Archive for the ‘Donations of Art’ Category

Disappearing Frogs Project Offers Exhibit and Panel Discussion at Museum of Life and Science in Durham, NC – March 17, 2016

March 14, 2016

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The Disappearing Frogs Project (DFP), in partnership with the Amphibian Survival Alliance (ASA), and the Museum of Life and Science (MLS), 433 W. Murray Ave. in Durham, NC, is hosting an art reception and science panel Thursday, Mar. 17, 2016, beginning at 6pm. Over 100 regional artists have donated original works of art, each capturing their personal perspective of the impact and effects of globalization.  Download invitation at (http://www.amphibians.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/postcard_web.pdf).

The DFP brings awareness to the threat of extinction and inspires action to prevent it by using art to stimulate intellectual curiosity about our environment. On Thursday evening, art and science will converge in the Terrace Gallery on the 2nd floor of the Museum. Meet and mingle with the artists and enjoy a panel discussion as science experts illuminate the environmental issues facing amphibian populations worldwide.

This is the 3rd DFP art exhibit to be installed in North Carolina since Feb. 1, 2016. The local and regional artwork which fills the exhibit space is our largest exhibition to date. It spans approximately 400 square feet and showcases nearly 200 distinctive works of art.

The DFP art exhibit is on display through May 1, 2016 and is free with admission to the Museum.

Eleven regional artists have works prominently displayed on their own wall. These artists are recognized regionally and nationally. Artistic styles range from realism to abstract, and include paintings and work in glass, wood, clay and discarded materials. Featured artists include: Leslie De Rose, Loren Di Benedetto, Sharon Dowell, Leatha Koeffler, Janet Lasher, Nerys Levy, Isaac Payne, Lori Sanderson, Ian Wegener, Pam Winegard, and Terry Thirion.

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Work by Pam Winegard

Download artist’s statements at this link (http://www.amphibians.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/artist_statements-for-2016-DFP-MLS-exhibit.pdf).

All art on exhibit is available for purchase. Proceeds from sales support ASA, world leaders in amphibian conservation, education, and research. From habitat protection to disease research, policy guidance to education program development, the Alliance builds real solutions to global threats.

Science Panel Members:

Nicolette Cagle: A dedicated naturalist and environmental educator with a PhD in Ecology. Cagle is a Lecturer in the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University where she teaches courses emphasizing natural history and environmental education & communication. She is also the Director of the Environmental Science Summer Program at Duke and Director of the NSOE Communications Studio.

Rachel Hopkins: A graduating senior at Durham Academy and a voice of the millennial generation.  Hopkins has always been interested in the natural world, and when she learned of the global decline in frogs and other amphibians, she decided to do her part to advocate change.  Among her many accomplishments in 2013 she spearheaded the designation of two North Carolina State Symbols: the State Frog (Pine Barrens Treefrog) and the State Salamander (Marbled Salamander). Now, the North Carolina Zoo features a Pine Barrens Treefrog Exhibit and is conducting field research using radio telemetry to collect important data to help this disappearing species continue to exist.

Elizabeth Losos is a tropical forest ecologist and holds PhDs in tropical ecology and a MPA in public policy. For the past 11 years, Dr. Losos has been President and CEO of the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS), a nonprofit consortium of nearly sixty universities, colleges, and research institutions from around the world. Dr Losos is also an adjunct professor at Duke University.

Ron Sutherland is a conservation scientist working with the Wildlands Network. Sutherland received his PhD in Environmental Sciences and Policy from the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University; here he studied the response of frogs, snakes, and other wildlife to urbanization in the Sandhills region of North Carolina.

Jeff Hall, Moderator, Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (PARC) biologist, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Hall works to promote habitat management that benefits reptiles and amphibians as well as other wildlife species.

The DFP has a full schedule of activities in the Triangle area and at Raven Rock State Park, Lillington, NC, throughout the month of March and April. In celebration of the NC Science Festival, April 8-24, 2016, the DFP has partnered with MLS in Durham, Marbles Kids Museum in Raleigh, NC, and Kidzu Children’s Museum in Chapel Hill, NC, for a multitude of frog-themed programming all geared toward children. All events are open to the public.

A current schedule of upcoming events can be found at the DFP website at (http://www.amphibians.org/disappearingfrogsproject/).

