Archive for the ‘Seagrove NC Visual Arts’ Category

Potteries in Seagrove, NC, Invite You to the Tea with Seagrove Pottery Gallery Crawl – Aug. 26, 2017

August 9, 2017

On Aug. 26, 2017, spend the day in Seagrove, NC, sampling iced teas and homemade treats. Relax at your own pace as you visit Blue Hen Pottery, Dean & Martin Pottery, Dover Pottery, Eck McCanless Pottery, From the Ground Up, Thomas Pottery and Red Hare Pottery. Browse shops for new wares highlighting tea. Shops are open from 10am -5pm. Pick up a pottery map at your first stop.

Visit (http://teawithseagrovepotters.webstarts.com/) for more information.

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North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Will Present Exhibit of Dinnerware and Hosts Three Intimate Dinners

June 29, 2017

“What’s For Dinner?”, an exhibit of handmade dinnerware, will be presented at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, on Aug. 5 through Nov. 25, 2017.

Handmade dinnerware does more than feed a hungry body—it provides the user with visual nourishment and tactile delight. “What’s for Dinner?” celebrates the connection between ceramics and food through the work of twenty North Carolina makers, including:

Contributing works to this exhibit include: Cady Clay Works, Courtney Martin, David Vorhees, Dean & Martin Pottery, Doug Dotson, East Fork Pottery, Great White Oak Gallery, HAAND, Heather Mae Erickson, Jugtown Pottery, Mangum Pottery, Melissa Weiss, New Salem Pottery, Nick Moen Studios, Nine Toes Pottery, Original Owens Pottery, Sedberry Pottery, Stanley Mace Andersen, Tom Gray, and Westmoore Pottery.

Please join us for the opening reception on Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017 from noon-2 pm. The reception is open to the public and free of charge. All dinnerware in the show will be available for purchase. Purchased dinnerware must remain in the show until its end date.

Have Dinner @ The North Carolina Pottery Center

We’re hosting three intimate dinners at the North Carolina Pottery Center featuring the dinnerware that’s on display.

The first of these dinners is Friday evening, Aug. 4, 2017, the day before the exhibition officially opens, which combined with a delightful four-course dinner and wine from Elliots on Linden of Pinehurst, NC, makes this dinner extra special! Executive Director Lindsey Lambert will be your host for the evening.

Tickets are $160 each. Only 20 available.

Call 336/873-8430 or visit the North Carolina Pottery Center at 233 East Avenue, Seagrove, NC, to make reservations.

The North Carolina Pottery Center is a nonprofit organization. All proceeds will support the center’s mission of promoting awareness and appreciation of the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in our great state!

Seagrove Potters in Seagrove, NC, Offers Stepping into the Craft Events During July 2017

June 22, 2017

Experience something new and adventurous as you spend a Saturday in Seagrove, NC. During the month of July 2017, the pottery shops in Seagrove have something planned each Saturday. Observe demonstrations of wheel turning, carving techniques, raku firing and much more. If you’ve been wanting to get your hands into some clay, this is your opportunity. You can participate in hands-on activities during this special month long event. Try making pottery on the wheel, learn a hand-building technique or make a pottery keepsake of your very own. The participating potters are willing to share behind the scenes activities, so you can join in the craft.

Stepping into the Craft – Saturdays in Seagrove, NC, will take place on July 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017, from 10am – 5pm.

Each participating shop will share their own special style and have their own specific event. Each Saturday is different. For a list of participating shops and event schedules go to (https://discoverseagrove.com/saturdays-in-seagrove/). Print or download the detailed listing. Pickup an area map and guide at your first stop and have a fun Saturday in Seagrove.

Seagrove is in the central piedmont of North Carolina where more than 100 ceramic artists call home. Visitors can shop galleries and studios from the town’s center, extending to a 20-mile radius along the scenic NC Pottery Highway. Tour the Seagrove shops to experience the 200-year old pottery making tradition. The pottery shops of Seagrove are open year-round.

For further information visit (http://discoverseagrove.com/saturdays-in-seagrove/) or visit Facebook at (http://www.facebook.com/seagrovepotters).

