Archive for the ‘Art Tour’ Category

Arts Council of York County in Rock Hill, SC, Offer Tour to Winston-Salem, NC, to See Georgia O’Keeffe Exhibition – Sept. 21, 2017

August 31, 2017

The Arts Council of York County is hosting a bus trip from the Center for the Arts, 121 E. Main St., Rock Hill, SC, to the Reynolda House Museum of American Art in Winston-Salem, NC, to see the exhibit, “Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern”, on Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017. The bus will depart from the Center for the Arts at 9am, and will return at 5pm.


Bruce Weber (American, born 1946). “Georgia O’Keeffe”, Abiquiu, NM, 1984. Gelatin silver print, 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm). Bruce Weber and Nan Bush Collection, New York. © Bruce Weber

From the Reynolda House Museum of American Art: “The Reynolda House Museum of American Art marks its centennial as an estate and its fiftieth anniversary as a museum with an exhibition of the work of Georgia O’Keeffe. “Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern” explores how the artist’s modern sensibility saturated her art, her life, her homes, and her carefully fashioned public (and private) personas. In addition to a number of carefully chosen paintings by O’Keeffe, and photographs of her homes, the exhibition features selected items from her personal wardrobe that highlight her preferences for compact masses, organic silhouettes, and minimal ornamentation. The Reynolda House is one of only three venues to host the exhibition, and the only venue south of New York.”


Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986). “Ram’s Head, White Hollyhock—Hills” (Ram’s Head and White Hollyhock, NM), 1935. Oil on canvas, 30 x 36 in. (76.2 x 91.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Bequest of Edith and Milton Lowenthal, 1992.11.28. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

Tickets are $75 for members of the Arts Council, and $85 for the general public. They include transportation, and admission to the museum and the O’Keeffe exhibit. Tickets for the trip must be purchased in advance by 5pm on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017 – online at (www.yorkcountyarts.org), by phone at 803/328-2787, and in person at the Center for the Arts, 121 E. Main St., Rock Hill, SC. There will be time to shop and eat in Reynolda Village prior to the museum visit.

The Arts Council is headquartered in downtown Rock Hill, a state-recognized cultural district. For more information on Arts Council events, contact the Arts Council of York County at 803/328-2787, by e-mail at (arts@yorkcountyarts.org), or visit our webpage at (www.yorkcountyarts.org).

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Discover Old Fort, NC’s Artist Trail – Sept. 2-3, 2017

August 29, 2017

Discover the local artists in our Old Fort, NC, community on Sept. 2 – 3, 2017, from 10am-4pm

GPS or Google maps should easily give directions or you may call the location for details. There is a MAP at this link to all addresses below.

*Turtle Island Pottery – Maggie and Freeman Jones, Southern Highland Craft Guild members.
Located at 2782 Bat Cave Rd. 28762 . Functional and decorative stoneware pottery in Old Fort since 1984. We have a small gift for you and 10% off everything. Come on in and see what is under that blue roof!
For info call 828/337-0992.

*Anne Bevan – located at 84 Harlowe Noblitt Rd. 28762 Anne is known for her dynamic, large scale landscapes and peaceful, spiritual still life work. She has smaller paintings available, just as dynamic and is offering classes.
For info call 828/803-4858.
Susan Mace with her handmade cards and painted rocks and Treavor Gouge with his paintings on glass windows will be Anne’s guest artists.

*Susan Taylor – From the Heart Baskets. Located at 170 Olympic Dr. 28762. Susan Taylor’s studio, From the Heart Baskets, is located just three blocks off Bat Cave Road, and less than 2 miles from the I-40 Exit 73. A juried member of the Southern Highland Craft Guild, Susan is a fiber artist. Her interests include gourd crafting, wool felting, and bead stringing, in addition to basket making! Joining Susan for the Artist’s Trail will be John Roller, a wood turner. John’s expertise is making functional art from various domestic and tropical hardwoods. Please join Susan and John for a glass of tea and home-made cookies! Follow the signs.
For info call 828/668-9546.

