Archive for the ‘Raleigh NC Visual Art’ Category

North Carolina Museum of Art Director Lawrence J. Wheeler Announces Retirement

November 27, 2017

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s director, Lawrence J. Wheeler, has announced his plans to retire in November 2018. In his 23 years at the helm of the NCMA thus far, Wheeler has led the Museum, in Raleigh, NC, to new heights, shaping it into a top-tier art destination and, above all, a welcoming community space for a growing city and state. Wheeler will continue as director until a new director is appointed.

Wheeler was named director of the Museum in October 1994, having served as assistant director at the Cleveland Museum of Art and, before that, as deputy secretary at the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources in Raleigh. During his tenure the NCMA has become one of the leading art museums in America, attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors each year to the Museum galleries, special exhibitions, and Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park.

“North Carolinians of all walks of life have access to one of the most renowned art museums in the country thanks to Larry Wheeler’s visionary leadership,” Governor Roy Cooper said. “From overseeing construction of the original Museum building, to its ambitious expansion in 2010, to the creation of the new Museum Park, Larry has been the North Carolina Museum of Art’s guiding light. North Carolina is better for his service, and Kristin and I wish him all the best in his well-earned retirement.”

In 2006, under Wheeler’s leadership, the Museum unveiled its design for an ambitious expansion. His vision for a spacious, light-filled structure to house the Museum’s permanent collection became a reality in April 2010 with the opening of West Building. Today the American Institute of Architects award–winning space, surrounded by sculpture gardens and reflecting pools, presents works drawn from the NCMA’s outstanding permanent collection, spanning 5,000 years from ancient Egypt to the present day.

Wheeler also oversaw the innovative redesign and transformation of the Museum Park, which is among the largest museum parks in the world. The Park redefines the traditional museum experience as the site of outdoor art installations, community gathering spaces for social interactions, contemplative gardens, and the Joseph M. Bryan, Jr., Theater in the Museum Park, home to a celebrated outdoor performing arts series. “Ultimately, his complete trust in the vision and creative journey shaped the NCMA campus into the community gathering space it is today,” said Dan Gottlieb, director of planning, design, and the Museum Park, who worked closely with Wheeler throughout his entire tenure, and on the West Building and Park projects.

Wheeler worked passionately to develop the Museum’s collection, including securing a gift of 29 Auguste Rodin sculptures from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation in 2009, making the NCMA the largest repository of Rodin’s work in the American South. The large gift followed the tremendous success of the NCMA’s 1999 Rodin exhibition, which drew over 300,000 in attendance. “All Larry asked was to make the Rodin exhibition, which included 60-plus works from the Cantor Foundation, the best Rodin exhibition ever,” said David Steel, curator of European art. “Larry is never satisfied with ‘adequate’ or ‘good.’ What he demands is ‘superlative,’ ‘the best,’ and ‘more.’”

Wheeler strengthened the NCMA’s modern and contemporary collections, including overseeing a gift of works by masters of mid- to late-20th-century American art—Milton Avery, Richard Diebenkorn, Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Hans Hofmann, Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Motherwell, David Park, Sean Scully, Frank Stella, and many others—from the private collection of Jim and Mary Patton.

Wheeler’s awards include his 2017 induction into the Raleigh Hall of Fame, the Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters from the Republic of France, the Medal of Arts from the city of Raleigh, the Leadership Award from the Triangle Business Journal, the Design Guild Award from the North Carolina State University College of Design, and the Thad Eure Memorial Award from the Greater Raleigh Convention and Visitors Bureau. In 2000 he was named Tar Heel of the Year by the Raleigh News & Observer, which called him “the godfather of the Triangle’s cultural boom” and cited his skill at melding “arts, politics, and commerce into a powerful new cultural force.” In November 2010 Wheeler received the inaugural Mary D. B. T. Semans Award for Distinguished Service to the Arts from Duke University’s Nasher Museum of Art.

