no pattern for this quilt; Vivian doesn’t use patterns. She prefers to make it up as she goes!

“Landscape” created by the well-known art quilter, Dottie Moore, whose work can be found in fine galleries throughout the world, was found at Boxwood Manor, the home of Annette Buchanan, during a UHQT Board meeting. Kim Smagala, Director of the Greater Pickens Chamber of Commerce, took one look at this tiny wonder, and said, “We have to paint this!”

Dottie has been creating what she calls visual conversations with fabric and thread since the 1980s. She is inspired by nature and every piece she fashions includes some part or all of a tree. Dottie lives in Rock Hill, SC. She teaches, lectures throughout the country and is the founder of Piecing a Quilt of Life, an international project dedicated to empowering senior women by recognizing their creative abilities. Her web site is (http://www.dottiemoore.com).

Bee Well Honey is known across the Southeast as a producer of delicious raw honey. They also offer a full line of beekeeping supplies. Kerry Owen was introduced to honeybees as a child growing up in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. His father, grandfather and neighbors had beehives or “bee gums” as a source of honey for the family. “You know sometimes, you just trip and stumble into the path you’re supposed to take,” Kerry explains, “but that is exactly what happened to me and my family. Bee Well Honey started in our kitchen, expanded into the garage, then into a rough sawn lumber barn and now we have buildings and honeybees scattered all across South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia. We are still paying our dues and if it where not for my beekeeper friends there would be no Bee Well Honey and I will always remember that.”

Bee Well Honey and the Owens family offer a full line of beekeeping supplies, honeybee packages, queens and 100% pure raw honey, as well as a natural market featuring organic and natural foods. For further info visit (http://www.beewellhoneynaturalmarket.com).

For further info about the Quilt Trail call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

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Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail Offers Quilt Block to Honor UHQT Quilter of the Year – #208 Wild Thing

February 27, 2018

In 2016, The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail (UHQT) announced the selection of Anderson city resident, Diane Schonauer, as the UHQT quilter of the year. This program is sponsored by the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail to recognize a resident of either Anderson, Oconee or Pickens County who is a quilter and has provided community service and leadership through their quilting.


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Schonauer, a transplant from Illinois, began quilting over twenty five years ago and has experimented with both fiber quilts and hand painted wooden and aluminum quilt panels.

Philanthropy is a core value of Schonauer’s. Her work with the Anderson quilt Guilds, Quilters of South Carolina, Anderson Quilts of Valor and the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail and other community organizations keeps her very busy most days of the week.

As the quilter of the year the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail sponsors a quilt in honor of the awardee. Schonauer selected one of her quilts “Wild Thing” to be replicated. She opted to donate the hand painted quilt panel to the City of Anderson. The City of Anderson has placed it on the city parking garage, located at the corner of Murray and 130 W. Whitner Streets, this is the perfect location as one of the buildings visitors to Anderson pass on their trip.

For additional information about the City and its attractions visit (http://downtownandersonsc.com/). Also visit (http://www.visitanderson.com/) to explore the many interesting and fun options throughout the county.

For further info about the Quilt Trail call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Oconee County Arts & Historical Ambassador Award Was Awarded to Martha File in Upstate, SC

January 31, 2018

The Oconee County Arts & Historical Commission announces Martha File as the recipient of the 2017 Arts and Historical Ambassador Award. File is the inaugural winner of the Ambassador Award, created to recognize a volunteer with “Outstanding Contributions” in the fields of Art, History or Culture in Oconee County. The Ambassador Award honors achievements that extend beyond the expected and make a difference in our community.

Martha File, a founding member of the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail (UHQT), has worked diligently to educate and grow the efforts of South Carolina’s first quilt trail. Oconee County was the first County in South Carolina to embrace the quilt trail concept and there are now over 200 quilts on display across Oconee, Anderson and Pickens Counties. File has coordinated trail expansion, recruited numerous volunteers and as a result, the trail now has a studio in each of the three counties. In addition, she has worked with other counties across South Carolina and neighboring states to introduce and provide resources for additional quilt trails.