*Pamela and Henry Harvey, Author and Sculptors. Located at 2946 Catawba River Rd. 28762. :
“We are located about 800 feet from the entrance to the falls. You’d be hard-put to miss us on Catawba. We have 12 acres, of which about 7 are dedicated as sculpture gardens. And there’s a 60 foot black schooner with wild sails overlooking everything. The “ship” is basically a staging area for bluegrass, concerts, etc. We just had our first “gig” about two weeks ago.”
For info call 828/668-1185.

*Donna Rohlf’s – Peace Patterns, located at 154 Brooke Lane 28762. Dr. Donna, PhD is, former 30 year holistic NYC psychotherapist and founder of a peace flag. In retirement she has morphed into a feng shui artist as well as a human design analyst and enthusiast. Donna Rohlf of (www.sashiflag.org) shares her outdoor Peace Pattern Studio on both 9/1 and 9/2 weather, permitting. Come join her for a cup of tea and possibly making your own family peace pattern. She will also have prints and cards handmade by Laura Elliott. Lee Entrekin of Dreamwind Flutes will have his beautiful wooden flutes on Sunday. Lee is a Southern Highland Craft Guild member.
It is 5 and ½ miles South of I-40 on Bat Cave Rd. Brooke Ln. is on the Left .3 miles past Bethlehem Rd. Tall Evergreens hide the road sign. Turn around at Crimson Rd. if you miss it.
For info call 828/668-0707.

*Grove Hill Pottery, located at 498 Greenlee Rd. 28762 Leslie Bradsher is on the other side of Old Fort, a few miles east on Hwy. 70, then Right onto Greenlee Rd. Her studio is at her families old farm with functional stoneware pottery.
For info call 828/925-1598.

Seagrove Potters in Seagrove, NC, Offers Stepping into the Craft Events During July 2017

June 22, 2017

Experience something new and adventurous as you spend a Saturday in Seagrove, NC. During the month of July 2017, the pottery shops in Seagrove have something planned each Saturday. Observe demonstrations of wheel turning, carving techniques, raku firing and much more. If you’ve been wanting to get your hands into some clay, this is your opportunity. You can participate in hands-on activities during this special month long event. Try making pottery on the wheel, learn a hand-building technique or make a pottery keepsake of your very own. The participating potters are willing to share behind the scenes activities, so you can join in the craft.

Stepping into the Craft – Saturdays in Seagrove, NC, will take place on July 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2017, from 10am – 5pm.

Each participating shop will share their own special style and have their own specific event. Each Saturday is different. For a list of participating shops and event schedules go to (https://discoverseagrove.com/saturdays-in-seagrove/). Print or download the detailed listing. Pickup an area map and guide at your first stop and have a fun Saturday in Seagrove.

Seagrove is in the central piedmont of North Carolina where more than 100 ceramic artists call home. Visitors can shop galleries and studios from the town’s center, extending to a 20-mile radius along the scenic NC Pottery Highway. Tour the Seagrove shops to experience the 200-year old pottery making tradition. The pottery shops of Seagrove are open year-round.

For further information visit (http://discoverseagrove.com/saturdays-in-seagrove/) or visit Facebook at (http://www.facebook.com/seagrovepotters).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC Adds Quilt Block #199

May 31, 2017

Driving down Sandy Springs Road in North West Anderson County, SC, through rolling farm land you will find Bruce and Toni Smith’s home. They have sponsored the 199th quilt location on the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC.

The Lone Star quilt block can be viewed on their barn at 1101 Sandy Springs Road. We asked the Smith’s how they selected this quilt for their barn. They said, “We were in the little Amish town of Bird in Hand, Pennsylvania, and went into a store that had quilts for sale. It was here that we were amazed with all the quilts to choose from but Toni couldn’t decide on one that she was really taken with. A young Amish girl suggested that we go out into the country side and find a lady that made quilts at her home and that she really did beautiful work. We did find her the next day and made a very satisfying purchase of this quilt at her home.” Mrs. Smith stated that she has always loved quilts and wanted a quilt for their home. She continues to use the Lone Star quilt to adorn their home and now their barn.