Wheeler grew up in Lakeland, Florida. He holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in history and French from Pfeiffer College and a Master of Arts and Ph.D. in European history from the University of Georgia. He has received honorary degrees from North Carolina State University and Pfeiffer University.

Details about events surrounding his retirement, including celebrations of Wheeler’s legacy and an installation on the Museum’s history during his directorship, are forthcoming.

For further information call the Museum at 919/839-6262 or visit (www.ncartmuseum.org).

Advertisements

Monster Drawing Rally Returns to the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, NC, Aug. 25, 2017

July 30, 2017

The second annual Monster Drawing Rally, featuring more than 70 artists at all stages of their careers taking shifts to draw for an hour in front of a live audience. As spectators spy on the creative process, sketches morph into full-fledged works of art. Finished drawings are immediately available for $50 each. DJ Forge will be spinning beats, and a variety of food trucks will be on hand. The evening also includes a collaborative art project sponsored by Flight Fund.


View from past event

Monster Drawing Rally makes art more accessible as a way to view new talent, interact with North Carolina’s artistic community, and support NCMA programming. Inspired by the San Francisco artist-centered nonprofit Southern Exposure, whose mission is to show support to local artists, we’ve adopted this fund-raising idea to bring North Carolina artists to the Museum for a night of creating, mingling, drinking, and fun.

Artists include Ben Shafer, Miriam Zimil, Drew Hill, Greg Baldwin, Kiki Farish, Maya Freelon Asante, Rio Aubry Taylor, Sean Kernick, Marx Myth, Bart Cusick, and more.

Food trucks include The Parlour, Stuft, Flirting with Fire, Bulkogi, and Soomsoom Pita Pockets.

The event takes place in the East Building at the North Carolina Museum of Art, 2110 Blue Ridge Road in Raleigh, NC, Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, from 5:30 to 9pm.

Tickets: $5 for members, $10 for nonmembers, free for children under 6 with ticket. Purchase online or through the Box Office at 919/715-5923

The NCMA hosts a special related event, ArtCast Live Podcast, on Thursday, August 3, featuring artists from the Monster Drawing Rally and local podcasters Jen Dasal, NCMA associate curator of contemporary art (ArtCurious) and Jeff Bell, host (Don’t You Lie to Me). The event is free with ticket. The ArtCast Live event is also the debut of the Art-o-Mat art vending machine. For $5, attendees can get a unique piece of art, dispensed through a one-of-a-kind vintage vending machine. Learn about the podcast hosts and artists on the Museum site.

For further info visit (http://ncartmuseum.org).

North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, NC, Installs Two Sculptures by Mark di Suvero in Museum Park

December 23, 2016

nc-museum-of-art-logo

The North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA), in Raleigh, NC, has installed two large-scale steel sculptures by New York–based artist Mark di Suvero in its Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park. The sculptures, 26-foot-tall Ulalu and 32-foot-tall No Fuss, are on long-term loan to the Museum.

“We’re thrilled to install not one but two of Mark di Suvero’s striking, vibrant, and imaginative sculptures at the NCMA,” says Linda Dougherty, the Museum’s chief curator and curator of contemporary art. “These sculptures—appearing to defy gravity with a tremendous sense of dynamism, energy, and movement—will be a perfect addition to the Park, engaging with both the landscape and our visitors.”

1216nc-museum-oa-mark-di-suvero2
Mark di Suvero, “Ulalu”, 2001, stainless steel, painted steel, 26′ 7″ h x 30′ w x 15′ d, © 2016 Mark di Suvero. Photo courtesy of the North Carolina Museum of Art

1216nc-museum-oa-mark-di-suvero4
Mark di Suvero, “No Fuss”, 2003-2008, steel, 32 x 50 x 30 ft, © 2016 Mark di Suvero. Photo courtesy of the North Carolina Museum of Art

Internationally renowned for the monumental steel sculptures he has created for over five decades, Di Suvero employs the industrial tools of cutting and welding torches and cranes to create massive, architectural works out of steel I-beams. The improbable angles and sharp lines of his constructions, like giant 3-D drawings, activate the landscapes they are placed in with enormous, forceful, sweeping gestures.  Playing with balance and suspension, some works, like No Fuss, have movable parts that swing and rotate.