Mari Noorai, chairperson of the arts and historical commission says, “Martha’s service to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail has promoted Oconee County and its heritage. Her dedication and unwavering initiative make Martha the 2017 Arts & Historical Ambassador. Many thanks to Martha and all our exemplary volunteers that help us to ‘Celebrate Oconee.'”

Phil Shirley, director of parks, recreation and tourism for Oconee County says, “I remember Martha’s very first pitch to me about the idea of a quilt trail in 2009. I never imagined it growing to over 200 quilts and spreading across the Upstate. File’s dedication and leadership bring a shining light to our community and we congratulate her on being named the 2017 Oconee County Arts and Historical Ambassador of the Year.”

File says, “On behalf of the all the volunteers of the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail we are honored to have been selected for this award. Helping preserve and promote the history of the Upstate through quilts and sharing the stories of those who made them is a very rewarding experience for us. We would like to thank the many people who have helped us on the journey and we look forward to the new adventures that await us.”

File will be recognized and presented an engraved plaque at the Spring Arts and Historical reception. In addition, a donation will be made in her honor to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail.

For more information on the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail, visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Added Number 203 Quilt Block

November 13, 2017

“The name of this quilt pattern is a Star Flower however, we call the quilt Granny Morris’s Dresses since my Maternal Grandmother, Julia Kemp Morris, sewed this quilt back in the early 1940s from fabrics of her old dresses and my grandfather’s shirts,” says Jeanie Morehead Christopher. Julia probably learned the art of quilting from her mother. Most likely, she and her 5 sisters passed the time away while quilting together. “My grandfather, Joseph Walker Morris, bought his first truck when he was 38 years old in 1927. He built a lucrative business known in the Anderson area as J. W. Morris Transfer. Later, the name was changed to Morris Van Lines as that is the name on all the advertising memorabilia (key chains, pencils, pens & business cards) we have in the family. Morris Van Lines moved to Belton Highway in July 1948 where it remained until liquidation by his children in 1993. Both of his children, O. V. Morris and Jeanette Morris Moorhead were involved in this business venture until their retirement. Mr. Morris’ son-in-law James Robert Moorhead was also employed by the company until his retirement in 1982,” adds Christopher.

This quilt is placed on the site of the Morris’ home at 2023 E. River Street (Belton Highway) in Anderson, SC. Hill Electric and Morris Van Lines were business neighbors for many years and Hill Electric bought the property in the 1990’s. They renovated the warehouses and office spaces to suit their electric business. “My grandparents’ home became their temporary offices while they did the remodeling. After a recent tour of the home and the warehouses, I found that much of it remains as it was when I was a child. Roller skating around the transfer trucks and having talent shows in my grandparent’s attic and basement are fond memories at Granny’s house,” say Christopher. “I also recall being able to see the double ferris wheel at the Anderson Fair Grounds from an attic window. We grandchildren would slide down the hill beside the house on broken down packing boxes from the moving business. Granny made fig preserves from her fig tree that is still standing at the bottom of this hill.”

“This quilt has already been a great example of how the Upstate Quilt Trail brings families back together. My first cousin and I have been in contact many times over the last few months while this quilt was being painted. I learned during those conversations that her daughter (the next generation!) has many fond memories of Granny’s house, her meals, her sewing, her garden in the back of the lot and playing as well around the transfer trucks. This would be Granny’s great-grand daughter and she hopes to come up to Anderson and see the quilt installed as well as get a current tour of the house where we all had such a good time!,” adds Christopher.

For further info about the Quilt Trail call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Offers Studio Update

October 6, 2017

It’s been a busy summer for the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail (UHQT). We have opened a new studio in Pickens County at the Holly Springs Center and moved the Walhalla studio to the former Oakway Intermediate School in Westminster. The Anderson studio is still located at the Anderson Arts Center. All the studios are integral components of the UHQT and production of quilt panels. All our production teams are hard at work and looking forward to a busy fall and winter. Direct communication links are highlighted.