The Smith’s live on a farm that has been in Bruce’s’ family since 1949. His family moved to this farm the year he was born and still possess the wagon his father used to move the family to their new home. They have primarily been cattle farmers and continue to run a few head of cattle. They love the rolling hills and open spaces and have a lovely bed of roses.

Kimberly Wulfert, PhD, Quilt historian states in her article “The Lone Star Quilt Design Through Time” that, ”The Lone Star quilt block is likely one of the most recognizable quilt patterns to Americans. It is also one of the oldest patterns, along with the Mariner’s Compass, Orange Peel, Job’s Trouble and Irish chain. But this is a pattern known by many names. There are variations of it with 6 points, 8 points (the most common design) or even more…”. This old multi-pieced star block is known by many names. The Mathematical Star was an early name used in England and along the Eastern US seaboard, especially near Baltimore.

The Star of Bethlehem is a well-known name for it all around the country and is still used today. Other names for the same pattern are the Star of the East, Morning Star, which is what Native American’s call it, and Lone star, which is the name given to this pattern by Texan quilters because they are called the lone star state…The Amish liked the large central Star pattern, as did the southern states, across the US. The Central States made their fair share, but it seems more were made closer to the last quarter of the 19th century and in to the 20th century’s first two quarters.” Source: New Pathways Into Quilt History.

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).

Caldwell Arts Council is Calling for Artists in Caldwell County, NC, to Participate in Visual Artists Competition and Art Around Caldwell Studio Tour – Deadline May 27, 2017

May 10, 2017

The Caldwell Arts Council in Lenoir, NC, is pleased to announce the 41st Annual Caldwell Visual Artists Competition scheduled for June 2 – July 29, 2017. Sondra Dorn, a visual artist from Asheville NC, will judge the competition and cash prizes will be awarded.

This competition is open to 2-D (paintings, collage, etc.) and 3-D (pottery, small sculpture, etc.) visual artists 18 years of age or older who reside, work, attend school or take art classes in Caldwell County. Photography is excluded from this competition.

A non-refundable entry fee of $25 entitles each artist to display two works of art, to be delivered on either May 26th (9am-5pm) or May 27th (10am-2pm). Cash awards have been increased to include: Best in Show $350, 2nd Place $200, 3rd Place $150, People’s Choice $150, and up to three merit awards of $100 each.

Artists from Caldwell County and contiguous counties are also invited to open their home studios or set up in a local business in Caldwell County on Saturday, June 24th, 9am-4pm for the Art Around Ca;dwell Studio Tour. Artists participating in both events will receive recognition in the Caldwell Visual Artists Competition exhibit, and a discount on the entry fee for this studio tour.

All details on both events are available by calling the Caldwell Arts Council at 828/754-2486 or visiting the website at (www.caldwellarts.com).

The Caldwell Arts Council is located at 601 College Avenue, Lenoir, and open Tuesday-Friday 9am-5pm and Saturdays 10am-2pm.

2017 Ag + Art Tour of York County in Rock Hill, SC, Calls for Participation – Deadline April 21, 2017

April 4, 2017

In partnership with the Arts Council of York County, the Ag + Art Tour is now accepting applications for artists and artisans interested in participating in the 2017 Ag + Art Tour of York County, SC, on Saturday, June 10 and Sunday, June 11, 2017. For this program, artists and artisans are defined as individuals who make handcrafted products without the use of kits or commercial models, and whose primary components are not manufactured. Examples include but are not limited to: painters, potters, weavers, quilters, jewelers, acoustic musicians, and artisan bakers. Storytellers and musicians may also apply to be considered. Those selected to participate in the Tour will be located at Farm Sites and can sell their products.

