Posts Tagged ‘Visiting North Carolina’

Transylvania Community Arts Council in Brevard, NC, Call for Artists to Participate in the 45th Annual Fine Arts & Crafts Showcase on July 4, 2017

April 4, 2017

Artists who wish to exhibit in the 45th annual Fine Arts and Crafts Showcase on Main Street in downtown Brevard, NC, for July 4th may apply for a booth space through the Transylvania Community Arts Council until June 2, 2017. Applications and more information are available by calling the TC Arts Council at 828/884-2787 or by e-mailing to (tcarts@comporium.net). All art vendors must have their own tent, tables and chairs.

Each year, the Fine Arts and Crafts Showcase features up to 48 regional artists and crafters who are juried into the show based on their excellent original art and craftwork. The event will take place from 9am to 5pm, in conjunction with Heart of Brevard’s Fourth of July Celebration and Transylvania Region AACA Classic Car Show in downtown Brevard. These three-festivals-in-one attract up to 14,000 people annually with music, arts, crafts, food, children’s activities and more. This year the event will take place on Tuesday, July 4. Non-artist vendors wanting to participate must contact the Heart of Brevard at 828/884-3278.

The application and jury fee is $150. Applicants will be notified of jury decisions and receive important event information by June 5, 2017.

For more information, contact the Transylvania Community Arts Council at 828/884-2787 or e-mail to (tcarts@comporium.net).

The April 2017 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

March 31, 2017

The April 2017 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/417/417carolinaarts.html) – all 71 pages of it. We’re launching a little early as we have a day away from our computers on Apr. 1st – no fooling.

Our cover art features works by four different abstract artists who will have works on view in exhibits around the Carolinas. William Halsey’s estate is presenting his exhibit in Charleston, SC. We never miss an opportunity to promote his work and we’re also presenting work by one of his former students – Eileen Blyth.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.

And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the May 2017 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the Apr. 24th deadline.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

Henderson County Potters and Artisans Sponsor Empty Bowls Dinner in Flat Rock, NC – Apr. 30, 2017

March 30, 2017

On Apr. 30, 2017, potters and artisans of Henderson County, NC, will sponsor an Empty Bowls dinner benefiting the Backpack Program at St. John in the Wilderness in Flat Rock, NC. The event will be held from 5 to 7pm in the church Parish House, located at 1905 Greenville Highway in Flat Rock.

Area potters and school groups are making and donating pottery bowls for the event, and local restaurants and bakers are preparing and donating soups, breads, and desserts for the meal.

For the past eight school years on Friday mornings, volunteers have loaded about 200 backpacks with supplemental non-perishable food for children on the free- and reduced-lunch program so that they don’t go hungry on weekends. The program provides food for students attending a day care center (year-round program), two elementary schools, one middle school, and a parochial school.

Debby Staton, coordinator of the Backpack Program at St. John, said that food is provided by MANNA Food Bank weekly and then is supplemented from grants, donations, and fundraisers like Empty Bowl. “We make sure that each child has three dinners, two lunches, two breakfasts, and two snacks on a regular weekend.”

The Empty Bowls Project began in 1990 in a Michigan high school art class to raise funds for a food drive. Today it is an international grassroots effort to raise both money and awareness in the fight to end hunger, personalized by artists and arts organizations on a community level.

Tickets are $25 per person, which includes one handmade pottery bowl to take home, or $50 for families, which includes two pottery bowls. Limited tickets are available at the church Parish House.

Local potter David Voorhees is coordinating the event along with Staton. “One ticket will feed seven children for one weekend,” said Voorhees. “Come enjoy a simple meal, and choose a pottery bowl handcrafted by a local artisan to take home as a keepsake, knowing you are supporting children across Henderson County who are struggling with hunger every day.”

For more information, contact the Church Office at 828/693-9783 or David Voorhees at 828/698-8775.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Celebrates Traditional Arts Program for Students

March 30, 2017

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is celebrating the work of the ten budding potters who participated in the spring 2017 session of the Center’s Traditional Arts Program for Students (TAPS). TAPS is an afterschool pottery class hosted by the NC Pottery Center in partnership with Seagrove Elementary School and sponsored by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources. Each fall and spring, ten fifth grade students from nearby Seagrove Elementary School are invited to participate in the program, and learn pottery local history and skills.

Chad Brown with student

The TAPS program aims to connect North Carolina students with local traditional artists. Students receive instruction in an art form that has deep cultural roots in their community, taught by experts utilizing traditional techniques. Students learn numerous clay processes, including wheel-throwing, hand-building, glazing and firing of pottery forms drawn from traditional use and practice.  Seagrove potter Sid Luck, winner of the 2014 North Carolina Heritage Award, leads the class. Luck is assisted by Seagrove potters Chad Brown and Susan Greene, NCPC Artists-in-Residence Owen Laurion and Kirsten Olson, and NCPC educational program manager, Emily Lassiter.