“The enormous, bold sculptures will energize the Museum Park in a whole new way—drawing visitors into the new gardens and rolling meadow, welcoming passersby from the street front, and adding a new element of color and geometric line that will contrast beautifully with the natural landscape,” says Dan Gottlieb, the NCMA’s director of planning, design, and the Museum Park. “Placing Ulala at Blue Ridge Road and No Fuss in the meadow will help unify the campus and visually signify to visitors that they are at the NCMA.”

The dynamic geometry, powerful size, and expansive scale of his work are the result of his creative process. “I don’t build small models or draw detailed plans first,” says Mark di Suvero. “I start with a vision, a dream of what I want to do, and see where it goes.”

Di Suvero lives and works in New York, NY.

The two installations are made possible by the NCMA’s Art in the Environment Fund, which was established to support temporary, permanent, and loaned installations of public art in the NCMA Park and community. It is dedicated to the investment in significant and engaging public art and to providing accessible and meaningful experiences with art and nature for the people of North Carolina.

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years, from ancient Egypt to the present, making the institution one of the premier art museums in the South. The Museum’s collection provides educational, aesthetic, intellectual, and cultural experiences for the citizens of North Carolina and beyond. The 164-acre Museum Park showcases the connection between art and nature through site-specific works of environmental art. The Museum offers changing national touring exhibitions, classes, lectures, family activities, films, and concerts.

The Museum opened West Building, home to the permanent collection, in 2010. The North Carolina Museum of Art, Lawrence J. Wheeler, director, is located at 2110 Blue Ridge Road in Raleigh. It is the art museum of the State of North Carolina, Pat McCrory, governor, and an agency of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, Susan Kluttz, secretary.

Raleigh Fine Arts Society in Raleigh, NC, Calls for Entries of Its “39th Annual NC Artists Exhibition” – Deadline Jan. 9, 2017

November 11, 2016

raleigh-fine-arts-society-logo

The “39th Annual North Carolina Artists Exhibition” is an annual juried exhibit for two-dimensional and three-dimensional visual art featuring established and emerging artists from across North Carolina. It  is the largest all media, juried artists exhibition in the state. Prizes totaling $6,000 are awarded. All North Carolina residents ages 18 and over are eligible.

Deadline for entry is Jan. 9, 2017.

The Juror for this year’s exhibition is Michael Rooks the Wieland Family Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the High Museum in Atlanta, GA. He has served as juror for numerous exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad. The High Museum is one of the leading art museums in the Southeastern United States, with more than 15,000 works of art in its permanent collection and dedicated to supporting and collecting works by Southern artists.

The Raleigh Fine Arts Society mission is to encourage the pursuit of art, music and the written word. Since the 1970s The Raleigh Fine Arts Society (RFAS)  has been involved in a variety of projects in support of arts in the community. The “North Carolina Artists Exhibition” is one of three signature arts projects executed by RFAS annually. The Literary Contest is a short story writing contest for Wake County high school students in grades 10, 11 and 12. The Choral Celebration offers choral groups in grades 4 and 5 in Wake County Schools a chance to share their music as well as enjoy the successes of other elementary school choruses performing in Meymandi Concert Hall at the Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts.

Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts: Exhibition Opening Reception and Juror’s Lecture Mar. 12, 2017  4pm Meymandi Hall. Exhibition Dates: Mar. 12 – Apr. 27, 2017 at Betty Ray McCain Gallery

For further information e-mail Susan Garrity at (artistsexhibition@gmail.com).

North Carolina Museum of Art’s Stacey Kirby in Raleigh, NC, Awarded 2016 ArtPrize Juried Grand Prize

October 17, 2016

nc-museum-of-art-logo

The North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA), in Raleigh, NC, announces that NCMA conservation assistant Stacey Kirby has been awarded the Juried Grand Prize at the eighth annual international art competition ArtPrize. A jury of art experts selected Kirby’s work, “The Bureau of Personal Belonging,” as the winner out of 1,453 submissions. As one of two Grand Prize winners—one juried and one selected by popular vote—Kirby was awarded $200,000.

