Archive for the ‘Quilts’ Category

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Offers Studio Update

October 6, 2017

It’s been a busy summer for the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail (UHQT). We have opened a new studio in Pickens County at the Holly Springs Center and moved the Walhalla studio to the former Oakway Intermediate School in Westminster. The Anderson studio is still located at the Anderson Arts Center. All the studios are integral components of the UHQT and production of quilt panels. All our production teams are hard at work and looking forward to a busy fall and winter. Direct communication links are highlighted.

Anderson County
110 Federal Street, Anderson
Painting studio located in the Old Carnegie Library Basement
Hours: Fridays 9:30 – Noon
Contact: Diane Schonauer by calling 864/231-9317

Oconee County
150 Schoolhouse Road, Westminster, former Oakway Intermediate School
Hours: Tuesday and Thursday, from 9:30 – Noon
Contact: Chris Troy by calling 864/985-1096

Pickens County
Holly Springs Center
120 Holly Springs School Road, Pickens, Room #110
Hours: Thursday and First and Third Saturdays, from 10:00 -2:00. Check Face Book for updates Holly Springs Center Quilt Painting Group
Contact: Cindy Blair by calling 864/973-3921

Visit our Face Book page for production updates and news. Please contact us at 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

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Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail of South Carolina to Honor Lucy Harward as the 2017 UHQT Quilter of the Year in Pickens, SC – Oct. 6, 2017

September 29, 2017

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail of South Carolina is pleased to announce a reception to honor Lucy Harward of Pickens, SC, as the 2017 UHQT Quilter of the Year. The Quilter of the Year Program was initiated in 2010 to recognize a quilter who has provided community service and leadership through their quilting. The UHQT receives much support from the quilting community, it is our way to say thank you to artists who provide service to their community.


Lucy Harward and her husband Dale.

The public is cordially invited to the Pickens Community Center in Pickens, SC, at 10am on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017, to celebrate Harward’s many contributions to the community. There will be an exhibition of some of her quilts, in the Granger Fiber Arts Room of the Center. Refreshments will be provided in the Jack Black Room by the UHQT and the Pickens Senior Center. Three of the quilts from the trail that Harward created will be on display in the Jack Black Room. Tours of the facility and its collection of fiber arts and antique sewing items will be available.

Lucy Harward is the driving force of the Granger Fabric Arts room at the Community Center in the City of Pickens. She resides, with her husband Dale, on a beautiful farm, located halfway between Pickens and Pumpkintown. She is a life-long seamstress, completing her first dress at nine years of age, with, as she says, “a zipper down the back.” Harward began quilting approximately 30 years ago when she and Dale lived in Winter Garden, FL. She was taking classes in a shop on tailoring and dressmaking and admired the quilts displayed there. The rest is history, as they say!

Upon retirement 18 years ago, she and Dale moved back to Pickens where Harward grew up and attended her daddy’s church, Grace Methodist, went to school at Pickens Junior & Senior High, and walked down the old Doodle Trail with her friend Jane Eckman so many years ago.
Harward is also a long time member and past president of the UpCountry Quilt Guild. Her many accomplishments include fund raising and grant writing for the Pickens Community Center and the Hagood Auditorium, weekly volunteering and serving on the board of Canon Hospital, volunteer coordinator for Meals on Wheels and developing a variety of ministries and outreach throughout the county. She shares her expertise with any learners who come her way, creating a plethora of classes in the fiber arts.

As Harward states, “I help people achieve things that they would like to achieve!”

For further information call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in SC, Adds New Quilt Block

August 30, 2017

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in SC, continues to grow as a destination for travelers interested in quilts, barns, outdoor art and the history of the Upstate.

Heidi Wolko, a renowned quilter whose creations have been exhibited at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, Kentucky told us that this work was “one of 31 pieces from three different art quilt groups. They were all part of the Everchanging River that Bonnie Ouellette, our “Thread Heads Mother”, had dreamt up. Needless to say, all of us felt extremely honored about the invitation from the museum to exhibit after the “River” had traveled around the U.S. for about three years. Following the exhibit at the museum, the “River” made one more long trip – to Taiwan – until the individual pieces were returned to their creators.”

