Posts Tagged ‘Visiting North Carolina’

Folk Art Center in Asheville, NC, Offers Fiber Weekend – May 13-14, 2017

May 11, 2017

On Saturday, May 13 and Sunday, May 14, 2017, the fiber community of the Southern Highland Craft Guild will gather in sharing their knowledge and skills. An open and free event to the public, Fiber Weekend is held annually at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Asheville, NC. From 10-4pm on Saturday, more than two dozen members will be demonstrating their craft processes, with and invitation for visitors to get hands-on with all sorts of fiber. Sunday will hold the 18th annual Fashion Show of Wearable Art from 1-4pm. Southern Highland Craft Guild is proud to announce Echoview Fibermill, JB Media Group and SPC Manufacturing as sponsors of Fiber Weekend.

Generally, fiber wares and products undergo a minimum of five processes for its completion, including carding, spinning, dyeing, weaving and sewing. Due to these multiple stages, often small, specialized groups form in mastering a single process. Groups such as the Embroiderer’s Guild, Tarheels Ruggers, and The Mountain Lacers all will be showcasing these niche skills on Saturday.


Spinners from the Blue Ridge region gather at their wheels as they process fibers into yarn. Photo by Diana Gates.

“These organizations provide space for collaboration, innovation, as well as education,” says Guild Education Coordinator Deb Schillo. “Throughout history there have been groups forming around fiber, and it is certainly a testament to how important craft is in building community.”

Schillo is also the librarian and archivist at the Southern Highland Craft Guild. She and regionally acclaimed weaver Barbara Miller just finished their second publication about fiber. Frances Goodrich’s “Coverlet and Counterpane Drafts” will be available to the public for purchase at the event for $45. Miller’s knowledge about fiber is extensive, and has been able to highlight how certain processes have transformed.

“When we first began to read the different dye recipes that were being used several decades ago, we had to make sure that folks did not repeat them,” says Miller. “With some asking to add lye, following with directive to taste the water for sweetness…well, we had to say, ‘don’t try this at home’!

The dye process of yarns and fabrics is often one of the more laborious parts of transforming fiber. Master dyer Dede Styles will be using many natural flora found in the Western North Carolina region.

Beginning with the source, Anthony Cole will be up on the hill shearing sheep throughout the day. Julie Wilson will also be working with different animals, such as alpacas and rabbits, in studying various fiber structures. She also will be carding and spinning. Other members will be showcasing tapestry weaving, crochet, knitting, macrame, doll making, sewing, quilting, felting, tatting, rug hooking, embroidery, lace making and more.

To see these processes in finished pieces, be sure to attend the two fashion shows on Sunday hosted by weaver Liz Spear of Waynesville. Almost two decades in production, Spear has consistently elevated the works of members with ample commentary on design and technique. There will be work from 40 Guild members, showing a total of almost 100 different outfits.

Textile arts are known for building a sense of community, and to celebrate this, the Guild invites visitors to Fiber Weekend to bring their own handwork, whether it be crochet, embroidery or spinning. Weather permitting we would like to fill the hill behind the Folk Art Center auditorium with people engaged in fiber arts. Bring a blanket and enjoy a spring afternoon of craft.

The Southern Highland Craft Guild is a non-profit, educational organization established in 1930 to cultivate the crafts and makers of the Southern Highlands for the purpose of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation. The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior. The Folk Art Center is located at Milepost 382 of the Blue Ridge Parkway, just north of the Highway 70 entrance in east Asheville, NC.

JB Media Group is a digital marketing agency providing strategy, SEO, social media, content writing, advertising, and PR services. We help social enterprises, mission-driven companies, and nonprofits build a better world.

Echoview is an innovative fiber processing and manufacturing hub that’s  a catalyst for connecting community with commerce. We deliver products and services that fuel the American spirit of hard work and self-expression.

SPC Manufacturing Company is a contract, sewing/manufacturing company located in Eastern Tennessee that provides full service for custom products – specializing in bags, cases and containers – from design and development through prototyping, production, silk screening and packaging.