1016big-nc-museum-of-art-artprize
Pictured left to right: Heather Gordon, Warren Hicks, Stacey Kirby, Harriet Hoover. Photo by Alex Maness.

“ArtPrize was an expansive journey for me as an artist,” says Stacey Kirby. “The vision that I had for the work came to fruition as a result of the hard work of fellow North Carolina artists, the Grand Rapids, MI, community members, and ArtPrize’s incredible staff. I am honored and delighted to represent North Carolina’s thriving arts community through this award.”

ArtPrize, an international art competition decided equally by public vote and expert jury, is held annually in Grand Rapids, MI. It has been named the most attended public art event in the world for two consecutive years by “The Art Newspaper”—average daily attendance at the 19-day event is on par with that of the Louvre in Paris and surpasses that of the British Museum in London and the Met in New York. This year’s ArtPrize began Sept. 21, and the award ceremony was held Oct. 7, 2016.

Kirby’s interactive, performative installation, “The Bureau of Personal Belonging,” was selected as the Grand Prize winner by jurors Michelle Grabner, artist and professor at School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Paul Ha, director at the MIT List Visual Arts Center; and Eric Shiner, senior vice president at Sotheby’s. The second Grand Prize, based on smartphone-enabled popular vote, was awarded to James Mellick for his work “Wounded Warrior Dogs”.

“The Bureau of Personal Belonging” is a site-specific installation comprising three ongoing works where visitors interact with the artist and other performers within a re-created bureaucratic office setting. With this interactive work, Kirby critically examines governmental process and policy while encouraging visitors and the public to trust in the validity of their own voices.

“Stacey has been a creative force on the NCMA team for several years,” says Lawrence J. Wheeler, director of the NCMA. “It is most gratifying—and exciting—to watch her emerge as an artist of international importance. She has a lot to say. We congratulate her on her ArtPrize honor.”

As conservation assistant at the NCMA, Kirby assists conservators with treatment and maintenance of the Museum’s collection, outdoor sculptures, and special exhibitions.

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years, from ancient Egypt to the present, making the institution one of the premier art museums in the South. The Museum’s collection provides educational, aesthetic, intellectual, and cultural experiences for the citizens of North Carolina and beyond. The 164-acre Museum Park showcases the connection between art and nature through site-specific works of environmental art. The Museum offers changing national touring exhibitions, classes, lectures, family activities, films, and concerts.

The Museum opened West Building, home to the permanent collection, in 2010. The North Carolina Museum of Art, Lawrence J. Wheeler, director, is located at 2110 Blue Ridge Road in Raleigh. It is the art museum of the State of North Carolina, Pat McCrory, governor, and an agency of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, Susan Kluttz, secretary.

For further information contact Emily Kowalski by calling 919/664-6795 or e-mail to (ekowalski@ncartmuseum.org).

North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, NC, Named One of Top 125 Buildings Since 1891 by “Architectural Record”

September 8, 2016

nc-museum-of-art-logo

The North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA), in Raleigh, NC, has been selected by “Architectural Record” as one of the top 125 most important works of architecture built since the magazine’s founding in 1891. The publication recognized the Museum’s West Building, which was designed by New York–based architects Thomas Phifer and Partners and North Carolina–based landscape architects Surface 678 (then Lappas + Havener), and which opened in 2010. The list of 125 buildings was created by “Architectural Record” editors to commemorate the magazine’s 125th anniversary.

916nc-museum-of-art-arch1

“The Museum is honored to be recognized by ‘Architectural Record’, one of the most distinguished and world-renowned architectural publications,” says director Lawrence J. Wheeler. “We’re incredibly proud to be ranked among such significant and innovative buildings from around the globe.”