Anderson County
110 Federal Street, Anderson
Painting studio located in the Old Carnegie Library Basement
Hours: Fridays 9:30 – Noon
Contact: Diane Schonauer by calling 864/231-9317

Oconee County
150 Schoolhouse Road, Westminster, former Oakway Intermediate School
Hours: Tuesday and Thursday, from 9:30 – Noon
Contact: Chris Troy by calling 864/985-1096

Pickens County
Holly Springs Center
120 Holly Springs School Road, Pickens, Room #110
Hours: Thursday and First and Third Saturdays, from 10:00 -2:00. Check Face Book for updates Holly Springs Center Quilt Painting Group
Contact: Cindy Blair by calling 864/973-3921

Visit our Face Book page for production updates and news. Please contact us at 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail of South Carolina to Honor Lucy Harward as the 2017 UHQT Quilter of the Year in Pickens, SC – Oct. 6, 2017

September 29, 2017

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail of South Carolina is pleased to announce a reception to honor Lucy Harward of Pickens, SC, as the 2017 UHQT Quilter of the Year. The Quilter of the Year Program was initiated in 2010 to recognize a quilter who has provided community service and leadership through their quilting. The UHQT receives much support from the quilting community, it is our way to say thank you to artists who provide service to their community.


Lucy Harward and her husband Dale.

The public is cordially invited to the Pickens Community Center in Pickens, SC, at 10am on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017, to celebrate Harward’s many contributions to the community. There will be an exhibition of some of her quilts, in the Granger Fiber Arts Room of the Center. Refreshments will be provided in the Jack Black Room by the UHQT and the Pickens Senior Center. Three of the quilts from the trail that Harward created will be on display in the Jack Black Room. Tours of the facility and its collection of fiber arts and antique sewing items will be available.

Lucy Harward is the driving force of the Granger Fabric Arts room at the Community Center in the City of Pickens. She resides, with her husband Dale, on a beautiful farm, located halfway between Pickens and Pumpkintown. She is a life-long seamstress, completing her first dress at nine years of age, with, as she says, “a zipper down the back.” Harward began quilting approximately 30 years ago when she and Dale lived in Winter Garden, FL. She was taking classes in a shop on tailoring and dressmaking and admired the quilts displayed there. The rest is history, as they say!

Upon retirement 18 years ago, she and Dale moved back to Pickens where Harward grew up and attended her daddy’s church, Grace Methodist, went to school at Pickens Junior & Senior High, and walked down the old Doodle Trail with her friend Jane Eckman so many years ago.
Harward is also a long time member and past president of the UpCountry Quilt Guild. Her many accomplishments include fund raising and grant writing for the Pickens Community Center and the Hagood Auditorium, weekly volunteering and serving on the board of Canon Hospital, volunteer coordinator for Meals on Wheels and developing a variety of ministries and outreach throughout the county. She shares her expertise with any learners who come her way, creating a plethora of classes in the fiber arts.

As Harward states, “I help people achieve things that they would like to achieve!”

For further information call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in SC, Adds New Quilt Block

August 30, 2017

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in SC, continues to grow as a destination for travelers interested in quilts, barns, outdoor art and the history of the Upstate.

Heidi Wolko, a renowned quilter whose creations have been exhibited at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, Kentucky told us that this work was “one of 31 pieces from three different art quilt groups. They were all part of the Everchanging River that Bonnie Ouellette, our “Thread Heads Mother”, had dreamt up. Needless to say, all of us felt extremely honored about the invitation from the museum to exhibit after the “River” had traveled around the U.S. for about three years. Following the exhibit at the museum, the “River” made one more long trip – to Taiwan – until the individual pieces were returned to their creators.”