Fiber Weekend 2017, Demonstrating Makers:
Sandy Adair, tapestry weaving
Rita de Maintenon, heritage lace + crochet
Jim Gentry, macrame
Lin Oglesby, knitting + crochet
Amy Putansu, dyeing + weaving
Embroiderer’s Guild, embroidery
Charlie Patricolo, doll making
Lorraine Cathey, felting
Barbara Miller, weaving
Mary Nichols, spinning
Dede Styles, natural dyes
Connie Brown, quilting
Martine House, embroidery
Laura Gaskin, quilting + embroidery
Elizabeth Garlington, quilting
Carlson Tuttle, tatting
Tarheel Ruggers, rug hooking
The Mountain Lacers, lace making
Anthony Cole, sheep shearing

For further information contact Hannah Barry, Public Relations + Communications, Southern Highland Craft Guild, by e-mail at (hannah@craftguild.org) call 828/298-7928 x 309 or visit (www.craftguild.org).

Caldwell Arts Council is Calling for Artists in Caldwell County, NC, to Participate in Visual Artists Competition and Art Around Caldwell Studio Tour – Deadline May 27, 2017

May 10, 2017

The Caldwell Arts Council in Lenoir, NC, is pleased to announce the 41st Annual Caldwell Visual Artists Competition scheduled for June 2 – July 29, 2017. Sondra Dorn, a visual artist from Asheville NC, will judge the competition and cash prizes will be awarded.

This competition is open to 2-D (paintings, collage, etc.) and 3-D (pottery, small sculpture, etc.) visual artists 18 years of age or older who reside, work, attend school or take art classes in Caldwell County. Photography is excluded from this competition.

A non-refundable entry fee of $25 entitles each artist to display two works of art, to be delivered on either May 26th (9am-5pm) or May 27th (10am-2pm). Cash awards have been increased to include: Best in Show $350, 2nd Place $200, 3rd Place $150, People’s Choice $150, and up to three merit awards of $100 each.

Artists from Caldwell County and contiguous counties are also invited to open their home studios or set up in a local business in Caldwell County on Saturday, June 24th, 9am-4pm for the Art Around Ca;dwell Studio Tour. Artists participating in both events will receive recognition in the Caldwell Visual Artists Competition exhibit, and a discount on the entry fee for this studio tour.

All details on both events are available by calling the Caldwell Arts Council at 828/754-2486 or visiting the website at (www.caldwellarts.com).

The Caldwell Arts Council is located at 601 College Avenue, Lenoir, and open Tuesday-Friday 9am-5pm and Saturdays 10am-2pm.

The May 2017 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

May 1, 2017


The May 2017 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/517/517carolinaarts.html) – all 71 pages of it. That’s the same amount of pages as last month – that doesn’t happen that often.

Our cover art features work by Amy Goldstein-Rice of Inman, SC. She is part of the Southern Exposure group in the Upstate of SC. They will be having a show at the Upstate Gallery on Main in Spartanburg, SC. You can read about it on Page 18 of our May issue.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.

And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the June 2017 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the May 24th deadline.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

GreenHill in Greensboro, NC, Offer Open NC Art Review – July 29, 2017

April 27, 2017

15 NC artists are invited to present their work to GreenHill curator, Edie Carpenter, and other invited arts professionals through a five minute presentation with slide show at GreenHill in Greensboro, NC, Saturday, July 29, 2017, from 2-4pm. This call-for-artists is open to visual artists currently working in the state of NC, artists who have studied in a North Carolina degree program, taught professionally in NC, maintained ongoing professional relationships in NC, or who have previously resided in the state. All works must have been made within the last five years. Go to (www.greenhillnc.org/open-nc-art-review) to apply or for information.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our Marketing & Design Guru, Lauren Gordon, by e-mail at (lauren.gordon@greenhillnc.org).

