Archive for May, 2017

The June 2017 Issue of “Carolina Arts” is Now Ready to Download

May 31, 2017

The June 2017 issue of Carolina Arts is up on our website at (http://www.carolinaarts.com/617/617carolinaarts.html) – all 68 pages of it. That’s a little less than last month.

Our cover art features work by Alex Powers of Myrtle Beach, SC. We’re featuring works that have a political slant to them. Powers has no problem making a statement with his art.

So download that PDF and dig in – it makes for good reading and shows that you have lots of opportunities to enjoy the visual arts in the Carolinas. And, don’t forget to find a way to thank our advertisers – they make the paper possible.

And help us spread the paper around by sending this link to your friends.

If you want to get something in the July 2017 issue – send it now or as soon as you can. Don’t wait till the June 24th deadline.

Thanks – Tom and Linda Starland
Carolina Arts
843/693-1306
info@carolinaarts.com

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Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC Adds Quilt Block #199

May 31, 2017

Driving down Sandy Springs Road in North West Anderson County, SC, through rolling farm land you will find Bruce and Toni Smith’s home. They have sponsored the 199th quilt location on the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC.

The Lone Star quilt block can be viewed on their barn at 1101 Sandy Springs Road. We asked the Smith’s how they selected this quilt for their barn. They said, “We were in the little Amish town of Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania, and went into a store that had quilts for sale. It was here that we were amazed with all the quilts to choose from but Toni couldn’t decide on one that she was really taken with. A young Amish girl suggested that we go out into the country side and find a lady that made quilts at her home and that she really did beautiful work. We did find her the next day and made a very satisfying purchase of this quilt at her home.” Mrs. Smith stated that she has always loved quilts and wanted a quilt for their home. She continues to use the Lone Star quilt to adorn their home and now their barn.

The Smith’s live on a farm that has been in Bruce’s’ family since 1949. His family moved to this farm the year he was born and still possess the wagon his father used to move the family to their new home. They have primarily been cattle farmers and continue to run a few head of cattle. They love the rolling hills and open spaces and have a lovely bed of roses.

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD, Quilt historian states in her article “The Lone Star Quilt Design Through Time” that, ”The Lone Star quilt block is likely one of the most recognizable quilt patterns to Americans. It is also one of the oldest patterns, along with the Mariner’s Compass, Orange Peel, Job’s Trouble and Irish chain. But this is a pattern known by many names. There are variations of it with 6 points, 8 points (the most common design) or even more…”. This old multi-pieced star block is known by many names. The Mathematical Star was an early name used in England and along the Eastern US seaboard, especially near Baltimore.

The Star of Bethlehem is a well-known name for it all around the country and is still used today. Other names for the same pattern are the Star of the East, Morning Star, which is what Native American’s call it, and Lone star, which is the name given to this pattern by Texan quilters because they are called the lone star state…The Amish liked the large central Star pattern, as did the southern states, across the US. The Central States made their fair share, but it seems more were made closer to the last quarter of the 19th century and in to the 20th century’s first two quarters.” Source: New Pathways Into Quilt History.

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).

Imprimatur Charleston Launches at Corrigan Gallery in Charleston, SC – June 2, 2017

May 31, 2017

We will formally launch Imprimatur Charleston on June 2, 2017, from 5-8:30pm at Corrigan Gallery’s new location of 7 Broad Street in Charleston, SC. This organization is by, of and for printmakers and collectors to share images and information. In the tradition of Charleston Etchers’ Club and Print Studio South, we will promote and encourage printers and collectors. We will gather printmakers from around the region. We will seek out and join national and international print organizations. We would love to have many members.


Print by Margaret Peery

Louis Wright, collector and initiator of the group will speak on June 2 at the earlier end of the evening about his love of print works, his collection and his hopes for this organization.

Works by the founding members of the organization (as we started in 2013 but never launched!) will be on the walls. See our site (www.imprimaturcharleston.org) for the list of artists.

Invite all the printmakers you know. Invite all the fine art print collectors you know. Bring all interested individuals!

The Piccolo Spoleto Sundown Poetry group will come after the poetry reading (about 7:30pm) so we will have a wonderfully diverse group. There is a garden out back for conversation and relaxation so hope for a breeze!