In 2015 the Disappearing Frogs Project partnered with the Amphibian Survival Alliance (ASA), world leaders in amphibian conservation, education, and research. The goal of the partnership is to raise awareness of global amphibian declines, inspire people to take personal action to protect these incredible species, while also providing a unique opportunity for artists to support amphibian conservation, education, and research.

The ASA is a Fiscally Sponsored Program of Global Wildlife Conservation a registered 501(c)(3). Tax ID #26-2887967

The mission of the DFP is to use art to support scientific, educational and community efforts that focus on amphibian preservation.

North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC, Calls for “Fund Drive” Donations of Pottery for the NCPC Gift Shop

March 19, 2015

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Do you happen to have a few pieces of pottery sitting around your house that need a good home? We are always looking for some “Fund Drive” pottery pieces for our gift shop here at the North Carolina Pottery Center in Seagrove, NC,

What are the “Fund Drive” pottery pieces? The center has a couple of small shelves in our gift shop where we sell pottery pieces that have been donated to center specifically to be sold to benefit the center. Proceeds from the sale of those items are incorporated into the center’s operational funds. We are starting to run low on good “Fund Drive” pieces and need to replenish our supply!

If you have some pottery pieces in decent condition that aren’t permanent collection caliber that you would like to donate to the North Carolina Pottery Center for us to sell in the gift shop to help support our mission of promoting awareness and appreciation of the history, heritage and ongoing tradition of pottery in North Carolina.

For further info contact Emily Lassiter by e-mail at (membership@ncpotterycenter.org).

Franklin G. Burroughs-Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum in Myrtle Beach, SC, Receives Valuable French Paintings from Longtime Patron

April 16, 2014

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The Franklin G. Burroughs-Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum in Myrtle Beach, SC, has received a gift of four early-19th-century oil paintings from longtime Museum friend and supporter Harold Hartshorne, Jr., who passed away in October 2013 at age 95.

The four donated works were all completed by artists associated with the Barbizon School of painting. The Barbizon School was made up of a group of French painters, who all resided and worked in the village of Barbizon as well as the Forest of Fontainebleau, just outside of Paris, from the early 1830s to the 1870s. Breaking away from the conventions of their contemporaries, Barbizon artists typically painted humble, realistic landscapes and pastoral scenes free of gallantry and idealism. The group is considered the first generation of French landscape painters to focus truly on nature. In technique, their brushstrokes tend to be painterly and rough, and their color schemes favor earth tones.

The paintings include a seascape by Charles-François Daubigny (1817-1878), considered one of the leaders of the Barbizon School; two pastoral landscapes by prominent Barbizon artists Constant Troyon (1810-1865) and Émile Van Marcke (1827-1890); and a fourth described as in the “manner of John Constable” (1776-1837), an English artist credited with inspiring the movement.

The Barbizon paintings were purchased about 1905 by Simeon B. Chapin, one of the Art Museum’s namesakes. Hartshorne inherited them from Chapin, his grandfather, and subsequently bequeathed them to the Museum.

Hartshorne was a longtime resident of Lake Geneva, WI. The son of Marietta Chapin and Harold Hartshorne, Sr., Harry was born in New York City in 1918. Following graduation from Princeton University and a brief stint on the NY Stock Exchange, he was drafted into the Army in 1941. At his father’s urging, he transferred into the Air Force and became a pilot. Fluent in French, he was tapped to train French cadets to fly. In recognition of his work, he was awarded a pair of honorary French Wings by President Charles DeGaulle after the war.

Simeon B. Chapin, son of a prominent Chicago merchant was himself a highly successful New York stock broker and real estate investor. Chapin joined with the Burroughs brothers to form the Myrtle Beach Farms Company, the predecessor to the Burroughs & Chapin Co. Hartshorne was a director of the company from 1948 to 1998; during that time he is said to have rarely missed a board meeting.

A lifelong patron of the arts, Hartshorne supported numerous arts organizations in Wisconsin and in Myrtle Beach, among them the Art Museum.

The Franklin G. Burroughs-Simeon B. Chapin Art Museum is a wholly nonprofit institution located across from Springmaid Pier at 3100 South Ocean Boulevard in Myrtle Beach. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10am to 4pm, and Sundays, 1 – 4pm. Admission is free, but donations are welcomed. Components of Museum programs are funded in part by support from the City of Myrtle Beach, the Horry County Council and the South Carolina Arts Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

For further information, call 843/238-2510, or visit (www.MyrtleBeachArtMuseum.org).