“The North Carolina Pottery Center’s TAPS program is so fortunate to have fifth-generation potter Sid Luck teaching Seagrove pottery traditions to the community’s young people,” says Sally Peterson, Folklife Director at the NC Arts Council. “A career public school teacher himself, Sid combines high level teaching skills with time-honored pottery knowledge to present an enriching program that connects students to the very heart of their community. Rising fifth-generation potter Chad Brown and others contribute an energy and creativity to the program that would be difficult to match anywhere outside of a university program.  I love visiting the TAPS program, because the students are so enthusiastic and really perform way beyond expectation,” says Peterson.

The spring 2017 TAPS session will end Wednesday, Apr. 5, 2017.  To celebrate our students’ hard work, a reception and exhibition of TAPS students’ pottery is planned for that day, from 2:45 until 4pm in the education building. The general public is invited to attend.

For more information, please call 336/873.8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Kirsten Olsen for Clay Talks – Apr. 6, 2017

March 30, 2017

Join us at the on April 6th for a presentation by Kirsten Olson, currently an Artist-in-Residence at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, for Clay Talks.

A graduate of Juniata College in Huntington, PA with a BA in Anthropology, Minor Fine Arts and an MFA Ceramics from University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Olsen most recently served as Ceramics Adjunct Faculty and Ceramic Studio Technician at the Art Department of Juniata College. She has been an Artist-in-Residence at the Pottery Center since Oct. 2016. She was named one of American Craft Week’s 2016 “Rising Stars; 30 Exceptional Crafts People under the age of 30” and most recently announced as a finalist in “Functional Ceramics” for the 2017 NICHE Awards.

Olsen says, “My inspiration as a ceramic artist is strongly grounded in anthropology, particularly cultural customs, ceremonies, and rituals. My ceramic vessels not only contain the food and drink that nourish, but also contain the ideas of culture and community.” Highly inspired by Alaskan culture and the North, her work recalls the shapes of baskets, hats, mukluk patterns, and ivory objects while the glaze and kiln firing process also reflect textures associated with natural materials, such as bone, ivory, and wood.

Olsen’s talk will address her background in clay and anthropology, as well as recent endeavors at the Pottery Center. A potluck at 6pm will begin the evening’s events, followed by the slide talk at 7pm. Come out for a great night of food and community!

Location: The NCPC Educational Building located behind the NC Pottery Center at 233 East Avenue, Seagrove, 27341.

This presentation is free and open to the public.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation, and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you! The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

For more information, call the center at 336/873-8430. This ongoing lecture series is facilitated by Emily Lassiter, NCPC Educational Program Manager.

GreenHill in Greensboro, NC, Receives $21,500 from Lincoln Financial Foundation

March 30, 2017

GreenHill in Greensboro, NC, has been awarded $21,500 from Lincoln Financial Foundation. With this support, GreenHill will continue to offer free Group Visits for underserved children, workshops for parents and caregivers and expand our curriculum to better accommodate special needs children and adults.

Since 2011, GreenHill has served 18,000 individuals through the support of Lincoln Financial Foundation. Research shows that sustained participation in the arts is of significant benefit to learners. A seminal longitudinal study examining the importance of sustained arts in the development of children demonstrated that intensive involvement in the arts was associated with higher levels of achievement, college attainment, and prosocial behavior.

The free Group Visits will serve programs affiliated with Guilford Child Development, United Way of Greater Greensboro’s Thriving at Three sites, Parents as Teachers, Title I schools, the Greensboro Area Autism Society of North Carolina and other organizations working with underserved populations. Through a two part tour, participants visit The Gallery to view the most current exhibition and create art in the ArtQuest Studios. During Group Visits learning outcomes target visual literacy by teaching strategies for looking at and discussing works of art, strengthening fine motor skills, fostering social and emotional development and strengthening higher level cognitive skills such as critical thinking. In order to solicit parental involvement, GreenHill will facilitate parent workshops for those organizations that work directly with parents. These workshops will blend an art curriculum with the “Raising a Reader” curriculum and will be delivered at the organization’s site. New this year, GreenHill will add curriculum to accommodate children and adults with autism spectrum disorders.

Jaymie Meyer, GreenHill’s Director, Youth and Education Programs explains a new component to the program, “The main thing that is different this year is that we are partnering with groups focused on the autistic that will help us develop the curriculum designed for them. We already have these groups coming to us, but we’ve never developed something that is exactly for this population. I know there are things we need to focus on more with this population, and the specialized staff has specific ways of working with them that I would never know. For instance, many of the clients are not verbal, so the ways to communicate with them may be gestural, or through demonstrating and signaling for them. Another great thing about this program is that many of these people have been coming here for a while. When they first came to GreenHill there was a lot of trepidation, now when they come in, I see the clients rushing through the door knowing exactly where they want to go. This is so important – they are able to build confidence and have structure.”