Glass and aluminum-clad with striking simplicity and state-of-the-art environmental features, the Museum’s West Building has an open floor plan reinforcing connections to art across time and culture. Adjacent to the 1983 building designed by Edward Durrell Stone, the single-story building was created specifically to showcase the Museum’s wide-ranging permanent collection and features a central sculpture hall and 40 galleries. With the exterior 50 percent glass, the 127,000-square-foot space has an innovative day lighting system to bathe the collection in an even glow of natural light, illuminating colors in Old Master paintings as originally intended. Landscaped sculpture gardens, courtyards, and reflecting pools surround the building and connect seamlessly to the Museum’s 164-acre Park.

916nc-museum-of-art-arch2

“It was a privilege to work with the architectural firm Thomas Phifer and Partners on the planning and creation of our West Building,” says the NCMA’s director of planning and design Dan Gottlieb. “It showcases our collection in a setting equal to the quality of the artwork it contains. The elegance of its day-lit galleries and garden courtyards perfectly embodies our philosophy of connecting art, nature, and people.”

The West Building opened in April 2010. This fall the NCMA will complete a yearlong redesign and transformation of the Museum campus by expanding the NCMA Park. The project—which will introduce a new elliptical lawn, tree-lined parking, contemporary gardens, a promenade connecting Park and galleries, and significant public art installations by international artists—continues the Museum’s mission of providing memorable and creative experiences with both art and nature.

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years, from ancient Egypt to the present, making the institution one of the premier art museums in the South. The Museum’s collection provides educational, aesthetic, intellectual, and cultural experiences for the citizens of North Carolina and beyond. The 164-acre Museum Park showcases the connection between art and nature through site-specific works of environmental art. The Museum offers changing national touring exhibitions, classes, lectures, family activities, films, and concerts.

The Museum opened West Building, home to the permanent collection, in 2010. The North Carolina Museum of Art, Lawrence J. Wheeler, director, is located at 2110 Blue Ridge Road in Raleigh. It is the art museum of the State of North Carolina, Pat McCrory, governor, and an agency of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, Susan Kluttz, secretary.

For further information call the Museum at 919/839-6262 or visit (www.ncartmuseum.org).

North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, NC, to Install Sculpture by Cuban Artist Yoan Capote in Museum Park

June 7, 2016

nc-museum-of-art-logo

The North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA) in Raleigh, NC, has been given a new work by Cuban artist Yoan Capote to be installed in its 164-acre Museum Park. The sculpture, titled “Open Mind (Barricades)”, is made from metal crowd-control barricades and is designed to resemble a brain if viewed from above. A gift by an anonymous donor, it is the first installation funded by the NCMA’s new Art in the Environment Fund, which was established to support permanent, loaned, and temporary installations of public art in the Museum Park and community. “Open Mind” is the second work by Capote in the Museum’s permanent collection and will be installed over the course of three days, June 7−9, 2016.

616NC-Museum-of-Art--sculpture
Yoan Capote, “Open Mind (Barricades)”, 2014, metal, installed dimensions approx. H. 11 x W. 98 x D. 72 ft., Gift of anonymous donor, © 2014 Yoan Capote, Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. Special thanks to Mac and Keats for the installation of “Open Mind” at the North Carolina Museum of Art.

Appropriating utilitarian metal barricades used for crowd control, Capote created the intricate labyrinth, “Open Mind,” modeled after a diagram of the human brain. He imagines visitors walking through the maze “like neurons interacting” inside the brain. In Capote’s words, “When I saw the piece from above, it made me think of each barricade as all the rules, dogmas, and taboos that are intended to control our behavior.” By elevating the barricades, he subverts their original use and intention: visitors are not kept out, but rather invited in to freely wander through the work.

Employing a variety of media—painting, photography, video, sculpture, and installation—Yoan Capote, who lives and works in Havana, Cuba, makes works of art that poetically capture both highly personal experiences and universal issues of power, difference, alienation, isolation, dislocation, censorship, and restriction.