Transylvania Community Arts Council in Brevard, NC, Call for Artists to Participate in the 45th Annual Fine Arts & Crafts Showcase on July 4, 2017

April 4, 2017

Artists who wish to exhibit in the 45th annual Fine Arts and Crafts Showcase on Main Street in downtown Brevard, NC, for July 4th may apply for a booth space through the Transylvania Community Arts Council until June 2, 2017. Applications and more information are available by calling the TC Arts Council at 828/884-2787 or by e-mailing to (tcarts@comporium.net). All art vendors must have their own tent, tables and chairs.

Each year, the Fine Arts and Crafts Showcase features up to 48 regional artists and crafters who are juried into the show based on their excellent original art and craftwork. The event will take place from 9am to 5pm, in conjunction with Heart of Brevard’s Fourth of July Celebration and Transylvania Region AACA Classic Car Show in downtown Brevard. These three-festivals-in-one attract up to 14,000 people annually with music, arts, crafts, food, children’s activities and more. This year the event will take place on Tuesday, July 4. Non-artist vendors wanting to participate must contact the Heart of Brevard at 828/884-3278.

The application and jury fee is $150. Applicants will be notified of jury decisions and receive important event information by June 5, 2017.

For more information, contact the Transylvania Community Arts Council at 828/884-2787 or e-mail to (tcarts@comporium.net).

The April 2017 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

March 31, 2017

The April 2017 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/417/417carolinaarts.html) – all 71 pages of it. We’re launching a little early as we have a day away from our computers on Apr. 1st – no fooling.

Our cover art features works by four different abstract artists who will have works on view in exhibits around the Carolinas. William Halsey’s estate is presenting his exhibit in Charleston, SC. We never miss an opportunity to promote his work and we’re also presenting work by one of his former students – Eileen Blyth.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.

And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the May 2017 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the Apr. 24th deadline.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

Henderson County Potters and Artisans Sponsor Empty Bowls Dinner in Flat Rock, NC – Apr. 30, 2017

March 30, 2017

On Apr. 30, 2017, potters and artisans of Henderson County, NC, will sponsor an Empty Bowls dinner benefiting the Backpack Program at St. John in the Wilderness in Flat Rock, NC. The event will be held from 5 to 7pm in the church Parish House, located at 1905 Greenville Highway in Flat Rock.

Area potters and school groups are making and donating pottery bowls for the event, and local restaurants and bakers are preparing and donating soups, breads, and desserts for the meal.

For the past eight school years on Friday mornings, volunteers have loaded about 200 backpacks with supplemental non-perishable food for children on the free- and reduced-lunch program so that they don’t go hungry on weekends. The program provides food for students attending a day care center (year-round program), two elementary schools, one middle school, and a parochial school.

Debby Staton, coordinator of the Backpack Program at St. John, said that food is provided by MANNA Food Bank weekly and then is supplemented from grants, donations, and fundraisers like Empty Bowl. “We make sure that each child has three dinners, two lunches, two breakfasts, and two snacks on a regular weekend.”

The Empty Bowls Project began in 1990 in a Michigan high school art class to raise funds for a food drive. Today it is an international grassroots effort to raise both money and awareness in the fight to end hunger, personalized by artists and arts organizations on a community level.

Tickets are $25 per person, which includes one handmade pottery bowl to take home, or $50 for families, which includes two pottery bowls. Limited tickets are available at the church Parish House.

Local potter David Voorhees is coordinating the event along with Staton. “One ticket will feed seven children for one weekend,” said Voorhees. “Come enjoy a simple meal, and choose a pottery bowl handcrafted by a local artisan to take home as a keepsake, knowing you are supporting children across Henderson County who are struggling with hunger every day.”

For more information, contact the Church Office at 828/693-9783 or David Voorhees at 828/698-8775.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Celebrates Traditional Arts Program for Students

March 30, 2017

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is celebrating the work of the ten budding potters who participated in the spring 2017 session of the Center’s Traditional Arts Program for Students (TAPS). TAPS is an afterschool pottery class hosted by the NC Pottery Center in partnership with Seagrove Elementary School and sponsored by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources. Each fall and spring, ten fifth grade students from nearby Seagrove Elementary School are invited to participate in the program, and learn pottery local history and skills.