Her quilt, “Illusion”, is the two hundredth two addition to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail. The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail sponsored this quilt for the Anderson Arts Center and it will join the other painted art quilt already on display at the Art Center Building located at 110 W. Federal Street, Anderson, South Carolina. The inspiration fabric quilt was shown along with another of Ms. Wolko’s quilts at the Double Illusions show sponsored by the Anderson Arts Center in 2015. Attendees at the show cast their votes for the quilt they thought should be added to the Arts Center building. The Illusion quilt had been displayed in Wolko’s Fair Play, SC home but after its selection for the UHQT, Ms. Wolko donated the quilt for an auction to benefit the Arts Center.

Wolko is a self-taught quilter who designed and made this quilt in 2008. The quilt was inspired by the book Blockbender Quilts written by Margaret J. Miller. This book encouraged Wolko to experiment with color. Wolko is a fiber artist whose use of texture, color and design has made a name for herself in the quilting community. She is the recipient of several quilting awards and continues to share her ideas and encouragement with other quilters. “One thing is for sure – I certainly LOVE color.” Images of some of her creations can be found by Googling Heidi Wolko.

For further info call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC Installs Quilt Block #200 and #201

June 12, 2017

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC celebrated its 200th quilt square, To the Mountains, at the Greater Pickens Chamber of Commerce at 222 W. Main St. in Pickens, SC. For eight years, the Quilt Trail has grown, block by block, into a meaningful part of Upstate South Carolina’s landscape for locals who want to preserve the history and traditions of the area. While the Quilt Trail is built, perpetuated, and maintained by locals with a passion for their history, it is also a unique experience for visitors to the area. The Trail appeals to those who enjoy art, nature, history, crafting, story-telling, and even just taking a car ride through the countryside.

As the UHQT has grown over the years, it has forged a path through the lives of so many in its surrounding communities. The members of the Trail are comprised of people who have had the tradition of quilting passed down to them, those whose created the tradition for themselves, and those who are not quilters but still help make the trail possible in various ways. There are now two teams of over 20 volunteers in Anderson and Oconee Counties and soon Pickens County who contribute over 7,000 hours per year giving presentations, painting quilt squares with members of the community, and finding ways to improve and promote this priceless resource. This art form has woven its way into the hearts of this community and beyond.

The original quilt, To the Mountains, a small landscape piece, was created by Joy duBois of Seneca. Joy met a quilter by the name of Gail Sexton, at the Upcountry Quilters Guild which meets at the Pickens Presbyterian Church in Pickens. Joy subsequently took a class that Gail was teaching in a new landscaping technique at the former local quilt shop, Heirlooms and Comforts. She enjoyed the class and the teacher so much that she went on meeting Gail for weekly sessions where they quilted together. Joy has many quilts in her “stash,” both landscape and appliqued borders that Gail designed and Joy has hand quilted.

When it came time to choose the quilt to adorn the Greater Chamber of Commerce building for the 200th block installment, this landscape quilt of mountains, rivers and a foreground of flowers and a tree was chosen from a group beautiful little landscape quilts by Kimberly Smagala, a life-long friend of Joy’s as well as the newest Chamber Executive Director.

For Kim and Joy, it all began 30 years ago. “My family moved from Texas when I was 5 years old and my baby quilt had shouldered a lot of love and use. My mother started working in a real estate with Jere, Joy’s husband. That is when we first met she mended and refurbished my quilt several times for me as I grew up. Joy has made myself, my mother, and my children many quilts throughout the years, including baby quilts. She and her husband are like family. ”

“The chamber office is the first stop for many visitors who visit our city. It is our hope to highlight more quilts throughout the Main Street corridor and around town as a part of a walking/bike tour. Quilting is part of our rich heritage and we are surrounded by so many talented quilters locally, especially those from the Upcountry Quilters’ Guild. We look forward to not only seeing more renderings of these beautiful quilts throughout downtown Pickens, but also creating a destination spot similar to what Landrum and Westminster, SC have accomplished.”