The Art in the Environment Fund was established to support works of permanent or temporary art in the Museum Park as well as temporary installations of public art in the Raleigh community and beyond. It is dedicated to investment in significant and engaging public art and to providing accessible and meaningful experiences with art and nature for the people of North Carolina. Capote’s “Open Mind” is the first installation funded by the Art in the Environment Fund. Additional works of public art will be installed throughout the summer and fall in celebration of the NCMA’s Park expansion.

For further information call 919/664-6795 or visit (www.ncartmuseum.org).

Artspace in Raleigh, NC, Calls for Entries for FRESH Exhibit – Deadline May 2, 2016

April 20, 2016

artspace-orange-logo

FRESH is an exhibition of new works by North Carolina artists. But with a creative twist! All submitted artwork will be on display and available for sale during the FRESH Preview May 19-30, 2016. The final juried exhibition opens June 3 and runs through June 24, 2016.

Two events held before the jurying process allow visitors to view all the artwork entered into the exhibition before the jurying takes place. All entered artwork will be available for sale during these events even if it is not selected for the final exhibition.

Exhibition proceeds support the Artspace Inspiration Fund, nurturing the next generation of visual artists.

Open to NC artists, 18+. All media. Must be new work, less than 2 years old, limited in size to a max of 36″ wide and 48″ high and available for purchase. Artists may submit one piece. Artists will receive 50% commission of sales. Artists may choose to designate all or a portion of art sales to Artspace for a tax-deductible donation.

Applications and work due May 2, 2016. Submission fees: $15 for members, $25 for non-members.

The exhibition and awards will be juried by Marshall N. Price, Nancy Hanks Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art, Nasher Museum of Art, Duke University. Cash awards for Best in Show ($1000), 2nd place ($500), 3rd place ($250), and People’s Choice ($100).

FRESH Look: Pre-jury Viewing Party on Thursday May 19, 6-8pm
FRESH Fun: Family Day Event on Saturday May 21, 10am-1pm
FRESH Opening: First Friday June 3, 6-10pm
FRESH Gameshow: Thursday June 16, 6-8pm

Apply at (http://artspacenc.org/events/fresh-at-artspace/)

For further info e-mail to (info@artspacenc.org).

North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, NC, Receives $500,000 Grant from John William Pope Foundation to Name Gallery in Memory of Joyce W. Pope

March 21, 2016

nc-museum-of-art-logo

The North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA), in Raleigh, NC, has received a grant from the John William Pope Foundation for $500,000 to name one of the Museum’s gallery spaces. The Museum’s Gallery 2, a 28,000-square-foot multipurpose temporary exhibition gallery, will now be named the Joyce W. Pope Gallery in memory of the late Joyce W. Pope.

“We are incredibly grateful for the generous support from the John William Pope Foundation,” says Museum Director Lawrence J. Wheeler. “With Joyce W. Pope’s passion for and support of the arts, this is the perfect way to honor her memory.”

Joyce W. Pope was president of the Pope Foundation from 1986 to 1992. She was a fixture in Raleigh as she supported her husband, John, while he grew Variety Wholesalers, Inc., from five stores into one of the largest retailing chains in the Southeast. Joyce was a dedicated patron of arts, serving as a founding member of the Raleigh Fine Arts Society.

“This is a wonderful way to honor my mother’s dedication to the arts,” says John William Pope Foundation Chairman Art Pope. “She would be humbled. But I also think she would be delighted to know that many visitors, particularly student visitors, will continue to enjoy fine works of art during their Museum trips in a gallery that bears her name.”

The first exhibition to be presented in the new Joyce W. Pope Gallery is American Impressionist: Childe Hassam and the Isles of Shoals, which opens on March 19. Past exhibitions presented in the gallery space include Leonardo da Vinci’s Codex Leicester and the Creative Mind, Edvard Munch: Symbolism in Print, and Object of Devotion: Medieval English Alabaster Sculpture from the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Naming opportunities provide unrestricted general operating support to the Museum to offer a wide variety of exhibitions, concerts, lectures, and educational programming to the people of North Carolina. Seventy percent of the Museum’s budget used for operations and programming is provided to the Museum through private contributions from individuals, corporations, and foundations. The remaining 30 percent is provided through appropriations from the State.