For further info contact Lese Corrigan by e-mail at (art@lesecorrigan.com), visit (www.corrigangallery.com) or call 843/722-9868.

Hub City Empty Bowls in Spartanburg, SC, Launches 2017 Program

May 31, 2017

Hub City Empty Bowls – an annual fundraiser that uses handmade pottery bowls to feed hungry Spartanburg citizens – has set the 2017 dates for its well-attended events. There will be three regularly scheduled bowl-making events: Saturday, July 15, 2017, at 10am-noon and 1-3pm in Spartanburg Art Museum’s pottery studio at Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg, SC; Thursday, July 20, 2017, from 5-8pm at West Main Artists Co-Op, during ArtWalk; and Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017, at 10am-noon and 1-3pm at Chapman Cultural Center. Soup Day will be Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017, from 11am-4pm at Chapman Cultural Center. All events are free and family friendly.

Hub City Empty Bowls is a localized fundraiser inspired the international Empty Bowls decentralized program. Locally, the program’s spearhead Carolina Clay Artists coordinates public bowl-making sessions. At no charge, citizens of all ages are given supplies, tools, space, and instructions on how to make hand-shaped pottery bowls. Those unfinished bowls are left at the venue to be painted and fired by experienced potters. Bowls often made by children can be simple, primitive, and charming. Others made by experienced potters can be precise, intricate, and sophisticated.

With hundreds of bowls created by local citizens, Carolina Clay Artists then hosts Soup Day, an event where patrons receive the bowls – each for a $15 donation to TOTAL Ministries, a local charity that provides food and other resources to people in financial crisis. In addition to receiving bowls, the patrons can enjoy a meal of soup, bread, and tea donated by the community’s leading restaurants, hear live music, bid in a silent auction, and enjoy the fellowship and comradery of knowing they are helping to feed people in need. In 2016, the Carolina Clay Artists donated a record-breaking $33,000 to TOTAL Ministries.

“Coordinating Hub City Empty Bowls is a massive undertaking,” 2017 Chairman Bruce Bowyer said. “People want to know as soon as possible about our dates so they can plan accordingly. Some people come to all of the bowl-making sessions and Soup Day. Plus, by setting the dates early, we can better handle the large crowds of people who normally show up. It is not unusual for us to have several hundred people come to a bowl-making session. And come Soup Day, we’ll see more than a thousand.”

Despite the crowds, it is seldom anyone has to wait to make a bowl or enjoy Soup Day. Space, volunteers, and experience are plentiful enough to keep everyone engaged.

Carolina Clay Artists is a local group of hobbyist and professional potters who come together monthly to share ideas, hold workshops and demos, and tour pottery studios to see other artists’ work and learn new ideas. It is open to all who have an interest in learning and sharing about pottery. Annual dues are $35. Hub City Empty Bowls is the group’s annual charity fundraising event to help feed the hungry.

TOTAL Ministries got its start in 1982 as Project Eat. Founder Dannie Horne saw an unemployment rate of 9.7% and that many people in Spartanburg County were hungry. During the first 17 months of Project Eat’s existence, $190,000 of groceries were distributed in an effort to alleviate that problem. In 1983, TOTAL Ministries of Spartanburg County, Inc. was incorporated by 12 Spartanburg churches to carry on the work of Project Eat. Since then, additional emergency services have been added to the TOTAL mission in an effort to help those in need. For those in need, TOTAL can help with utility services, food, and medications.

Empty Bowls started in 1990 by Michigan art teacher John Hartom, who organized a charitable event to give his art students a way to make a personal difference in the lives of others in their community. Hartom’s students made pottery bowls in their high school art classes, and the finished products were then used as individual serving pieces for a fundraising meal of soup and bread. From that simple beginning, Empty Bowls has spread around the world, taking root in communities both small and large. Spartanburg had its first Empty Bowls program in 2009. All Empty Bowls efforts are locally based with all proceeds going to a local charity with a mission to alleviate hunger in its community. None of the money raised leaves the community. The lead agency, Carolina Clay Artists, donates all of its time and talents, and receives no monetary benefit. Locally, all proceeds go to TOTAL Ministries.

For more information about Hub City Empty Bowls, please visit online at (www.HubCityEmptyBowls.com) or call 864.706-3739 or 864/585-9167.