“A quilt warms the body and the soul, having this remarkable painted quilt panel by these talented artists portraying the beautiful craftsmanship that Joy put into this piece is amazing,” stated Smagala. This quilt panel was funded through the Pickens County ATAX Commission to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail.

201st UHQT Quilt The Cross

The Cross quilt is the 201st quilt added to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail. It is displayed on the Westminster Baptist Church, 212 East Windsor in Westminster, SC. The painted quilt block was sponsored by members of the Westminster Baptist Church. The Cross quilt block was designed by Janet Houts and taught during a quilting retreat at Kanuga Episcopal Camp in Hendersonville, NC attended by Paige Price and Denise McCormick.

Paige and Denise knew it would be perfect for their church and fellow quilters, Deanna DeFoor and Beckie DeFoor. Together they joined efforts and worked to piece and quilt a wall hanging, measuring 30 inches by 42 inches, as a gift to the members of the congregation. It was first displayed in the church on Easter Sunday, 2015. Several member of the church helped to paint the quilt block and it was presented to the congregation on Easter Sunday 2017. Being on the quilt trail allows everyone who passes by to enjoy the beauty of the fabric and painted quilts.

The cross is a Christian symbol that represents Jesus’s victory over sin and death. We are reminded about God and His plan of redemption through the symbolic significance of colors in the Bible. The two main colors of Westminster Baptist Church quilt are blue and gold. Blue is the color of the sky and a reminder of the heavenly realm. It also signifies the Healing Power of God. Gold represents God’s love because His love is more precious and more valuable than all the gold in the world. Love is the gold of God.

Westminster Baptist Church has been in the heart of town for more than 130 years. In the 1870’s, the town of Westminster, named after the original church located in a log building situated on the site of the Westminster First Baptist Church, grew up along the railroad and soon developed into a bustling business area. As the population shifted more toward the commercial area, some members of the church decided to build a church nearer the center of town. In 1884, they established a church ‘in the heart of town’. Now, more than 130 years later, the motto “In the heart of town, with a heart for the people” is still a principle held by its members. Located on E. Windsor Street, the church strives “to reach and develop devoted followers of Jesus Christ who love Him, grow in Him, and serve others in His name.”

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC Adds Quilt Block #199

May 31, 2017

Driving down Sandy Springs Road in North West Anderson County, SC, through rolling farm land you will find Bruce and Toni Smith’s home. They have sponsored the 199th quilt location on the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC.

The Lone Star quilt block can be viewed on their barn at 1101 Sandy Springs Road. We asked the Smith’s how they selected this quilt for their barn. They said, “We were in the little Amish town of Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania, and went into a store that had quilts for sale. It was here that we were amazed with all the quilts to choose from but Toni couldn’t decide on one that she was really taken with. A young Amish girl suggested that we go out into the country side and find a lady that made quilts at her home and that she really did beautiful work. We did find her the next day and made a very satisfying purchase of this quilt at her home.” Mrs. Smith stated that she has always loved quilts and wanted a quilt for their home. She continues to use the Lone Star quilt to adorn their home and now their barn.

The Smith’s live on a farm that has been in Bruce’s’ family since 1949. His family moved to this farm the year he was born and still possess the wagon his father used to move the family to their new home. They have primarily been cattle farmers and continue to run a few head of cattle. They love the rolling hills and open spaces and have a lovely bed of roses.

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD, Quilt historian states in her article “The Lone Star Quilt Design Through Time” that, ”The Lone Star quilt block is likely one of the most recognizable quilt patterns to Americans. It is also one of the oldest patterns, along with the Mariner’s Compass, Orange Peel, Job’s Trouble and Irish chain. But this is a pattern known by many names. There are variations of it with 6 points, 8 points (the most common design) or even more…”. This old multi-pieced star block is known by many names. The Mathematical Star was an early name used in England and along the Eastern US seaboard, especially near Baltimore.