Chad Brown with student

The TAPS program aims to connect North Carolina students with local traditional artists. Students receive instruction in an art form that has deep cultural roots in their community, taught by experts utilizing traditional techniques. Students learn numerous clay processes, including wheel-throwing, hand-building, glazing and firing of pottery forms drawn from traditional use and practice.  Seagrove potter Sid Luck, winner of the 2014 North Carolina Heritage Award, leads the class. Luck is assisted by Seagrove potters Chad Brown and Susan Greene, NCPC Artists-in-Residence Owen Laurion and Kirsten Olson, and NCPC educational program manager, Emily Lassiter.

“The North Carolina Pottery Center’s TAPS program is so fortunate to have fifth-generation potter Sid Luck teaching Seagrove pottery traditions to the community’s young people,” says Sally Peterson, Folklife Director at the NC Arts Council. “A career public school teacher himself, Sid combines high level teaching skills with time-honored pottery knowledge to present an enriching program that connects students to the very heart of their community. Rising fifth-generation potter Chad Brown and others contribute an energy and creativity to the program that would be difficult to match anywhere outside of a university program.  I love visiting the TAPS program, because the students are so enthusiastic and really perform way beyond expectation,” says Peterson.

The spring 2017 TAPS session will end Wednesday, Apr. 5, 2017.  To celebrate our students’ hard work, a reception and exhibition of TAPS students’ pottery is planned for that day, from 2:45 until 4pm in the education building. The general public is invited to attend.

For more information, please call 336/873.8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Kirsten Olsen for Clay Talks – Apr. 6, 2017

March 30, 2017

Join us at the on April 6th for a presentation by Kirsten Olson, currently an Artist-in-Residence at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, for Clay Talks.

A graduate of Juniata College in Huntington, PA with a BA in Anthropology, Minor Fine Arts and an MFA Ceramics from University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Olsen most recently served as Ceramics Adjunct Faculty and Ceramic Studio Technician at the Art Department of Juniata College. She has been an Artist-in-Residence at the Pottery Center since Oct. 2016. She was named one of American Craft Week’s 2016 “Rising Stars; 30 Exceptional Crafts People under the age of 30” and most recently announced as a finalist in “Functional Ceramics” for the 2017 NICHE Awards.

Olsen says, “My inspiration as a ceramic artist is strongly grounded in anthropology, particularly cultural customs, ceremonies, and rituals. My ceramic vessels not only contain the food and drink that nourish, but also contain the ideas of culture and community.” Highly inspired by Alaskan culture and the North, her work recalls the shapes of baskets, hats, mukluk patterns, and ivory objects while the glaze and kiln firing process also reflect textures associated with natural materials, such as bone, ivory, and wood.

Olsen’s talk will address her background in clay and anthropology, as well as recent endeavors at the Pottery Center. A potluck at 6pm will begin the evening’s events, followed by the slide talk at 7pm. Come out for a great night of food and community!

Location: The NCPC Educational Building located behind the NC Pottery Center at 233 East Avenue, Seagrove, 27341.

This presentation is free and open to the public.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation, and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you! The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

For more information, call the center at 336/873-8430. This ongoing lecture series is facilitated by Emily Lassiter, NCPC Educational Program Manager.

GreenHill in Greensboro, NC, Receives $21,500 from Lincoln Financial Foundation

March 30, 2017

GreenHill in Greensboro, NC, has been awarded $21,500 from Lincoln Financial Foundation. With this support, GreenHill will continue to offer free Group Visits for underserved children, workshops for parents and caregivers and expand our curriculum to better accommodate special needs children and adults.

Since 2011, GreenHill has served 18,000 individuals through the support of Lincoln Financial Foundation. Research shows that sustained participation in the arts is of significant benefit to learners. A seminal longitudinal study examining the importance of sustained arts in the development of children demonstrated that intensive involvement in the arts was associated with higher levels of achievement, college attainment, and prosocial behavior.