Dare County Arts Council in Manteo, NC, Announces Awards from the “20th Annual Mollie Fearing Memorial Art Show”

May 31, 2017

Hundreds of people poured into the Dare County Arts Council Gallery in Manteo, NC, on Sunday, April 30, 2017, for the opening reception of the “20th Annual Mollie Fearing Memorial Art Show”, founded by Mollie A. Fearing and Associates Inc.
.
Multi-media artist Mei Ling Cann carefully selected the following award winners:


MFMAS Best in Show Award Recipient Sue Freeman. Photo courtesy of DCAC Programs Director Fay Davis Edwards.

Lucky 12 Tavern Best in Show went to Sue Freeman “My Kind of Treasure” (wood)

Willey Agency Excellence Awards went to Rick Cocke “Circus Stars” (acrylic), Mary Edwards “Old Nags Head Pier” (watercolor), Dawn Moraga “Red Sky in the Morning” (acrylic), and Jefferson Glover “Sin Bearer” (mixed media)

Honorable Mentions went to Thomas Dean “Yin Shell Yang” (acrylic), Sean Ballentine “Jennette’s Pier” (photography), Feather Phillips “Three Turnips” (watercolor), and Mandy Bartell “Grace is Gone” (copper)

People’s Choice Award: Petie Brigham “Hooray! Beach Day!” (oil painting)

“This exhibition maintains a well-balanced flow of colors and compositions, while utilizing a varied range of media and imagery,” said judge Mei Ling Cann. “I was delighted to see the range of talent in the Outer Banks community and enjoyed meeting the local artists.”

Presented by Zillie’s Island Pantry on Ocracoke Island, this year’s show features 80 entries by local Outer Banks artists.

“Winning an excellence award means a lot to me, especially this year,” said artist Dawn Moraga. “I’ve been going deep with my art trying to take it to the next level and I feel like this piece represents the direction I want to go.”

The Mollie Fearing Memorial Art Show is held in memory of Mollie A. Fearing, one of Dare County Arts Council’s founders.

“Dare County Arts Council is thankful to have had the guidance and vision of Mollie Fearing during the early years of this organization,” said Dare County Arts Council Executive Director Chris Sawin. “For twenty years we have gladly paid tribute to her memory through this fun, eclectic exhibit.”

A special thank you to Kelly’s Restaurant and Tavern for providing delicious hors d’oeuvres at the opening reception.

This project was supported by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

For more information about upcoming Dare County Arts Council events and exhibitions, please call 252/473-5558 or visit (www.DareArts.org).

Dare County Arts Council is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit arts organization dedicated to supporting the arts in Dare County.

 

Crooked Creek Art League in Chapin, SC, Receives Grant from SC Arts Commission

May 31, 2017

The Crooked Creek Art League (CCAL) in Chapin, SC, has been awarded a grant by the South Carolina Arts Commission for the 2017 fiscal year. The support is a grant that will help with annual operating expense which will encompass not only monthly general membership meetings which include refreshments and 1 ½ hour arts education program but also helped CCAL conduct its “22nd annual Juried Art Show”. The annual juried show took place Mar. 20, 2017. The show highlighted over 100 pieces of art that were displayed at Crooked Creek Park. The show recognized 20 pieces of art with $2000 awarded in prizes.

The South Carolina Arts Commission grant will enable CCAL to more fully achieve our mission of encouragement and support of new and established artist, to offer outlets to improve skills, display and sell art, and allow artist and art supporters to socialize and network.

The South Carolina Arts Commission is the state agency charged with creating a thriving arts environment that benefits all South Carolinians, regardless of their location or circumstance. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission is working to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas: art education , community arts development and artist development. Headquartered in Columbia, SC, the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina and by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts. For more information visit (www.SouthCarolinaArts.com) or call 803/734-8696.

CCAL encourages persons with art backgrounds or just a general interest in the arts to attend our monthly general membership meetings or visit us at (www.crookedcreekart.org).

Congratulations to the winners of the “22nd annual Juried Art Show” for Crooked Creek Art League reception was given Mar. 20, 2017 at Crooked Creek Park Chapin SC.

Winners included: Sandra Oliver, Roger Buenzow, Karen Larrabee, Dan Frick, Randy Spencer, Anna Kay Singley, Ann Hightower Wright, Stephanie Arnold, Ron Weathers, Al Leitch, Richard Robertson. Barbara Teusink, Raja Londhe, Ingrid Carson, Shin Wilbanks, Jean Kirkley, Ruby DeLoach and Tommy Thompson.