Her quilt, “Illusion”, is the two hundredth two addition to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail. The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail sponsored this quilt for the Anderson Arts Center and it will join the other painted art quilt already on display at the Art Center Building located at 110 W. Federal Street, Anderson, South Carolina. The inspiration fabric quilt was shown along with another of Ms. Wolko’s quilts at the Double Illusions show sponsored by the Anderson Arts Center in 2015. Attendees at the show cast their votes for the quilt they thought should be added to the Arts Center building. The Illusion quilt had been displayed in Wolko’s Fair Play, SC home but after its selection for the UHQT, Ms. Wolko donated the quilt for an auction to benefit the Arts Center.

Wolko is a self-taught quilter who designed and made this quilt in 2008. The quilt was inspired by the book Blockbender Quilts written by Margaret J. Miller. This book encouraged Wolko to experiment with color. Wolko is a fiber artist whose use of texture, color and design has made a name for herself in the quilting community. She is the recipient of several quilting awards and continues to share her ideas and encouragement with other quilters. “One thing is for sure – I certainly LOVE color.” Images of some of her creations can be found by Googling Heidi Wolko.

For further info call 864/723-6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC Installs Quilt Block #200 and #201

June 12, 2017

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC celebrated its 200th quilt square, To the Mountains, at the Greater Pickens Chamber of Commerce at 222 W. Main St. in Pickens, SC. For eight years, the Quilt Trail has grown, block by block, into a meaningful part of Upstate South Carolina’s landscape for locals who want to preserve the history and traditions of the area. While the Quilt Trail is built, perpetuated, and maintained by locals with a passion for their history, it is also a unique experience for visitors to the area. The Trail appeals to those who enjoy art, nature, history, crafting, story-telling, and even just taking a car ride through the countryside.

As the UHQT has grown over the years, it has forged a path through the lives of so many in its surrounding communities. The members of the Trail are comprised of people who have had the tradition of quilting passed down to them, those whose created the tradition for themselves, and those who are not quilters but still help make the trail possible in various ways. There are now two teams of over 20 volunteers in Anderson and Oconee Counties and soon Pickens County who contribute over 7,000 hours per year giving presentations, painting quilt squares with members of the community, and finding ways to improve and promote this priceless resource. This art form has woven its way into the hearts of this community and beyond.

The original quilt, To the Mountains, a small landscape piece, was created by Joy duBois of Seneca. Joy met a quilter by the name of Gail Sexton, at the Upcountry Quilters Guild which meets at the Pickens Presbyterian Church in Pickens. Joy subsequently took a class that Gail was teaching in a new landscaping technique at the former local quilt shop, Heirlooms and Comforts. She enjoyed the class and the teacher so much that she went on meeting Gail for weekly sessions where they quilted together. Joy has many quilts in her “stash,” both landscape and appliqued borders that Gail designed and Joy has hand quilted.

When it came time to choose the quilt to adorn the Greater Chamber of Commerce building for the 200th block installment, this landscape quilt of mountains, rivers and a foreground of flowers and a tree was chosen from a group beautiful little landscape quilts by Kimberly Smagala, a life-long friend of Joy’s as well as the newest Chamber Executive Director.

For Kim and Joy, it all began 30 years ago. “My family moved from Texas when I was 5 years old and my baby quilt had shouldered a lot of love and use. My mother started working in a real estate with Jere, Joy’s husband. That is when we first met she mended and refurbished my quilt several times for me as I grew up. Joy has made myself, my mother, and my children many quilts throughout the years, including baby quilts. She and her husband are like family. ”

“The chamber office is the first stop for many visitors who visit our city. It is our hope to highlight more quilts throughout the Main Street corridor and around town as a part of a walking/bike tour. Quilting is part of our rich heritage and we are surrounded by so many talented quilters locally, especially those from the Upcountry Quilters’ Guild. We look forward to not only seeing more renderings of these beautiful quilts throughout downtown Pickens, but also creating a destination spot similar to what Landrum and Westminster, SC have accomplished.”