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Celebrates Traditional Arts Program for Students

March 30, 2017

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is celebrating the work of the ten budding potters who participated in the spring 2017 session of the Center’s Traditional Arts Program for Students (TAPS). TAPS is an afterschool pottery class hosted by the NC Pottery Center in partnership with Seagrove Elementary School and sponsored by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources. Each fall and spring, ten fifth grade students from nearby Seagrove Elementary School are invited to participate in the program, and learn pottery local history and skills.

Chad Brown with student

The TAPS program aims to connect North Carolina students with local traditional artists. Students receive instruction in an art form that has deep cultural roots in their community, taught by experts utilizing traditional techniques. Students learn numerous clay processes, including wheel-throwing, hand-building, glazing and firing of pottery forms drawn from traditional use and practice.  Seagrove potter Sid Luck, winner of the 2014 North Carolina Heritage Award, leads the class. Luck is assisted by Seagrove potters Chad Brown and Susan Greene, NCPC Artists-in-Residence Owen Laurion and Kirsten Olson, and NCPC educational program manager, Emily Lassiter.

“The North Carolina Pottery Center’s TAPS program is so fortunate to have fifth-generation potter Sid Luck teaching Seagrove pottery traditions to the community’s young people,” says Sally Peterson, Folklife Director at the NC Arts Council. “A career public school teacher himself, Sid combines high level teaching skills with time-honored pottery knowledge to present an enriching program that connects students to the very heart of their community. Rising fifth-generation potter Chad Brown and others contribute an energy and creativity to the program that would be difficult to match anywhere outside of a university program.  I love visiting the TAPS program, because the students are so enthusiastic and really perform way beyond expectation,” says Peterson.

The spring 2017 TAPS session will end Wednesday, Apr. 5, 2017.  To celebrate our students’ hard work, a reception and exhibition of TAPS students’ pottery is planned for that day, from 2:45 until 4pm in the education building. The general public is invited to attend.

For more information, please call 336/873.8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Kirsten Olsen for Clay Talks – Apr. 6, 2017

March 30, 2017

Join us at the on April 6th for a presentation by Kirsten Olson, currently an Artist-in-Residence at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, for Clay Talks.

A graduate of Juniata College in Huntington, PA with a BA in Anthropology, Minor Fine Arts and an MFA Ceramics from University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Olsen most recently served as Ceramics Adjunct Faculty and Ceramic Studio Technician at the Art Department of Juniata College. She has been an Artist-in-Residence at the Pottery Center since Oct. 2016. She was named one of American Craft Week’s 2016 “Rising Stars; 30 Exceptional Crafts People under the age of 30” and most recently announced as a finalist in “Functional Ceramics” for the 2017 NICHE Awards.

Olsen says, “My inspiration as a ceramic artist is strongly grounded in anthropology, particularly cultural customs, ceremonies, and rituals. My ceramic vessels not only contain the food and drink that nourish, but also contain the ideas of culture and community.” Highly inspired by Alaskan culture and the North, her work recalls the shapes of baskets, hats, mukluk patterns, and ivory objects while the glaze and kiln firing process also reflect textures associated with natural materials, such as bone, ivory, and wood.

Olsen’s talk will address her background in clay and anthropology, as well as recent endeavors at the Pottery Center. A potluck at 6pm will begin the evening’s events, followed by the slide talk at 7pm. Come out for a great night of food and community!

Location: The NCPC Educational Building located behind the NC Pottery Center at 233 East Avenue, Seagrove, 27341.

This presentation is free and open to the public.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation, and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the NC Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you! The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

For more information, call the center at 336/873-8430. This ongoing lecture series is facilitated by Emily Lassiter, NCPC Educational Program Manager.

NC Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Clay Talks with Ray Owen – Mar. 5, 2017

February 27, 2017

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Please join us for a special slide presentation by Ray Owen at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, on Sunday, Mar. 5, starting at 2pm. The open house at the center that day will start at 1pm.

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Owen’s presentation, “The Busbees and the Jugtown Legacy,” is being held in conjunction with “The Busbee Legacy: Jugtown & Beyond, 1917-2017,” an exhibition that is currently up through April 22, 2017. His presentation in being done in conjunction with the NC Potters Conference.