AFAS Center for the Arts Opens in Winston-Salem, NC

May 31, 2017

The sleek new AFAS Center for the Arts, located at the corner of Liberty and Seventh streets in Winston-Salem, NC, opened to the public on Saturday, May 6, 2017. The local nonprofit organization Art for Art’s Sake (AFAS) commissioned the 14,500 square foot, three-story building, which was constructed over a period of 15 months.

The Center’s official opening will be celebrated with a public ribbon-cutting ceremony at 2pm, on May 6, accompanied by live music, food trucks, ARTivity on the Green mural wall painting and family activities.

This latest addition to the city’s burgeoning Arts District consolidates several AFAS activities and locations that were previously scattered throughout downtown. The building houses AFAS’ headquarters, as well as Red Dog Gallery, Unleashed Arts Center and Studio 2, a jewelry studio. There are also 10 artist studios available for lease at affordable rates.

The Center’s location – adjacent to ARTivity on the Green art park – extends the Arts District’s footprint into a previously underdeveloped area of the city.

Harry Knabb, AFAS chairman and chief executive, said the new headquarters underscores AFAS’ continued commitment to the Arts District and the city’s arts community overall, while also ensuring the viability of AFAS for generations to come.

ARTivity on the Green and the AFAS Center for the Arts have both been made possible via generous grants – primarily one from the Thomas J. Regan Jr. Foundation – and both projects have enlisted the professional skills of several local businesses; STITCH Design Shop and Frank L. Blum Construction Co. served as the architect and general contractor for both projects, respectively.

For further information contact Harry Knabb, AFAS Chair, by calling 336/416-0089 or Sylvia Green, AFAS Vice Chair at 336/782-5958.

Photo caption: Special translucent panels allow the new AFAS Center for the Arts building to literally glow from within at night.

The Arts Council of Wilmington/New Hanover County in Wilmington, NC, Calls for Applications for Grassroots Arts Program Grant

May 31, 2017

Since 1977, the North Carolina Arts Council’s Grassroots Arts Program has provided North Carolina citizens access to quality arts experiences. The program distributes funds for the arts in all 100 counties of the state primarily through partnerships with local arts councils. The Arts Council of Wilmington/New Hanover County serves as the NC Arts Council’s Designated County Partner in awarding subgrants in New Hanover County.

For complete info visit (http://artscouncilofwilmington.org/?page_id=3401).

For other info call the council at 910/343-0998 or e-mail to (info@artscouncilof wilmington.org).

Downtown Spartanburg, SC, Mural Celebrates USC Upstate’s 50th Anniversary

May 29, 2017

As part of its 50th Anniversary Celebration, the University of South Carolina Upstate commissioned a commemorative mural and it is catching a lot of attention along a major corridor in downtown Spartanburg. The 50th Anniversary mural marks a significant part of the USC Upstate’s history while providing a visual voice that the university remains youthful, energetic and cutting edge.

“I cannot be more excited to have the University of South Carolina Upstate mural featured in downtown Spartanburg,” said Chancellor Brendan Kelly. “This amazing artwork encapsulates the history of USC Upstate, its strong reputation of serving as a critical force in fulfilling regional and state workforce needs, and its brilliant future.”


Eli Blasko, co-owner of Bannan Blasko, LLC, perched on scaffolding, works diligently on the border of one of the mural’s panels.

The mural spans the entire wall of Gallery East, located at 512 East Main Street just a block away from the intersection of East Main Street and Pine Street.

“I am eternally grateful to Jason Hiltabiddle for providing such a prominent location for USC Upstate to share its remarkable story,” said Kelly. “This is just the beginning of how USC Upstate intends to approach deliberate storytelling and branding.”


USC Upstate graduate Russell Bannan, co-owner of Bannan Blasko LLC, works on some of the intricate details of the mural.

The mural focuses primarily on themes of education, growth, vitality and strength, which permeate the design in a multitude of ways, on both literal and symbolic levels.

“This allows it to capture the values of the institution’s character and mission, while simultaneously allowing it to stand freely as a unique and cohesive piece of fine art,” said Russell Bannan, a graduate of USC Upstate and co-owner of Bannan Blasko LLC, a public art and design focused media company that designed and painted the mural.