“A quilt warms the body and the soul, having this remarkable painted quilt panel by these talented artists portraying the beautiful craftsmanship that Joy put into this piece is amazing,” stated Smagala. This quilt panel was funded through the Pickens County ATAX Commission to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail.

201st UHQT Quilt The Cross

The Cross quilt is the 201st quilt added to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail. It is displayed on the Westminster Baptist Church, 212 East Windsor in Westminster, SC. The painted quilt block was sponsored by members of the Westminster Baptist Church. The Cross quilt block was designed by Janet Houts and taught during a quilting retreat at Kanuga Episcopal Camp in Hendersonville, NC attended by Paige Price and Denise McCormick.

Paige and Denise knew it would be perfect for their church and fellow quilters, Deanna DeFoor and Beckie DeFoor. Together they joined efforts and worked to piece and quilt a wall hanging, measuring 30 inches by 42 inches, as a gift to the members of the congregation. It was first displayed in the church on Easter Sunday, 2015. Several member of the church helped to paint the quilt block and it was presented to the congregation on Easter Sunday 2017. Being on the quilt trail allows everyone who passes by to enjoy the beauty of the fabric and painted quilts.

The cross is a Christian symbol that represents Jesus’s victory over sin and death. We are reminded about God and His plan of redemption through the symbolic significance of colors in the Bible. The two main colors of Westminster Baptist Church quilt are blue and gold. Blue is the color of the sky and a reminder of the heavenly realm. It also signifies the Healing Power of God. Gold represents God’s love because His love is more precious and more valuable than all the gold in the world. Love is the gold of God.

Westminster Baptist Church has been in the heart of town for more than 130 years. In the 1870’s, the town of Westminster, named after the original church located in a log building situated on the site of the Westminster First Baptist Church, grew up along the railroad and soon developed into a bustling business area. As the population shifted more toward the commercial area, some members of the church decided to build a church nearer the center of town. In 1884, they established a church ‘in the heart of town’. Now, more than 130 years later, the motto “In the heart of town, with a heart for the people” is still a principle held by its members. Located on E. Windsor Street, the church strives “to reach and develop devoted followers of Jesus Christ who love Him, grow in Him, and serve others in His name.”

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Adds Three New Quilt Blocks

April 27, 2017

# 196 “The Together Tree” and #197 “Star of Leadership”

The first two quilts displayed on Pickens County schools can be found at West End Elementary School on Pelzer Highway, just south of Route 123 as you enter Easley, SC, from the west. They are funded by the school and are the brainchildren of the principal, Angie Rodgers. Resident art teacher, Christina Covington’s 4th grade art students participated in the painting of both “Star of Leadership” and “The Together Tree.” The students also submitted names for the two squares, which were then selected by vote. Covington also was involved in painting, taking time off from her Christmas holiday to come to the Walhalla, SC, studio to paint the geometric details of the background in the “Star of Leadership” quilt square.

“The Together Tree” is based originally on an art project designed by a former art teacher, Erin Murphy, at the school. This framed painting hangs in the front entrance of the school and is decorated with the fingerprints of students and teachers at West End. “The fingerprints symbolize that we are all part of something bigger and how we all work together in our own unique and special ways,” states Covington.

The original quilts were also the inspiration of West End’s current principal, Angie Rodgers, who asked a group of quilters, mostly made up of retired West End teachers, to design and sew two hanging quilt squares for the school to display on the walls. Members of this quilting circle meet weekly to sew and also take sewing trips together. The group started approximately eight years ago and includes; Gail King, Janet Hadaway, Kathy Peot, Beth Holcombe and Paula Grant. King and Hadaway were former 4th grade teachers and Holcombe taught 5th grade. Peot is a retired nurse, but is also the mom of former West End students! Grant, a retired 5th grade Science teacher and the youngest of the quilters has recently retired from West End and can now participate fully in the fun.

“The Together Tree”, designed by Janet Hadaway, depicts a tree, surrounded by an appliqued window frame and decorated with actual buttons on a raindrop printed background. This quilt celebrates the diversity of West End as well as the many students who have come and gone through the school.