Artisans are encouraged to participate in their home county of residence. Artisans can participate on different weekends but must complete a separate application for each county/weekend. There is no fee to participate. Artists and artisans may apply online at (http://www.agandarttour.com/artisans). Artisans whose applications are received after Friday, April 21, 2017 will not be included on printed materials; however, they will be listed on (www.AgAndArtTour.com).

The South Carolina Ag + Art Tour is the nation’s largest free, self- guided tour of farms featuring local artisans and farmer’s markets. Set to take place at local farms and farm stands in 11 counties across South Carolina – Chester, Chesterfield, Darlington, Fairfield, Florence, Horry, Kershaw, Lancaster, Newberry, Union and York Counties, visitors have the chance to see first-hand where their food comes from, watch artists in action, purchase homemade and homegrown goods, and learn more about rural life. The Tour will be held each weekend in June, on Saturday, from 9am-5pm, and from 1-5pm on Sunday. Different counties are participating each weekend, giving visitors the opportunity to explore more farms and farm stands across the state.

The first Ag + Art Tour started in 2012 in York County to bring together agriculture and art. York County hosted close to 3,000 visitors during the inaugural year. The Tour expanded to include Lancaster County in 2013 with 6,000 total visitors, and added its third and fourth counties to include Chester and Fairfield in 2014 with a total of 8,000 attendees for the entire tour. In 2015, the Tour welcomed its fifth county – Union. Chesterfield, Darlington, and Horry Counties joined the Tour in 2016, and in 2017, the Tour added Florence and Newberry Counties, bringing the total number of participating counties to eleven. Overall, the Tour has seen over 20,000 visitors since launching in 2012.

The Tour is coordinated by a leadership team and county-level planning teams that are coordinated by the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service and the Olde English District Tourism Commission. Partner organizations include economic development, chamber of commerce, tourism bureau, farm and artisan organizations, education and extension office, arts councils and community volunteers.

Support for this project is provided by York Electric Cooperative, Inc., the SC Arts Commission (which receives funding from the NEA), Rock Hill Accommodations Tax/Tourism Commission, York County Hospitality Tax, the ACYC’s Annual Campaign and Small Grants Program, and the John and Susan Bennet Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of SC.

For more information on the South Carolina Ag + Art Tour, please contact Ben Boyles at 803/981-3021 or visit (www.AgAndArtTour.com) for details. Artists and artisans seeking more information about participating in the Ag + Art Tour of York County should contact Stephanie Castaldo by e-mail at (scastaldo@yorkcountyarts.org) or call 803/328-2787.

Upstate (SC) Heritage Quilt Trail Presents 193rd Quilt Block “Ode to Dave”

March 18, 2017

David and Diane Schonauer have added another quilt block to their 1892 Victorian house located at 707 West Market Street in the Westside Historic District in the city of Anderson, SC. The name of this pattern is Railroad Crossing.

Diane took several quilting classes in an adult continuing education program when I lived in Illinois. Each class offered a new pattern, making full size quilt tops. Since she did not have a lot of fabric at the time, nor the need for so many large quilt tops, she miniaturized each pattern the teacher gave them. The quilt is no exception in that the strips only measure ½” by 1 1/2”, and the overall quilt is 17 inches square. It was the first quilt Diane made “on point”. The backing fabric depicts old fashioned locomotives.

She named the quilt “Ode to Dave” in honor of her husband, David Schonauer. “We both worked for Electro-Motive Division of General Motors Corporation, where we helped produce diesel electric locomotives. Dave spent his 31 year working career there, holding a variety of management level positions, including running the Aftermarket Business Unit and overseeing the installation of the SAP computer system.”

For further information visit (www.uhqt.org).