Eli Blasko, top, Miranda Peterson, center, and Russell Bannan, below, spent Friday and Saturday working on the USC Upstate mural painted on the wall of Gallery East, located at 512 E. Main Street.

Compositionally, the mural is strategically designed to lead the viewer’s eye from left to right. Because of this, imagery from early in the school’s history is placed at left, visually the “beginning” of the piece, and more contemporary imagery is placed at right.

“In this way, a longer viewing experience should be punctuated by seeing the Upstate logo within a robust visual backdrop before walking away. Likewise, someone passing by quickly in a vehicle or on foot will be drawn to the area of the mural housing the USC Upstate logo,” explained Eli Blasko, co-owner of Bannan Blasko LLC.


Eli Blasko, top, Miranda Peterson, center, and Russell Bannan, below, spent Friday and Saturday working on the USC Upstate mural painted on the wall of Gallery East, located at 512 E. Main Street.

The artistic talent of Bannan and Blasko can be found throughout including “There’s only one. Spartanburg” mural and the popular “Love Where You Live” mural that the two worked with other artists to create. They have also painted the crosswalks at Liberty and East Main Streets and completed several sculptural murals for Drayton Mills Loft Apartments.

With 6,000 students, more than 1,000 employees and nearly 30,000 alumni who live in the area, the USC Upstate 50th Anniversary mural is sure to become a popular destination for photos and institutional pride.

For more information, contact Tammy E. Whaley, assistant vice chancellor for university communications, at 864/503-5210 or e-mail her at (twhaley@uscupstate.edu).

Explaining the symbolism in the mural:

Peaches – The present location of the USC Upstate campus owned by Henry Gramling who used the land as a peach orchard and soybean farm. In 1967, the Spartanburg County Commission for Higher Education acquired 22 acres of land from Mr. Gramling for $100,000 and he donated 27 acres for the establishment of a new campus, which now includes 300 acres.

Scenic background – The beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains can often be seen from the USC Upstate campus.

Trees – Since 2008 USC Upstate has been designated a Tree Campus USA by the Arbor Day Foundation, for its dedication to campus forestry management and environmental stewardship. USC Upstate is also home to the 12-acre Susan Jacobs Arboretum that is a place of serene natural beauty. It features a 300-seat amphitheater, lighted walkways, foliage indigenous to the area, and rows of Nuttall Oak trees defining the north quadrangle. A meandering creek lined with stones and boulders completes this tranquil setting.

USCS Rifles – Prior to 2004, the University was named University of South Carolina Spartanburg and its mascot was The Rifles, which paid homage to the Revolutionary War history of the Upstate of South Carolina. On July 1, 2004, the name was changed to University of South Carolina Upstate to signal a new era of academic expansion to Greenville, tremendous growth, qualitative improvements and economic impact across the I-85 corridor. The mascot was changed to Sparty to maintain a connection to the original name and commitment to the Spartanburg community.

177 Founding Class – The Spartanburg Regional Campus of the University of South Carolina opened on September 18, 1967 at Spartanburg General Hospital. Student enrollment was 177 of which 36 were nursing majors.

Nurses Cap – The university was founded when Spartanburg General Hospital (now Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System) announced plans to close its nursing education program, which would create a dire nursing shortage for Spartanburg County. A drop shadow creates a three-dimensional quality to the image, and visually brings the portrait forward to emphasize its importance as a historical symbol for the university.

Gold Dome – The Gold Dome that sits atop the John C. Stockwell Administration Building, which is the first building erected on the campus in 1969. It is a gleaming iconic university symbol that has remained unchanged since the Spartanburg Regional Campus (now USC Upstate) was officially dedicated on April 17, 1970.

1967 – 2017 – The South Carolina General Assembly passed Act No. 36 on February 16, 1967 to establish the
Spartanburg County Commission for Higher Education to undertake the creation of a university campus in Spartanburg. USC Upstate is celebrating its 50th Anniversary.

50 Years – The University is celebrating its 50th Anniversary.

Spartan – This Spartan symbol represents the USC Upstate Spartans athletic teams. Sparty is the USC Upstate mascot.