The “Star of Leadership”, also created as a quilted wall hanging was designed by Beth Holcombe. This block is a variation of the traditional “Star of the Alamo” block pattern. It was inspired by the bright, primary colored blocks in the tiled floors of the hallways of the school, especially where the halls meet at an intersection. This pattern was chosen for its likeness to a compass, directing students to move forward to reach their goals.

The two quilt squares are mounted in front of the school, on a brick marquee, formerly used for school signage and the fabric quilts will be displayed in the school building.

Quilt block #198 has been added to the array of quilts in Anderson, SC

Reagan Smith of 26 Oleander Drive selected a “LeMoyne Star” for placement on her backyard fence. Lystra Seymour from Anderson, SC, made the fabric quilt Smith told us:

“Mrs. Seymour husband is a physician that I call on and he proudly displays his wife’s quilts in his office waiting room as well as his patient rooms….this particular quilt happened to be in his back patient room several years ago when it truly caught my eye… knew that with its simplistic design and bold colors that this was the quilt block design I wanted!”

“This eight point star has many names ‘LeMoyne Star’, ‘Puritan Star’ and ‘Lemon Star’ to name a few. There are several theories on who created this pattern. One theory is that the LeMoyne brothers Pierre and Jean Baptist who founded New Orleans had this particular star pattern prominent in Jean Baptiste’s coat of arms. The earliest published date of the ‘LeMoyne Star’ is in a collection of patterns attributed to Joseph Doyle in 1911, according to Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of ‘Pieced Quilt Patterns’. The configuration falls into the category of ‘Eight-pointed/45 degree Diamond Stars’. Doyle called this pattern ‘Puritan Star’ as the design traveled throughout the country the name became corrupted into ‘Lemon Star’.”

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail visit (www.uhqt.org).

Where the Trail Will Lead: The 200th Quilt Square on the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail

April 3, 2017

by Victoria Hurst

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail, in Upstate, SC, is celebrating its 200th quilt square at the Greater Pickens Chamber of Commerce on April 7, 2017, at 12:30pm. For eight years, the Quilt Trail has grown, block by block, into a meaningful part of Upstate South Carolina’s landscape for locals who want to preserve the history and traditions of the area. While the Quilt Trail is built, perpetuated, and maintained by locals with a passion for their history, it is also a unique experience for visitors to the area. The Trail appeals to those who enjoy art, nature, history, crafting, story-telling, and even just taking a car ride through the countryside
.
As the UHQT has grown over the years, it has forged a path through the lives of so many in its surrounding communities. The members of the Trail are comprised of people who have had the tradition of quilting passed down to them, those whose created the tradition for themselves, and those who are not quilters but still help make the trail possible in various ways. There are now two teams of over 20 volunteers in Anderson and Oconee Counties. This art form has woven its way into the hearts of this community.

Martha File is the one of the founding members of the trail and continues to work with the UHQT from her current home in Athens, OH. Martha was living in Seneca, SC, when she began working with the Quilt Trail and usually comes back to her home in Seneca for a week or two every month. Her favorite square is mounted there, which is based on a quilt made by her aunt. Martha is passionate about organizations that promote community service and fellowship, and “the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail would not be where it is today without all the community support it has received. This is truly a collaborative effort by many organizations, businesses and individuals in Anderson, Oconee and Pickens Counties. Some of our quilts have been painted by students in the schools, community groups, families, as well as by our volunteers.” Martha has been on this journey since 2009 and has watched as quilt squares have been added to homes, historic buildings, destination venues, and businesses in the Upstate.

Nancy Warmath, who lives outside of Seneca, had both a grandmother and mother who quilted, and she has a quilt that her mother made at the age of 12. She also has a quilt square above her mailbox, #139 “Dogwood Quilt,” based on one of her grandmother’s. Nancy is in the process of making a quilt herself for the first time in 30-something years. After getting involved through Gil Huggins on the Walhalla production team, she has worked on painting several of the quilt squares, beginning with #80, “Wedding Ring” in Central. She also did work on the 200th Quilt, which will be unveiled April 7th. She loves the stories behind the quilts and hopes to see wider promotion of the trail, as it brings more visitors to our area and inspires residents to learn more about their heritage.