“Most of our participants are also visiting a gallery or art studio for the first time where they are learning new art vocabulary and experimenting with new art materials. The time spent in The Gallery is designed to promote aesthetic awareness and to help participants connect the work to their own experiences,” explains Laura Way, GreenHill’s Executive Director.

GreenHill’s fall 2017 exhibition, “Two Artists, One Space”, is a perfect example of how works of art can elicit greater understanding of culture and ideas. The exhibition will feature an African American artist creating work investigating the black experience in the South, and a Peruvian American artist whose work explores the immigrant experience. “Our goal during this exhibition will be for viewers to develop a greater appreciation of how culture informs art and how their own experiences can inform the work they create,” says Way.

During the art making leg of the tour, GreenHill’s education staff guides participants through their own unique art making experience in GreenHill’s studio-based learning environment. Laura Maruzzella, GreenHill’s Art Educator + Volunteer Coordinator regularly leads the Group Visits, “We have guided art making activities that relate to the exhibition, but we also have open-ended art making activities. I think both are important for our participants in different ways. Our guided activities connect what they have heard and seen in The Gallery and reiterates language that they’ve learned. On the flip side, we have opportunities for them to do self-guided art making which is pretty unique because a lot of arts programs in schools just simply don’t allow time for that. Here children get to create on their own without being limited by instruction. When children are afforded the opportunity to create independently they tap into critical problem solving skills and avenues for self-expression that they would not otherwise discover about themselves, not to mention confidence and independence. Plus it’s fun.”

Lifelong learning through the visual arts has been at the forefront of GreenHill’s mission since its inception in 1974. Children who live at or below the poverty level have limited access to activities outside of the school setting, especially in the arts. The Education Equality Index in March 2016 reported the achievement gap between low-income children and their “more advantaged” peers is growing at a faster rate in North Carolina than in any other state in the nation, with Greensboro and Winston-Salem having larger gaps than more than 70% of major United States cities. The achievement gap, some have argued is not just a problem within the confines of formal education, but is also caused by a dearth of opportunity for low income students. Data suggests that outside experiences are just as meaningful as test scores when it comes to a child’s success later in life.

GreenHill is located at 200 North Davie Street, in the Greensboro Cultural Center.  GreenHill is the center for NC art and promotes the visual arts of North Carolina by engaging a broad community of artists, adults and children through dynamic exhibitions and educational programs while providing a platform for exploration and investment in art.

For more information visit (www.GreenHillnc.org).

Arts Council of Henderson County in Hendersonville, NC, Announces ArtScape Banners Opening Reception – Apr. 7, 2017

March 30, 2017

The ArtScape Hendersonville Banners committee invites the public to celebrate the ArtScape banners recently installed in downtown Hendersonville, NC, at an art reception in two locations:  Art Mob Studios & Marketplace, 124 4th Avenue East, and at Art On 4th Gallery & Studio at 125 4th Avenue West, in Hendersonville, on Friday, Apr. 7, from 5 -7:30pm. The two galleries are hosting the receptions with the artists, and the sponsors of the banners, in attendance.

The art reception and sale celebrates the first annual ArtScape Hendersonville banners. Artwork selected as a result of a jury process has been reproduced on 40 banners that will hang from lamp posts on Hendersonville’s Main Street, Seventh Avenue, and side streets for a year beginning in March 2017. In providing a unique twist on an outdoor gallery experience, the project’s objective is to create an outdoor gallery experience making Hendersonville an exciting and unique art destination.

The 40 artists will be at the opening reception, and are offering the artwork depicted on the banners for sale to the public. Live music, appetizers, and drinks will be provided at both locations.

Led by Hendersonville artist, Costanza Knight, the ArtScape Hendersonville Banners Committee formed as a result of a collaboration between the Art League of Henderson County, the Arts Council of Henderson County, and Downtown Hendersonville, Inc. ArtScape Banners Hendersonville received funding from the Community Foundation of Henderson County.

The Arts Council of Henderson County is a community organization that promotes, advocates for and nurtures the arts in Henderson County and Western North Carolina. Its office is located at 401 North Main St., Ste. 302, Hendersonville, NC 28792. (Entrance on Fourth Avenue West.)

The Arts Council is supported in part by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources; funds administered by the Community Foundation of Henderson County, Henderson County, Henderson County Tourism Development Authority, and the City of Hendersonville.

For more information please contact the Arts Council by e-mail at (acofhc@bellsouth.net) or call 828/693-8504. The web address is (www.acofhc.org).