Owen will be describing the context for establishing the Jugtown pottery, the relationship between regional potters and the Sandhills resorts, and how Jugtown continues to thrive.

Owen is a writer and conservationist who has been a contributor to “O. Henry” and “PineStraw” magazines. Recent projects include writing the words for composer David Ludwig’s “Songs from the Bleeding Pines,” commissioned in 2016 by the Ravinia Festival in Chicago. Other recent work includes writing the forward for “Jugtown Pottery 1917-2017: A Century of Art & Craft in Clay,” featured guest for UNC-TV’s Collecting Carolina series, and narration for the film “More Than Pine Trees and Sand: Disappearing Frogs Project.” Film work includes writing and directing “Siren of the Round Timber Tract,” premiering in April 2017. Public service has included the Stewardship Council of the Cultural Landscape Foundation and Vice President of Friends of Weymouth.

While most of our Clay Talks! are potlucks, this particular event is not. Light refreshments will be available courtesy of the Pottery Center starting at 1:30pm.

Location: North Carolina Pottery Center, 233 East Avenue, Seagrove, 27341. This presentation is free and open to the public.

For further information call the Center at 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Offers Pam Owens Lecture About Traditional Women Potters Exhibit – Feb. 2, 2017

January 27, 2017

ncpclogosmall

Please join us for a slide presentation at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, on Feb. 2, 2017, from 6-8pm by Pamela Lorette Owens of Jugtown Pottery.

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Owens will discuss one of the North Carolina Pottery Center’s current exhibitions, “North Carolina’s Traditional Women Potters,” which she curated. “North Carolina’s Traditional Women Potters” is on exhibit through Feb. 11, 2017. The exhibition is the culmination of a study and lecture presented by Owens at the Catawba Valley Pottery & Antiques Festival, in Hickory, NC, in 2015.

The twentieth century saw the emergence of women potters from the lineage of European settlers, and while Native American women had been making pottery here for thousands of years, their names and work were definitively recorded through writing and images only as the century progressed. This exhibition is an examination of North Carolina women who were established potters by 1975 and who came from or chose to work and learn through a traditional approach. The focus is on women who made and/or decorated pots, but all of the women who worked daily in potteries were integral to the process.

A potluck at 6pm will begin the evening’s events, followed by the slide talk at 7pm. Come out for a great night of food and community! This presentation is free and open to the public.

The NCPC Educational Building is located behind the NC Pottery Center at 233 East Avenue, Seagrove, 27341.

For more information, call the Pottery Center at 336-873-8430.

Traditional Arts Program for Students Celebrated at NC Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC

December 6, 2016

ncpclogosmall

The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is celebrating the work of the ten budding potters who participated in the fall 2016 session of the Center’s Traditional Arts Program for Students (TAPS). TAPS is an afterschool pottery class hosted by the NC Pottery Center in partnership with Seagrove Elementary School and sponsored by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources. Each fall and spring, ten fifth grade students from nearby Seagrove Elementary School are invited to participate in the program, and learn pottery local history and skills.

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North Carolina Folk Heritage Award winner Sid Luck teaches students how to make face jugs, a traditional form in Southern pottery.

The TAPS program aims to connect North Carolina students with local traditional artists. Students receive instruction in an art form that has deep cultural roots in their community, taught by experts utilizing traditional techniques. Students learn numerous clay processes, including wheel-throwing, hand-building, glazing and firing of pottery forms drawn from traditional use and practice.  Seagrove potter Sid Luck, winner of the 2014 North Carolina Heritage Award, leads the class. Luck is assisted by Seagrove potters Chad Brown and Susan Greene, NCPC Artists-in-Residence Owen Laurion and Kirsten Olson, and NCPC educational program manager, Emily Lassiter.