One resident of Seneca, Lyn Geibens, has a quilt square on her home (quilted by Gil Huggins) and got involved in the quilt trail through her friend, Jane Bolling. Lyn and Jane worked with the students at Keowee Elementary School to paint their quilt square, #10 “Compass Rose”, and recalls how proud the students were to write their names on the back of what they helped create. Lyn also finds it gratifying to work with a group of “strong willed woman…there is very little criticism and loads of encouragement.”

Oconee County Production Team Leader Chris Troy is an artist based in Bountyland, between Seneca and Walhalla. She also has a quilt square on her house, which represents the first and only quilt that she actually created herself. While Chris’s medium of choice is ceramics rather than textiles, she really values being involved in the UHQT and says “the hands on, face to face interaction of people of diverse backgrounds coming together for the purpose of creating public art has always been a positive endeavor.”

Jim and Barbara Schoonover of Wynward Point in Salem are a husband/wife duo that have been involved with the UHQT since 2009. Barbara is a quilter, and she is on the production team for painting the quilt patterns. Jim cuts the board, paints the primer, and draws the patterns. At this time, he holds the title of only man on the team. He and Barbara both enjoy working with an organization that they see as a great asset to the community and a great “way to connect with locals who have grown up here and those who have moved to this area for the beauty of the Upstate.”

Abby Heid is another resident of Seneca, SC, who finds a strong sense of identity and community from being involved in UHQT: “The people who participate in the UHQT have a strong camaraderie…[they] bring together their individual skill sets with each new quilt project. The talents of artists, quilters, crafters, and those who want to learn come together to turn someone’s hand or machine-sewn quilt into a fantastic work of art. The teamwork is amazing. It is the people, who come weekly to the studio and contribute their talents, laughter, and chatter that make you feel welcomed and come back to learn more.”

The members of the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail put in over 7,000 volunteer hours per year, giving presentations, painting quilt squares with members of the community, and finding ways to improve and promote this priceless resource. As these proud members reveal their 200th milestone along a winding, scenic, and sometimes uphill road, they also have announcements about how this project will continue to grow and reach even more people across the region and beyond. Join the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail at the Pickens Chamber of Commerce at 222 W. Main St. in Pickens, SC on April 7th at 12:30pm to see where the trail will lead!

Victoria Hurst is a writer, traveler and Clemson native who is now based in Charleston, SC.

For further information visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate (SC) Heritage Quilt Trail Presents 193rd Quilt Block “Ode to Dave”

March 18, 2017

David and Diane Schonauer have added another quilt block to their 1892 Victorian house located at 707 West Market Street in the Westside Historic District in the city of Anderson, SC. The name of this pattern is Railroad Crossing.

Diane took several quilting classes in an adult continuing education program when I lived in Illinois. Each class offered a new pattern, making full size quilt tops. Since she did not have a lot of fabric at the time, nor the need for so many large quilt tops, she miniaturized each pattern the teacher gave them. The quilt is no exception in that the strips only measure ½” by 1 1/2”, and the overall quilt is 17 inches square. It was the first quilt Diane made “on point”. The backing fabric depicts old fashioned locomotives.

She named the quilt “Ode to Dave” in honor of her husband, David Schonauer. “We both worked for Electro-Motive Division of General Motors Corporation, where we helped produce diesel electric locomotives. Dave spent his 31 year working career there, holding a variety of management level positions, including running the Aftermarket Business Unit and overseeing the installation of the SAP computer system.”

For further information visit (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate. SC, Expands by Two

October 28, 2016

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The 186th quilt panel was recently added to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail at the home of Billy and Thelma Burton, 899 Rocky Fork Road Westminster, SC. The Cathedral Window quilt was the final quilt Thelma’s mother, Henry Louie Green Powell, worked on before her death and remains unfinished. Thelma recalls from her childhood Sarah Hunt and her mother putting a quilt on the backs of old straight chairs, laying the frames across them. She says, “They would work for days. The old shell design was the one she liked to use. Using chalk, she would make the shell pattern.” This was where Thelma learned to quilt, making two quilts herself before she was married to Billy L. Burton fifty years ago.

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Thelma Burton with her mother’s quilt beside the painted quilt panel.