Mint Museum Uptown in Charlotte, NC, Offers Women2Women Museum Experience

December 6, 2016

mint-museum-teal-diamond-logo

Round up your network and join us for a Women2Women Museum Experience! Discover the compelling life stories of women artists, experience a private tour of “Women of Abstract Expressionism” and “Fired Up”, and enjoy refreshments.

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Work by Perle Fine

This two-hour program is available for reservations on Wednesdays-Fridays December – February from noon-2pm or 4-6pm at #themintmuseum Uptown. $40 per person; maximum group size is 12. Book your group today by contacting Julie Olson Anna at 704/337-2043 or e-mail to (Julie.OlsonAnna@mintmuseum.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail Expands in Seneca, SC

November 11, 2016

upstate-heritage-quilt-trail

A new quilt block (#188) has been installed on the shores of Lake Hartwell, on the wood-working shop of Jere duBois at 880 Cartee Road, south of Seneca, SC. The original quilter is the accomplished Joy duBois, whose workshop lies in the walkout basement of their beautiful retirement home. Her quilts decorate every room of the spacious home and are a sight to see and enjoy.

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Joy duBois relates that her husband has always hankered after a Mariner’s Compass, but for years she told him, “No, that’s too hard.” Not after she took a class at Heirlooms and Comforts with her friend, Judy Lardiere. They did their first paper piecing and each of them made a beautiful Mariner’s Compass quilt. Joy gave hers to Jere for his birthday.

duBois is now hooked on piecing, and applique, and color selection, and 1930s reproduction fabrics! Sounds like a quilter. Visiting her workspace is a delight to the eyes, with many quilts in various stages of production.

Moving south from St. Charles, IL, forty-seven years ago, Joy and Jere opened a convenience store on Old Clemson Highway in what is now a fraternity house. They lived upstairs, while Joy ran the business and Jere worked as a real estate broker for Coldwell-Banker, where he continues to be employed. After moving to South Carolina, Joy decided to make a quilt for her daughter from old dresses she wore as a child. She planned to gift the quilt to her for her high school graduation, but shares that it was actually completed for her graduation from university. She did discover the Heirlooms and Comforts Quilt Shop during that time, and took many classes there throughout the years.

duBois has been an inspiration to the Trail. You can see reproductions of her beautiful quilting at Six Mile Park. She and Sue Hackett produced #171, Quilted Tulips and soon to be added Gardener’s Delight. Joy has worked with many quilters in the area. A technique she and Gail Sexton learned together will be added soon at the City of Pickens Chamber of Commerce, and who knows where next? We have plans!

For more information on the history of the Mariner’s Compass pattern, refer to quilt #67 on the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail web site at (www.uhqt.org).

Take a Tour of Grovewood Studios in Asheville, NC – July 16, Aug. 20 & Oct. 8, 2016

June 7, 2016

There will be 3 more opportunities in 2016 – July 16, Aug. 20 and again on Oct. 8 – to tour Grovewood Studios, a group of 9 workshops occupied by 12 artists who work across mediums, located on the historic Grovewood grounds adjacent to the Omni Grove Park Inn in Asheville, NC. Tours are free and self­-guided and will take place from 11am – 4pm on all 3 dates. We will also offer 6 tour dates in 2017.

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Chris Abell specializes in Boehm system wooden flutes, headjoints and whistles – handmade in Grenadilla and sterling silver.

Grovewood Studios and Grovewood Gallery have a rich craft history. Both are housed in the former weaving and woodworking complex of Biltmore Industries, built during 1917 – 1924 by The Grove Park Inn’s architect, Fred Loring Seely. Remnants from this Arts & Crafts enterprise can still be found throughout Grovewood, and the buildings bear the marks of the craftspeople who worked here a lifetime ago. In its heyday, Biltmore Industries had a total of 40 looms in steady operation, producing some of the highest quality homespun fabric in the country ­ worn  by US Presidents, First Ladies, movie stars, and sports figures.

For further info call 828/253-7651 or visit (www.grovewood.com).