#SpartanStrong – Spartan Strong, a slogan of support for USC Upstate, conveys the unique strength and resiliency that allows an Upstate Spartan to carry on no matter the situation. The phrase was initially coined in October 2015 as words of encouragement and unity for University community upon the death of four student-athletes.

30,000 Alumni – Nearly 30,000 students have earned their degrees from USC Upstate. Approximately 85 percent of the alumni choose to remain in the Upstate to build their lives and careers, making a significant impact on the region’s economy and quality of life.

Diploma Scroll – The diploma scroll signifies the successful attainment of degrees.

Globe – The globe pays tribute to USC Upstate’s diverse and dynamic community of approximately 6,000 students from 26 states and 17 countries, USC Upstate is a wonderful blend of traditional and nontraditional students who reflect the Upstate’s rich international character. Home to more than one million people and boasting the highest per capita international investment of any county in the nation, the Upstate region provides boundless academic, professional, and cultural outlets for students to develop skills and establish meaningful connections.

The University of South Carolina Upstate is a regional, comprehensive university that offers more than 40 bachelor’s degree programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business administration, nursing, and teacher education, and master’s degrees in education, informatics, and nursing. These are degrees that help students to transition easily to careers in the Upstate region. USC Upstate is committed to fulfilling regional and state workforce needs and thus the university is a major engine of social and economic development.  Comprised of a diverse and dynamic community of approximately 6,000 students from 26 states and 17 countries, USC Upstate is a wonderful blend of traditional and nontraditional students who reflect the Upstate’s rich international character. USC Upstate offers a balance of strengths that, when added up, results in a learning experience that’s hard to match. The academic programs are accredited and highly ranked, with amazing research and internship opportunities for students. USC Upstate has its main campus in Spartanburg, the George Dean Johnson, Jr. College of Business and Economics and the UPSTATE Gallery on Main in downtown Spartanburg, two locations in Greenville, SC, and a growing number of programs online. The USC Upstate Spartans, which fields 17 varsity sports, compete on the NCAA Division I level as a member of the Atlantic Sun Conference. Nearly 30,000 alumni have earned degrees from USC Upstate and approximately 85 percent choose to remain in the Upstate region to build their lives and careers, making a significant impact of the region’s economy and quality of life.

Learn more at (www.uscupstate.edu).

South Carolina Watermedia Society Calls For Entries for Nationwide Digital Show – Deadline July 28, 2017

May 28, 2017

The South Carolina Watermedia Society is pleased to announce its Nationwide Digital Show which will be on display at the Charleston International Airport atrium, in North Charleston, SC, on Oct. 7 – Nov. 25, 2017, and will be displayed digitally until Oct. 2018.

Entry Deadline: July 28, 2017

About The Digital Show

The South Carolina Watermedia Society is excited to open its first nationwide digital show. We hope you will participate and invite your friends and students to participate. Everyone who enters will have their work displayed digitally on the SCWS website for a full year and the top ten award winners will be displayed at the Charleston International Airport from Oct. 7 – Nov. 25, 2017. The society’s annual statewide Traveling Show will also include the top 30 award winners from the digital show. It will run from Dec. 2017 – Sept. 2018.

Awards:
$8,000 in prizes will be awarded.
$1,000 Best In Show Prize

Important Dates:
July 28 –      Entry Deadline
Sept. – Award Winners Notified
Oct. 7 – Annual Luncheon, Time and Location – TBA
Oct. 7 – Opening Reception, 4:30 – 6:30 pm, Charleston International Airport
Oct. 7 – Nov. 25 – Show Displayed at Charleston International Airport Airium

The Show will be judged by Linda Baker (https://www.lindadalybaker.com/about).

If you are in the top ten selected:
After the thirty award winners are selected, the top ten winners will be contacted to ship or bring their original or a giclee print to be on display from Oct. 7 – Nov. 25 at the Charleston International Airport.

Artists are asked to include their artwork under their own liability insurance for security purposes.

Digital Show Entry
1) Register, Submit Image and Pay entry fee.
We will be using CaFE’ (Call For Entry), a website designed for art events.

Click here (https://www.callforentry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=4437) for details and rules for the call for entry.

• Current SCWS members receive free entry. (You will receive an e-mail with a coupon code).
• Non-members – Entry fee is $55.

For further info e-mail to (scwatermediasociety@gmail.com).