A Cathedral Window quilt is not strictly a traditional quilt. It doesn’t have the usual sandwich of three layers of fabric and batting, but is composed of folded squares of fabric, whip-stitched together into the “frames.” The “panes” are traditionally made from muslin or cheesecloth squares to create a translucent effect as they are appliqued over the joins, inside those graceful curves that must be what Thelma saw as shells when she was a child.

Blogger at (annquiltsblog.com) describes the process as “being similar to the folded paper fortune tellers my friends and I made ad infinitum when we 8 or 9 years old. Does anyone remember recess on sunny afternoons, choosing numbers and colors, then getting a funny fortune?”

Great cathedral windows have been an inspiration to countless people for centuries. It’s always a gift to have some of the emotions, memories and ideas of great art, such as a glowing church window in our daily lives.

The 187th addition to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Westminster, SC, was installed on the barn door of the property owned by Joe & Sharon Byers on 418 Cornelia Avenue. Joe and Sharon come from quilting-rich backgrounds, respectively relocating from Pennsylvania and Michigan to the upstate of SC. The square was painted by their two daughters, Heather and Hadassa, along with young neighborhood friends of long standing, Savannah, Whitney and Jordan Wingert. The young people took time off from their summer activities to come to the studio in Walhalla and complete the block under the guidance of the production team. Joe, a carpenter and independent contractor, designed and built a beautiful wooden frame for the block, to give it a bit more presence on his barn.

1016-187-quilt

The original design was created by the Arts Council of York County, (www.yorkcountyarts.org) and serves as their logo. They also have a painted panel which is displayed on their Arts Center as part of the York County Quilt Trail in Rock Hill, SC. The style and design of this quilt is a variation of the Cathedral Window quilt block.

The fabric quilt was commissioned by Cindy Blair to meet the requirement of the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail that there be an actual, hand-made quilt block. It was sewn by Mary Dee Rudy of Seneca, a prolific quilter and member of the Walhalla Production Team. It was donated by Cindy Blair to the UHQT and will be showcased at the production team’s studio.

For further information visit their website at (www.uhqt.org).

Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Names 2016 Quilter of the Year – Diane Schonauer

September 30, 2016

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The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate SC is pleased to announce the selection of Diane Schonauer from Anderson, SC, as the 2016 Quilter of the Year. This award recognizes a local quilter who provides leadership and community service through their quilting.

Schonauer will be recognized at the Fall Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail Meeting on Oct. 7, 2016. in the first floor conference room at the Anderson County Public Library located at 300 N. McDuffie Street. The public is invited to attend the reception from 3-5:30pm. Quilts made by Schonauer will be displayed in the lobby windows for the month of October.

Schonauer has made many contributions to Anderson County and the State of South Carolina through her leadership and volunteer efforts with Quilters of South Carolina; Anderson Quilters Guilds in leadership positions and making charity quilts for donation through the Guilds many programs. In addition she is the Anderson production team leader for the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail. Schonauer is always willing to help area school students learn about quilting and painting a block for their school or helping the students make the fabric quilt. Schonauer promotes quilting through demonstrations, educational programs and enthusiastic leadership.

“I started this quilt in a class in Illinois in 1998 at a shop called Pieceful Hearts. Sara Nephew’s construction method eliminates the challenging ‘Y seam’. Each block contains two 60 degree diamonds and four 60 degree triangles, the two triangles in the ‘medium position’ are matching fabric,” say Schonauer.

“My mother had started a few quilts, among them Cathedral Window and Log Cabin, before 3 daughters and full time employment stopped her from completing them. I loved seeing these pieces as a young child and consequently have always liked quilts.”

“My sister, Linda Lilly, actually taught me how to sew. She made all of our clothes from the time I was 10 through my high school years. She is a very accomplished seamstress and has a degree in clothing and textiles. In the 1980’s Linda and I took a quilting class at Katie’s Calico Corners. I was hooked; Linda has not ever quilted again! In the early 1990’s, quilting classes were offered as an adult continuing education program and I signed up for the very first one. I have been quilting ever since,” say Schonauer.

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail call 864/723- 6603 or visit (www.uhqt.org).