“The North Carolina Pottery Center’s TAPS program is so fortunate to have fifth-generation potter Sid Luck teaching Seagrove pottery traditions to the community’s young people,” says Sally Peterson, Folklife Director at the NC Arts Council.  “A career public school teacher himself, Sid combines high level teaching skills with time-honored pottery knowledge to present an enriching program that connects students to the very heart of their community.  Rising fifth-generation potter Chad Brown and others contribute an energy and creativity to the program that would be difficult to match anywhere outside of a university program.  I love visiting the TAPS program, because the students are so enthusiastic and really perform way beyond expectation,” says Peterson.

The fall 2016 TAPS session will end Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016.  To celebrate our students’ hard work, a reception and exhibition of TAPS students’ pottery is planned for that day, from 2:45 until 4pm. The general public is invited to attend.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the John W. & Anna H. Hanes Foundation, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina. The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., from 10am – 4pm.

For more information, please call 336/873-8430 or visit (www.ncpotterycenter.org).

My Not So Annual Trip to the Celebration of Seagrove Potters in Seagrove, NC

November 28, 2016

We have just posted a blog entry at Carolina Arts Unleashed at (http://carolinaarts.com/wordpress/) about our latest trip to Seagrove, NC, to the 9th Celebration of Seagrove Potters.

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A tile from Acacia Art Tile at Whynot Pottery

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Works from JLK Jewelry

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Works from Bulldog Pottery

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Adds Owen Laurion as New Artist-in-Residence

October 27, 2016

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The North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, is pleased to announce the addition of Owen Laurion as our new Artist-in-Residence. Grant funding from the Windgate Charitable Foundation is allowing the center to continue its Artist-in-Residence (AiR) program.

The Pottery Center is looking forward to having Owen as its AiR for the next five months. Lindsey Lambert, executive director, says, “Having Owen as our new AiR is literally a breath of fresh air.” Between Owen and our Educational Program Manager and Project Coordinator, Emily Lassiter, we are offering educational programs and workshops, which help us better fulfill our mission of promoting awareness and appreciation of the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in our great state.”

An interdisciplinary artist, Owen combines scholarly research with a studio practice exploring the (re)production of culture and personhood in contemporary society.  Born and raised in New Hampshire, Owen has lived in a variety of communities across the US and frequently draws inspiration from these encounters of transition, identification, and space. He holds a BA from the University of Rochester in Anthropology and Philosophy and a MFA in Sculpture from the San Francisco Art Institute. He has exhibited his work nationally and is the recipient of the Robert Howe Fletcher Cup Award for Sculpture 2015, Rush Rhees Purchase Prize 2010, and was a Take Five Scholar at the University of Rochester 2010-2011. He has worked for several years as a teaching assistant at the San Francisco Art Institute and has also gained museum experience at the Cranbrook Art Museum in Bloomfield Hills, MI.

According to Owen, “My practice is largely influenced by my interests in culture, the American politic, and the stakes of personhood in contemporary society.  Working through aesthetic fabrication – the visual arts provides me with the tools to research and address the complexities of human ecology. Specifically, I have been invested in understanding the relationship between culture and the landscape, urban and rural identities, and the production of nature(s).  The relationship between individual experience and collective knowledge is often complicated by political rhetoric, media, and formal social systems. The (re)production of identity is a true struggle for many marginal communities in the US, and it is imperative to address the ethics of space.“

Owen enjoys working in tight-knit communities so his residency at the NC Pottery Center seems to be a natural fit. He has goals to extend his woodfiring skills with the Center’s groundhog and noborigama kilns. In a few short weeks, he has made strides toward that goal by ably assisting veteran groundhog kiln firer Chad Brown on September 3 with great results. He has begun an astonishing organization and inventory of the large educational building here at the Center in addition to creatively producing his own body of work.

Exhibitions are made possible through the generosity of our membership, the Mary and Elliott Wood Foundation, the John W. and Anna H. Hanes Foundation, and the Goodnight Educational Foundation. This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Thank you!

The mission of the North Carolina Pottery Center is to promote public awareness of and appreciation for the history, heritage, and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina.

The Center is located at 233 East Avenue in Seagrove, NC. Hours of operation are Tue. – Sat., from 10am – 4pm. For more information, please call 336/873-8430, visit (ncpotterycenter.org), or find us on Facebook.