The North Carolina Museum of Art’s permanent collection spans more than 5,000 years, from ancient Egypt to the present, making the institution one of the premier art museums in the South. The Museum’s collection provides educational, aesthetic, intellectual, and cultural experiences for the citizens of North Carolina and beyond. The 164-acre Museum Park showcases the connection between art and nature through site-specific works of environmental art. The Museum offers changing national touring exhibitions, classes, lectures, family activities, films, and concerts.

The Museum opened West Building, home to the permanent collection, in 2010. The North Carolina Museum of Art, Lawrence J. Wheeler, director, is located at 2110 Blue Ridge Road in Raleigh. It is the art museum of the State of North Carolina, Pat McCrory, governor, and an agency of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, Susan Kluttz, secretary.

The John William Pope Foundation is a Raleigh grantmaker whose giving has totaled more than $100 million since 1986. Most of the foundation’s giving is directed to North Carolina nonprofits in the areas of human services, education, arts, and public policy. The Pope Foundation receives its support from the Pope family, owner and operator of the Henderson-based Variety Wholesalers, Inc.

For further information call the Museum at 919/664-6795 or visit (www.ncartmuseum.org).

NC Museum of Art in Raleigh, NC, Offers Rare Opportunity to Watch Conservator at Work

February 9, 2016

nc-museum-of-art-logo

Beginning Feb. 20, 2016, the North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA) in Raleigh, NC, presents “Actual State”, a rare opportunity for Museum visitors to watch a conservator restore a painting in the galleries. On select days during the exhibition, NCMA conservator of paintings Noelle Ocon will bring back to life a damaged 16th-century Flemish painting—a process that is normally only completed in the conservation lab.

216NC-Museum-of-At---restore
Follower of Bernard van Orley, “The Pentecost”, circa 1530, oil on panel, 37 1/2 x 43 1/2 in., Purchased with funds from the State of North Carolina

The term actual state refers to a painting wherein the old varnishes and restorations have been removed, revealing the true condition of the original paint layer. Throughout its life, a painting can be restored many times, hiding years of damage—accidental or otherwise. As part of a conservation treatment, paintings are cleaned, or returned to their actual state, and revarnished. After revarnishing, areas of damage are blended in with the surroundings using special paints made just for conservators—a process called inpainting or retouching. The extent of original damage is very rarely revealed to the museumgoer.

In this exciting opportunity, visitors can get a behind-the-scenes look as this process unfolds. “Actual State” features two Flemish paintings from the Museum’s collection currently attributed to a follower of Bernard van Orley: “The Ascension” and “The Pentecost” (both circa 1530). Conservation treatment has been completed on “The Ascension” (cleaned, varnished, and retouched), while in the frame next to it is a photographic reproduction of “The Pentecost” prior to retouching. The painting of “The Pentecost” sits on an easel nearby—in its actual state. While on public display, it will undergo inpainting to retouch old losses, abrasions, and other damages. In an unusual fashion, only one side of the composition will be retouched first, so that the progress of restoration can be readily seen.

“Actual State” will be the first in a series of permanent collection focus exhibitions highlighting the work of the NCMA’s Conservation Department, a staff of three conservators who care for, maintain, and repair works in the Museum’s permanent collection. Information on conservation projects, frequently asked questions about conservation, and more can be found at (ncartmuseum.org/art/conservation).

“Actual State” will be on view from Feb. 20 through July 10, 2016, in the East Building, Level B, Studio 3. The exhibit  is free.

“Actual State” is organized by the North Carolina Museum of Art. Support provided by anonymous donors in honor of Noelle Ocon and Dennis P. Weller. This exhibition is also made possible, in part, by the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources; the North Carolina Museum of Art Foundation, Inc.; and the William R. Kenan Jr. Endowment for Educational Exhibitions. Research for this exhibition was made possible by Ann and Jim Goodnight/The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fund for Curatorial and Conservation Research and Travel.