The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail in Upstate, SC, Adds Two New Quilt Blocks to Their Trail

August 29, 2016

upstate-heritage-quilt-trail

183 Blue Heron

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The Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail, (Oconee, Pickens and Anderson Counties in SC) is pleased to announce the Blue Heron quilt block, created by their 2015 Quilter of the Year, Penny Little of Salem, SC. The Quilter of the Year award was created to honor quilters who not only are talented artists, but also give back to their communities in very meaningful ways.

Little is a member of the Lake and Mountain Quilters’ Guild making charity quilts for donation through the Guild programs and helping with a variety of Guild activities and programs. She leads the Hi-Fiber Art Quilters. She donates her time and expertise to the Tamassee DAR School, where she teaches sewing and quilting to aspiring young people on a weekly basis. She has been active in supporting the Oconee Animal Shelter making pet beds. Little has taught many classes for the OLLI program at Clemson University and done classes and demonstrations of her skills at Blue Ridge Arts Council and Locker Hooking at a Quilters of SC retreat.

Her quilts have won numerous awards in local and regional venues as well as national and international competitions. Her accomplishments in the world of art quilters is impressive. “African Bride,” has won first place at the 2006 Lake and Mountain Quilters Guild show and was also a semi-finalist at both the International Quilt Association’s Houston show and the American Quilters Society show in Paducah, KY, that same year. In 2012, “Numida I” took 3rd place at the Lake and Mountain Quilters Guild show and was also a semi-finalist at Paducah. “Reflections of Africa” was a semi-finalist at two AQS shows in 2014 as well as taking second place at the Lake and Mountain Quilters Guild show. These are just a few of her many awards in competition. She has also had a number of one-woman exhibits throughout the upstate.

Little was born in Detroit, MI, attended Eastern Michigan University, is the mother of three sons, two daughters-in-law and six grandchildren. She and her husband lived in several states and Tokyo, Japan. She is a retired travel agent and enjoys the good life living on Lake Keowee near Seneca, SC. As a young child, she can remember cutting up clothes and hand stitching the fabric into doll clothes or turning cardboard into little houses or villages. Later she made clothes, upholstered furniture, macramé or any craft that was popular. This quilter’s story started in 1994 when she was introduced to the world of quilt making and found her true passion. Her first quilt took two years, a block a month for twelve months followed by hand quilting for another twelve months. After joining quilt guilds, reading books, and attending workshops she became an adequate quilter. Although traditional quilts were useful, for Penny they were monotonous to make. That all changed when she discovered art quilts. The guideline for designing quilts is “there are no rules”. A typical quilt of Little’s may have an African theme, be made entirely from scraps, have no straight lines only curves or a focal point or embellishing from beads to seeds. The fabrics are frequently batik or her own hand dyed fabric.

When designing a quilt, ideas and color are the most difficult for her, she relates. Inspiration comes from fabric, workshops, travel, and books. Fabrics depicting African animals have inspired several of her quilts since her first trip to Kenya in 1995, second trip to Tanzania in 2006 and last trip to Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe in 2011.

Little says, “A really fabulous day for me is quilting in my studio. I never lack for something inspiring to work on, talk about, design or get excited about. I enjoy teaching quilting to children and sharing my skills with others. In 2015 I was honored as Quilter of the year by the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail. I was given a quilt block to be painted featuring a quilt made by me. I decided to donate the quilt block to the Lake Keowee community to honor quilters and artist. The great Blue Heron, which was inspired by Toni Whitney, seemed perfect for the lake community. The Heron took days and days to cut feathers and fused together and sew the edges.” The quilt was made by using hand dyed fabrics and batiks.

Toni Whitney, of Big Fork, MT, is the designer of the Blue Heron pattern. While pursuing a career as a wildlife painter, Whitney discovered the art of fusible applique in 2005. From her website (www.toniwhitney.com), “dabbling in textiles proved to be a thrilling experience that merged easily and effortlessly with painting…this medium seems to come hand in hand with the nicest group of people I have ever had the pleasure to meet, Quilters!”