FRANK Gallery in Chapel Hill, NC, Launches Apprentice Program for Emerging Artists

March 30, 2017

The Franklin Street Arts Collective (FRANK Gallery) in Chapel Hill, NC, will begin accepting applications for a one-year emerging artist apprentice program on April 1, 2017. The program will provide the selected artist(s) with opportunities for professional development, exposure, sale of artwork, and collaboration with the gallery, its members and local arts organizations.

“The apprentice program allows FRANK to give promising young artists an opportunity to learn the business of art through a truly hands-on experience, and from within a creative and supportive community,” said Torey Mishoe, Gallery Manager.

The program seeks to foster mutual growth between the apprentice, and the gallery artists. The apprentice’s participation in the collective offers the benefits of a FRANK membership, including exhibition opportunities in the gallery, mentorship from professional artists, and unrivaled access to the professional arts community in Chapel Hill and the Triangle. As an apprentice artist, the selected artist(s) will be expected to fulfill the duties of a member artist which include working in the gallery and serving on gallery committees, hosting artist talks, demonstrations, and/or workshops, and assisting in developing a community outreach exhibit.

Artists will be selected primarily on the strength of their artwork; apprenticeship will last for one year. Applicants must be 35 years of age or younger. Individuals from groups underrepresented in visual arts organizations are encouraged to apply. All qualified applicants will receive consideration without regard to race, color, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, or national origin.

Applications will be accepted from April 1 – 30, 2017 online at (www.frankisart.com/emerging). We will not accept mailed or e-mailed applications. Questions can be directed to (info@frankisart.com). Candidates will be notified by May 15, 2017. The residency will run from Aug. 2017 to July 2018.

FRANK Gallery is the art heartbeat of Downtown Chapel Hill – offering access to contemporary art by established local artists and a welcoming place for art lovers to gather on historic Franklin Street. Featuring work from more than 70 artists, FRANK is a 501(c)(3) non-profit collective, founded by the area’s finest artists working together to open the door for creative innovation in the arts.

The Mission of the Franklin Street Arts Collective is to support the local arts community and promote a vibrant downtown Chapel Hill through exhibits, events, programs, and educational outreach through FRANK Gallery.

Tyler White O’Brien Art Gallery in Greensboro, NC, Offers 5th Crayons Matter Benefit – Apr. 22, 2017

March 30, 2017

We are thrilled to be hosting our 5th Crayons Matter Benefit Event! It will be held on Saturday, Apr. 22, 2017 at Tyler White O’Brien Art Gallery, 307 State Street from 6-9pm in Greensboro, NC.

We again plan to have a silent crayons art auction donated by esteemed artists.  It was a huge success these past 4 years.

We are asking for each artist to donate one piece of crayon inspired work on paper 10.5×8 or 11×14. All work can be made with crayons. Some artists used their imaginations and created some awesome crayon inspired pieces with melted crayons, pastel, charcoal.

“In 2011, Brad and I had the extraordinary opportunity to travel to Africa where we discovered the importance of educating children globally through creative thinking,” says Courtenay Fields. “After teaching children in the Volta Region of Ghana and then traveling with Brad to Tanzania to see first-hand the importance of supplying children with basic school supplies like crayons and paper, this incredible experience motivated us to seek out partnerships with schools in Ghana with the goal of delivering essential school supplies to children in need.”

Courtenay & Brad’s Hope: Through Crayons Matter, our hope is that we can educate children by inspiring and stimulating their strong imaginations through crayons and basic school supplies. No child should go without a pack of crayons that they can call their own. We will continue to collect inspiring pieces art for each backpack from the children at our local schools.  As you can see in the pictures from our recent delivery to Africa, the children were delighted to receive unique artwork from children.

For further info contact Kathy O’Brien by e-mail at (kathylovesart@aol.com) or visit (http://crayonsmatter.org/).

Robeson County History Museum in Lumberton, NC, Calls for Quilts for an Upcoming Exhibit

March 30, 2017

The Robeson County History Museum is located at 101 South Elm Street in Downtown Lumberton, NC, near the Robeson County Public Library. Their website is (www.robesoncountyhistorymuseum.com).

We are putting together an exhibit of quilts that will run to or thru June 2017. We have several in our collections along with a number of quilt patterns that were part of the “Stitch In Time” exhibit in early 2000. If you have your grandma’s quilt that you would be willing to LOAN the Museum for this exhibit, please call/e-mail myself (Shep Oliver) and I will make arrangements and exchange the necessary paperwork. If you know of someone with an interesting quilt and story to go with it please inform them of this opportunity!

Thank you all for your help and interest in our Museum!

For further info contact Shep Oliver, Cell 910/228-0096, Farm 910/628-7276, or e-mail to (shepoliver@yahoo.com).