The Star of Bethlehem is a well-known name for it all around the country and is still used today. Other names for the same pattern are the Star of the East, Morning Star, which is what Native American’s call it, and Lone star, which is the name given to this pattern by Texan quilters because they are called the lone star state…The Amish liked the large central Star pattern, as did the southern states, across the US. The Central States made their fair share, but it seems more were made closer to the last quarter of the 19th century and in to the 20th century’s first two quarters.” Source: New Pathways Into Quilt History.

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Adds Three New Quilt Blocks

April 27, 2017

# 196 “The Together Tree” and #197 “Star of Leadership”

The first two quilts displayed on Pickens County schools can be found at West End Elementary School on Pelzer Highway, just south of Route 123 as you enter Easley, SC, from the west. They are funded by the school and are the brainchildren of the principal, Angie Rodgers. Resident art teacher, Christina Covington’s 4th grade art students participated in the painting of both “Star of Leadership” and “The Together Tree.” The students also submitted names for the two squares, which were then selected by vote. Covington also was involved in painting, taking time off from her Christmas holiday to come to the Walhalla, SC, studio to paint the geometric details of the background in the “Star of Leadership” quilt square.

“The Together Tree” is based originally on an art project designed by a former art teacher, Erin Murphy, at the school. This framed painting hangs in the front entrance of the school and is decorated with the fingerprints of students and teachers at West End. “The fingerprints symbolize that we are all part of something bigger and how we all work together in our own unique and special ways,” states Covington.

The original quilts were also the inspiration of West End’s current principal, Angie Rodgers, who asked a group of quilters, mostly made up of retired West End teachers, to design and sew two hanging quilt squares for the school to display on the walls. Members of this quilting circle meet weekly to sew and also take sewing trips together. The group started approximately eight years ago and includes; Gail King, Janet Hadaway, Kathy Peot, Beth Holcombe and Paula Grant. King and Hadaway were former 4th grade teachers and Holcombe taught 5th grade. Peot is a retired nurse, but is also the mom of former West End students! Grant, a retired 5th grade Science teacher and the youngest of the quilters has recently retired from West End and can now participate fully in the fun.

“The Together Tree”, designed by Janet Hadaway, depicts a tree, surrounded by an appliqued window frame and decorated with actual buttons on a raindrop printed background. This quilt celebrates the diversity of West End as well as the many students who have come and gone through the school.

The “Star of Leadership”, also created as a quilted wall hanging was designed by Beth Holcombe. This block is a variation of the traditional “Star of the Alamo” block pattern. It was inspired by the bright, primary colored blocks in the tiled floors of the hallways of the school, especially where the halls meet at an intersection. This pattern was chosen for its likeness to a compass, directing students to move forward to reach their goals.

The two quilt squares are mounted in front of the school, on a brick marquee, formerly used for school signage and the fabric quilts will be displayed in the school building.

Quilt block #198 has been added to the array of quilts in Anderson, SC

Reagan Smith of 26 Oleander Drive selected a “LeMoyne Star” for placement on her backyard fence. Lystra Seymour from Anderson, SC, made the fabric quilt Smith told us:

“Mrs. Seymour husband is a physician that I call on and he proudly displays his wife’s quilts in his office waiting room as well as his patient rooms….this particular quilt happened to be in his back patient room several years ago when it truly caught my eye… knew that with its simplistic design and bold colors that this was the quilt block design I wanted!”

“This eight point star has many names ‘LeMoyne Star’, ‘Puritan Star’ and ‘Lemon Star’ to name a few. There are several theories on who created this pattern. One theory is that the LeMoyne brothers Pierre and Jean Baptist who founded New Orleans had this particular star pattern prominent in Jean Baptiste’s coat of arms. The earliest published date of the ‘LeMoyne Star’ is in a collection of patterns attributed to Joseph Doyle in 1911, according to Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of ‘Pieced Quilt Patterns’. The configuration falls into the category of ‘Eight-pointed/45 degree Diamond Stars’. Doyle called this pattern ‘Puritan Star’ as the design traveled throughout the country the name became corrupted into ‘Lemon Star’.”

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).