When asked about the inspiration for the Blue Heron pattern, Whitney responded, “I live outside of a very small town in NW Montana in a heavily forested area. While I knew there were great blue heron in these parts it was a rarity to actually see one, I myself never had. I was thinking of my sister one morning and feeling particularly blue. She had passed suddenly many years ago with reasons never fully explained and finding closure for myself proved difficult. On this day of remorseful pondering I happened to look out of my window to see a beautiful great blue heron staring right back at me as if I were the oddest thing it had ever seen, perched, if you will, directly on top of a balsam fir just as comfortably as a chickadee, the top of the tree bent almost in half from the weight.

“Every morning for a few weeks following that day I would happen to look up at just the right moment to the bird, gliding low, silent and graceful over me,” said Whitney. “The peacefulness of witnessing such a large creature somehow effortlessly and quietly making its way through life out here in this wilderness which seems much too harsh for such a delicate creature somehow eased my soul and reminded me to take things lightly, try to live gracefully regardless of where I’m at and if I’m in a precarious place that I feel could snap at any moment sending me hurtling down to a horribly painful experience, I have but to lift my spirits and fly.”

The Keowee Fire Commission has unanimously agreed to display the quilt on the station on Highway 130, just north of Route 183. Rich Caudill, chief of the station explained the Keowee Fire Commission was established in 1993 as a fire tax district by the community and covers a service area of 30 square miles. This encompasses the Duke Energy facility, the lake communities of Waterford, Wynward, Waterside, Keowee Harbors and Keowee Key. The current station was built in 2008.

Little resides in the Keowee Key community on Lake Keowee in the upstate of South Carolina. In her usual selfless fashion, she has dedicated her award, the Blue Heron quilt square for community display and the fabric quilt that she beautifully crafted to honor the talented artists and quilters of Keowee Key.

184 Winter Cardinal

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A Winter Cardinal quilt has also been added to the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail at the Peck home on 202 Winterberry Lane in Seneca, SC. Jane Peck shared with us that “after downsizing from our lake house on Hartwell, it has taken some time for me to invite cardinals onto our feeders. At the lake I would have 6 to 7 families. Needless to say, I have missed them. Therefore, along with time welcoming all the birds in our new neighborhood, I want to especially show the joy of sharing our home with the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail by placing the Cardinal block for all to see. I believe the meaning of a Cardinal visiting your yard is a visit from someone close to you whom you have lost. Watching the Cardinal family, I have been fortunate to have witnessed the male bird feeding his young, protecting his mate. The art of creating a quilt has been something I have admired and the sentiment placed in each and every stitch has always caught my imagination. I am reader and a gardener. Taking great pride in my garden over the years, welcoming the birds and butterflies have given me peace.”

This quilt pattern was a project for work to show applique patterns using Batiks and Prisma dyes. Debra Lunn and Michael Mrowka, owners of Lunn Fabrics in Lancaster, OH, create ideas for batik fabric for Robert Kaufman. Barbara Palumbo and Scott Clark worked together to make an appliqued quilt pattern for each season to promote new lines of fabric. The Cardinal was created in 2008 at the Studios of Lunn Fabrics.

Barbara Palumbo has been an avid sewer since a child and had been doing decorative painting for approximately 20 years, but had no experience quilting. She began by taking classes at Quilt Beginnings Quilt Store in Bexley, OH, and is still taking classes in different sewing techniques.

Scott Clark was hired by Lunn’s to design the caps (chops) that are used in making batik fabrics. Prior to that he designed patterns for screen print design companies. Lunn Studios still continue to make patterns that are available at the store and on-line.

A total of four season quilts were finished. Palumbo said about the quilt designs that, “It gave us a permission to play with applique.” “Also it was good resource to promote the Elementals’ line of batiks in each of the quilts and showed how you could make the fabric work for you”

Lunn Fabrics is located at 317 E. Main Street, Lancaster, Ohio, 43130, phone 740/654-2202. Visit their web site at (www.lunnfabrics.com) to view Lunn Fabrics complete line of Artisan Batiks, Patina Handpaints and Prisma Dyes.

For further info about the Upstate Heritage Quilt Trail call 864/723- 6603, e-mail to (info@uhqt.org) or visit (www.uhqt.org).