The free Group Visits will serve programs affiliated with Guilford Child Development, United Way of Greater Greensboro’s Thriving at Three sites, Parents as Teachers, Title I schools, the Greensboro Area Autism Society of North Carolina and other organizations working with underserved populations. Through a two part tour, participants visit The Gallery to view the most current exhibition and create art in the ArtQuest Studios. During Group Visits learning outcomes target visual literacy by teaching strategies for looking at and discussing works of art, strengthening fine motor skills, fostering social and emotional development and strengthening higher level cognitive skills such as critical thinking. In order to solicit parental involvement, GreenHill will facilitate parent workshops for those organizations that work directly with parents. These workshops will blend an art curriculum with the “Raising a Reader” curriculum and will be delivered at the organization’s site. New this year, GreenHill will add curriculum to accommodate children and adults with autism spectrum disorders.

Jaymie Meyer, GreenHill’s Director, Youth and Education Programs explains a new component to the program, “The main thing that is different this year is that we are partnering with groups focused on the autistic that will help us develop the curriculum designed for them. We already have these groups coming to us, but we’ve never developed something that is exactly for this population. I know there are things we need to focus on more with this population, and the specialized staff has specific ways of working with them that I would never know. For instance, many of the clients are not verbal, so the ways to communicate with them may be gestural, or through demonstrating and signaling for them. Another great thing about this program is that many of these people have been coming here for a while. When they first came to GreenHill there was a lot of trepidation, now when they come in, I see the clients rushing through the door knowing exactly where they want to go. This is so important – they are able to build confidence and have structure.”

“Most of our participants are also visiting a gallery or art studio for the first time where they are learning new art vocabulary and experimenting with new art materials. The time spent in The Gallery is designed to promote aesthetic awareness and to help participants connect the work to their own experiences,” explains Laura Way, GreenHill’s Executive Director.

GreenHill’s fall 2017 exhibition, “Two Artists, One Space”, is a perfect example of how works of art can elicit greater understanding of culture and ideas. The exhibition will feature an African American artist creating work investigating the black experience in the South, and a Peruvian American artist whose work explores the immigrant experience. “Our goal during this exhibition will be for viewers to develop a greater appreciation of how culture informs art and how their own experiences can inform the work they create,” says Way.

During the art making leg of the tour, GreenHill’s education staff guides participants through their own unique art making experience in GreenHill’s studio-based learning environment. Laura Maruzzella, GreenHill’s Art Educator + Volunteer Coordinator regularly leads the Group Visits, “We have guided art making activities that relate to the exhibition, but we also have open-ended art making activities. I think both are important for our participants in different ways. Our guided activities connect what they have heard and seen in The Gallery and reiterates language that they’ve learned. On the flip side, we have opportunities for them to do self-guided art making which is pretty unique because a lot of arts programs in schools just simply don’t allow time for that. Here children get to create on their own without being limited by instruction. When children are afforded the opportunity to create independently they tap into critical problem solving skills and avenues for self-expression that they would not otherwise discover about themselves, not to mention confidence and independence. Plus it’s fun.”

Lifelong learning through the visual arts has been at the forefront of GreenHill’s mission since its inception in 1974. Children who live at or below the poverty level have limited access to activities outside of the school setting, especially in the arts. The Education Equality Index in March 2016 reported the achievement gap between low-income children and their “more advantaged” peers is growing at a faster rate in North Carolina than in any other state in the nation, with Greensboro and Winston-Salem having larger gaps than more than 70% of major United States cities. The achievement gap, some have argued is not just a problem within the confines of formal education, but is also caused by a dearth of opportunity for low income students. Data suggests that outside experiences are just as meaningful as test scores when it comes to a child’s success later in life.

GreenHill is located at 200 North Davie Street, in the Greensboro Cultural Center.  GreenHill is the center for NC art and promotes the visual arts of North Carolina by engaging a broad community of artists, adults and children through dynamic exhibitions and educational programs while providing a platform for exploration and investment in art.

For more information visit (www.GreenHillnc.org).